• Starting in 2013 February, Swift has been performing short daily monitoring observations of the G2 gas cloud near Sgr A* with the X-Ray Telescope to determine whether the cloud interaction leads to an increase in the flux from the Galactic center. On 2013 April 24 Swift detected an order of magnitude rise in the X-ray flux from the region near Sgr A*. Initially thought to be a flare from Sgr A*, detection of a short hard X-ray burst from the same region by the Burst Alert Telescope suggested that the flare was from an unresolved new Soft Gamma Repeater, SGR J1745-29. Here we present the discovery of SGR J1745-29 by Swift, including analysis of data before, during, and after the burst. We find that the spectrum in the 0.3-10 keV range is well fit by an absorbed blackbody model with kTBB ~ 1 keV and absorption consistent with previously measured values from the quiescent emission from Sgr A*, strongly suggesting that this source is at a similar distance. Only one SGR burst has been detected so far from the new source, and the persistent light curve shows little evidence of decay in approximately 2 weeks of monitoring after outburst. We discuss this light curve trend and compare it with those of other well covered SGR outbursts. We suggest that SGR J1745-29 belongs to an emerging subclass of magnetars characterized by low burst rates and prolonged steady X-ray emission 1-2 weeks after outburst onset.
  • The ultracompact X-ray binary 4U 1820-30 is well known for its ~170-d superorbital modulation in X-ray flux and spectrum, and the exclusiveness of bursting behavior to the low hard 'island' state. In May-June 2009, there was an exceptionally long 51-d low state. This state was well covered by X-ray observations and 12 bursts were detected, 9 with the high-throughput RXTE. We investigate the character of these X-ray bursts and find an interesting change in their photospheric expansion behavior. At the lowest inferred mass accretion rates, this expansion becomes very large in 4 bursts and reaches the so-called superexpansion regime. We speculate that this is due to the geometry of the inner accretion flow being spherical and a decreasing accretion rate: when the flow geometry nearest to the neutron star is spherical and the accretion rate is low, the ram pressure of the accretion disk may become too low to counteract that of the photospheric expansion. In effect, this may provide a novel means to probe the accretion flow. Additionally, we observe a peculiar effect: the well-known cessation of X-ray bursts in the high state is too quick to be consistent with a transition to stable helium burning. We suggest an alternative explanation, that the cessation is due to the introduction of a non-nuclear heat source in the neutron star ocean.
  • We present a generalized analytic formalism for the inverse Compton X-ray emission from hydrogen-poor supernovae and apply this framework to SN2011fe using Swift-XRT, UVOT and Chandra observations. We characterize the optical properties of SN2011fe in the Swift bands and find them to be broadly consistent with a "normal" SN Ia, however, no X-ray source is detected by either XRT or Chandra. We constrain the progenitor system mass loss rate to be lower than 2x10^-9 M_sun/yr (3sigma c.l.) for wind velocity v_w=100 km/s. Our result rules out symbiotic binary progenitors for SN2011fe and argues against Roche-lobe overflowing subgiants and main sequence secondary stars if >1% of the transferred mass is lost at the Lagrangian points. Regardless of the density profile, the X-ray non-detections are suggestive of a clean environment (particle density < 150 cm-3) for (2x10^15<R<5x10^16) cm around the progenitor site. This is either consistent with the bulk of material being confined within the binary system or with a significant delay between mass loss and supernova explosion. We furthermore combine X-ray and radio limits from Chomiuk et al. 2012 to constrain the post shock energy density in magnetic fields. Finally, we searched for the shock breakout pulse using gamma-ray observations from the Interplanetary Network and find no compelling evidence for a supernova-associated burst. Based on the compact radius of the progenitor star we estimate that the shock break out pulse was likely not detectable by current satellites.
  • In the first two years of operation of the Fermi GBM, the 9-spacecraft Interplanetary Network (IPN) detected 158 GBM bursts with one or two distant spacecraft, and triangulated them to annuli or error boxes. Combining the IPN and GBM localizations leads to error boxes which are up to 4 orders of magnitude smaller than those of the GBM alone. These localizations comprise the IPN supplement to the GBM catalog, and they support a wide range of scientific investigations.
