• Using 172 plates taken with the 40-cm astrograph of the Sternberg Astronomical Institute (Lomonosov Moscow University) in 1976-1994 and digitized with the resolution of 2400 dpi, we discovered and studied 275 new variable stars. We present the list of our new variables with all necessary information concerning their brightness variations. As in our earlier studies, the new discoveries show a rather large number of high-amplitude Delta Scuti variables, predicting that many stars of this type remain not detected in the whole sky. We also performed automated classification of the newly discovered variable stars based on the Random Forest algorithm. The results of the automated classification were compared to traditional classification and showed that automated classification was possible even with noisy photographic data. However, further improvement of automated techniques is needed, which is especially important having in mind the very large numbers of new discoveries expected from all-sky surveys.
  • Photometric measurements are prone to systematic errors presenting a challenge to low-amplitude variability detection. In search for a general-purpose variability detection technique able to recover a broad range of variability types including currently unknown ones, we test 18 statistical characteristics quantifying scatter and/or correlation between brightness measurements. We compare their performance in identifying variable objects in seven time series data sets obtained with telescopes ranging in size from a telephoto lens to 1m-class and probing variability on time-scales from minutes to decades. The test data sets together include lightcurves of 127539 objects, among them 1251 variable stars of various types and represent a range of observing conditions often found in ground-based variability surveys. The real data are complemented by simulations. We propose a combination of two indices that together recover a broad range of variability types from photometric data characterized by a wide variety of sampling patterns, photometric accuracies, and percentages of outlier measurements. The first index is the interquartile range (IQR) of magnitude measurements, sensitive to variability irrespective of a time-scale and resistant to outliers. It can be complemented by the ratio of the lightcurve variance to the mean square successive difference, 1/h, which is efficient in detecting variability on time-scales longer than the typical time interval between observations. Variable objects have larger 1/h and/or IQR values than non-variable objects of similar brightness. Another approach to variability detection is to combine many variability indices using principal component analysis. We present 124 previously unknown variable stars found in the test data.
  • We identify 339 known and 316 new variable stars of various types among 250000 lightcurves obtained by digitizing 167 30x30cm photographic plates of the Moscow collection. We use these data to conduct a comprehensive test of 18 statistical characteristics (variability indices) in search for the best general-purpose variability detection statistic. We find that the highest peak on the DFT periodogram, interquartile range, median absolute deviation, and Stetson's L index are the most efficient in recovering variable objects from the set of photographic lightcurves used in our test.