  • We present the second Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) catalog of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which contains 476 bursts detected by the BAT between 2004 December 19 and 2009 December 21. This catalog (hereafter the BAT2 catalog) presents burst trigger time, location, 90% error radius, duration, fluence, peak flux, time-averaged spectral parameters and time-resolved spectral parameters measured by the BAT. In the correlation study of various observed parameters extracted from the BAT prompt emission data, we distinguish among long-duration GRBs (L-GRBs), short-duration GRBs (S-GRBs), and short-duration GRBs with extended emission (S-GRBs with E.E.) to investigate differences in the prompt emission properties. The fraction of L-GRBs, S-GRBs and S-GRBs with E.E. in the catalog are 89%, 8% and 2% respectively. We compare the BAT prompt emission properties with the BATSE, BeppoSAX and HETE-2 GRB samples. We also correlate the observed prompt emission properties with the redshifts for the GRBs with known redshift. The BAT T90 and T50 durations peak at 70 s and 30 s, respectively. We confirm that the spectra of the BAT S-GRBs are generally harder than those of the L-GRBs. The time-averaged spectra of the BAT S-GRBs with E.E. are similar to those of the L-GRBs. Whereas, the spectra of the initial short spikes of the S-GRBs with E.E. are similar to those of the S-GRBs. We show that the BAT GRB samples are significantly softer than the BATSE bright GRBs, and that the time-averaged Epeak of the BAT GRBs peaks at 80 keV which is significantly lower energy than those of the BATSE sample which peak at 320 keV. The time-averaged spectral properties of the BAT GRB sample are similar to those of the HETE-2 GRB samples. By time-resolved spectral analysis, we find that only 10% of the BAT observed photon indices are outside the allowed region of the synchrotron shock model.
  • We present results from Swift, XMM-Newton, and deep INTEGRAL monitoring in the region of GRB 050925. This short Swift burst is a candidate for a newly discovered soft gamma-ray repeater (SGR) with the following observational burst properties: 1) galactic plane (b=-0.1 deg) localization, 2) 150 msec duration, and 3) a blackbody rather than a simple power-law spectral shape (with a significance level of 97%). We found two possible X-ray counterparts of GRB 050925 by comparing the X-ray images from Swift XRT and XMM-Newton. Both X-ray sources show the transient behavior with a power-law decay index shallower than -1. We found no hard X-ray emission nor any additional burst from the location of GRB 050925 in ~5 Ms of INTEGRAL data. We discuss about the three BATSE short bursts which might be associated with GRB 050925, based on their location and the duration. Assuming GRB 050925 is associated with the H II regions (W 58) at the galactic longitude of l=70 deg, we also discuss the source frame properties of GRB 050925.
  • We report on the detailed study of the 2008 October outburst from the anomalous X-ray pulsar (AXP) 1E 1547.0-5408 discovered through the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) detection of SGR-like short X-ray bursts on 2008 October 3. The Swift/X-ray Telescope (XRT) started observing the source after less than 100 s since the BAT trigger, when the flux (about 6E-11 erg/cm^2/s in the 2-10 keV range) was >50 times higher than its quiescent level. Swift monitored the outbursting activity of 1E 1547.0-5408 on a daily basis for approximately three weeks. This strategy allowed us to find a phase-coherent solution for the source pulsations after the burst, which, besides period and period derivative, requires a positive Period second derivative term (spin-down increase). The time evolution of the pulse shape is complex and variable, with the pulsed fraction increasing from 20% to 50% within the Swift observational window. The XRT spectra can be fitted well by means of a single component, either a power-law (PL) or a blackbody (BB). During the very initial phases of the outburst the spectrum is hard, with a PL photon index about 2 (or kT about 1.4 keV) which steepens to about 4 (or kT about 0.8 keV) within one day from the BAT trigger, though the two components are likely present simultaneously during the first day spectra. An INTEGRAL observation carried out five days after the trigger provided an upper limit of about 2E-11 erg/cm^2/s to the emission of 1E 1547.0-5408 in the 18-60 keV band.
  • GRB 051103 is considered to be a candidate soft gamma repeater (SGR) extragalactic giant magnetar flare by virtue of its proximity on the sky to M81/M82, as well as its time history, localization, and energy spectrum. We have derived a refined interplanetary network localization for this burst which reduces the size of the error box by over a factor of two. We examine its time history for evidence of a periodic component, which would be one signature of an SGR giant flare, and conclude that this component is neither detected nor detectable under reasonable assumptions. We analyze the time-resolved energy spectra of this event with improved time- and energy resolution, and conclude that although the spectrum is very hard, its temporal evolution at late times cannot be determined, which further complicates the giant flare association. We also present new optical observations reaching limiting magnitudes of R > 24.5, about 4 magnitudes deeper than previously reported. In tandem with serendipitous observations of M81 taken immediately before and one month after the burst, these place strong constraints on any rapidly variable sources in the region of the refined error ellipse proximate to M81. We do not find any convincing afterglow candidates from either background galaxies or sources in M81, although within the refined error region we do locate two UV bright star forming regions which may host SGRs. A supernova remnant (SNR) within the error ellipse could provide further support for an SGR giant flare association, but we were unable to identify any SNR within the error ellipse. These data still do not allow strong constraints on the nature of the GRB 051103 progenitor, and suggest that candidate extragalactic SGR giant flares will be difficult, although not impossible, to confirm.
  • We report a correlation based on a spectral simulation study of the prompt emission spectra of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). The correlation is between the Epeak energy, which is the peak energy in the \nu F_\nu spectrum, and the photon index (\Gamma) derived from a simple power-law model. The Epeak - \Gamma relation, assuming the typical smoothly broken power-law spectrum of GRBs, is \log Epeak = 3.258 - 0.829\Gamma (1.3 < \Gamma < 2.3). We take into account not only a range of Epeak energies and fluences, but also distributions for both the low-energy photon index and the high-energy photon index in the smoothly broken power-law model. The distribution of burst durations in the BAT GRB sample is also included in the simulation. Our correlation is consistent with the index observed by BAT and Epeak measured by the BAT, and by other GRB instruments. Since about 85% of GRBs observed by the BAT are acceptably fit with the simple power-law model because of the relatively narrow energy range of the BAT, this relationship can be used to estimate Epeak when it is located within the BAT energy range.
  • Correlation studies of prompt and afterglow emissions from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) between different spectral bands has been difficult to do in the past because few bursts had comprehensive and intercomparable afterglow measurements. In this paper we present a large and uniform data set for correlation analysis based on bursts detected by the Swift mission. For the first time, short and long bursts can be analyzed and compared. It is found for both classes that the optical, X-ray and gamma-ray emissions are linearly correlated, but with a large spread about the correlation line; stronger bursts tend to have brighter afterglows, and bursts with brighter X-ray afterglow tend to have brighter optical afterglow. Short bursts are, on average, weaker in both prompt and afterglow emissions. No short bursts are seen with extremely low optical to X-ray ratio as occurs for "dark" long bursts. Although statistics are still poor for short bursts, there is no evidence yet for a subgroup of short bursts with high extinction as there is for long bursts. Long bursts are detected in the dark category at the same fraction as for pre-Swift bursts. Interesting cases are discovered of long bursts that are detected in the optical, and yet have low enough optical to X-ray ratio to be classified as dark. For the prompt emission, short and long bursts have different average tracks on flux vs fluence plots. In Swift, GRB detections tend to be fluence limited for short bursts and flux limited for long events.
  • In May 2008 the soft gamma-ray repeater SGR 1627-41 resumed its bursting activity after nearly a decade of quiescence. After detection of a bright burst, Swift pointed its X-ray telescope in the direction of the source in less than five hours and followed it for over five weeks. In this paper we present an analysis of the data from these Swift observations and an XMM-Newton one performed when SGR 1627-41 was still in a quiescent state. The analysis of the bursts detected with Swift/BAT shows that their temporal and spectral properties are similar to those found in previous observations of SGR 1627-41 and other soft gamma-ray repeaters. The maximum peak luminosity of the bursts was about 2E+41 erg/s. Our data show that the outburst was accompanied by a fast flux enhancement and by a hardening of the spectrum with respect to the persistent emission.
  • The discovery of X-ray afterglows accompanying two short bursts from SGR 1900+14 is presented. The afterglow luminosities at the end of each observation are lower by 30-50% than their initial luminosities, and decay with power law indices p ~ 0.2-0.4. Their initial bolometric luminosities are L ~ 10^34-10^35 erg s^-1. We discuss analogies and differences between the X-ray afterglows of SGR short bursts and short gamma-ray bursts.
  • We describe and discuss the spectral and temporal characteristics of the prompt emission and X-ray afterglow emission of X-ray flashes (XRFs) and X-ray-rich gamma-ray bursts (XRRs) detected and observed by Swift between December 2004 and September 2006. We compare these characteristics to a sample of conventional classical gamma-ray bursts (C-GRBs) observed during the same period. We confirm the correlation between Epeak_obs and fluence noted by others and find further evidence that XRFs, XRRs and C-GRBs form a continuum. We also confirm that our known redshift sample is consistent with the correlation between the peak energy in the GRB rest frame (Epeak_src) and the isotropic radiated energy (Eiso), so called the Epeak_src-Eiso relation. The spectral properties of X-ray afterglows of XRFs and C-GRBs are similar, but the temporal properties of XRFs and C-GRBs are quite different. We found that the light curves of C-GRB afterglows show a break to steeper indices (shallow-to-steep break) at much earlier times than do XRF afterglows. Moreover, the overall luminosity of XRF X-ray afterglows is systematically smaller by a factor of two or more compared to that of C-GRBs. These distinct differences between the X-ray afterglows of XRFs and C-GRBs may be the key to understanding not only the mysterious shallow-to-steep break in X-ray afterglow light curves, but also the unique nature of XRFs.
  • We present the first Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) catalog of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which contains bursts detected by the BAT between 2004 December 19 and 2007 June 16. This catalog (hereafter BAT1 catalog) contains burst trigger time, location, 90% error radius, duration, fluence, peak flux, and time averaged spectral parameters for each of 237 GRBs, as measured by the BAT. The BAT-determined position reported here is within 1.75' of the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT)-determined position for 90% of these GRBs. The BAT T_90 and T_50 durations peak at 80 and 20 seconds, respectively. From the fluence-fluence correlation, we conclude that about 60% of the observed peak energies, Epeak, of BAT GRBs could be less than 100 keV. We confirm that GRB fluence to hardness and GRB peak flux to hardness are correlated for BAT bursts in analogous ways to previous missions' results. The correlation between the photon index in a simple power-law model and Epeak is also confirmed. We also report the current status for the on-orbit BAT calibrations based on observations of the Crab Nebula.
  • Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are known to come in two duration classes, separated at ~2 s. Long bursts originate from star forming regions in galaxies, have accompanying supernovae (SNe) when near enough to observe and are likely caused by massive-star collapsars. Recent observations show that short bursts originate in regions within their host galaxies with lower star formation rates consistent with binary neutron star (NS) or NS - black hole (BH) mergers. Moreover, although their hosts are predominantly nearby galaxies, no SNe have been so far associated with short GRBs. We report here on the bright, nearby GRB 060614 that does not fit in either class. Its ~102 s duration groups it with long GRBs, while its temporal lag and peak luminosity fall entirely within the short GRB subclass. Moreover, very deep optical observations exclude an accompanying supernova, similar to short GRBs. This combination of a long duration event without accompanying SN poses a challenge to both a collapsar and merging NS interpretation and opens the door on a new GRB classification scheme that straddles both long and short bursts.
  • We report Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) observations of the X-ray Flash (XRF) XRF 050416A. The fluence ratio between the 15-25 keV and 25-50 keV energy bands of this event is 1.5, thus making it the softest gamma-ray burst (GRB) observed by BAT so far. The spectrum is well fitted by the Band function with E^{\rm obs}_{\rm peak} of 15.0_{-2.7}^{+2.3} keV. Assuming the redshift of the host galaxy (z = 0.6535), the isotropic-equivalent radiated energy E_{\rm iso} and the peak energy at the GRB rest frame (E^{\rm src}_{\rm peak}) of XRF 050416A are not only consistent with the correlation found by Amati et al. and extended to XRFs by Sakamoto et al., but also fill-in the gap of this relation around the 30 - 80 keV range of E^{\rm src}_{\rm peak}. This result tightens the validity of the E^{\rm src}_{\rm peak} - E_{\rm iso} relation from XRFs to GRBs. We also find that the jet break time estimated using the empirical relation between E^{\rm src}_{\rm peak} and the collimation corrected energy E_{\gamma} is inconsistent with the afterglow observation by Swift X-ray Telescope. This could be due to the extra external shock emission overlaid around the jet break time or to the non existence of a jet break feature for XRF, which might be a further challenging for GRB jet emission, models and XRF/GRB unification scenarios.
  • This paper discusses Swift observations of the gamma-ray burst GRB 050315 (z=1.949) from 80 s to 10 days after the onset of the burst. The X-ray light curve displayed a steep early decay (t^-5) for ~200 s and several breaks. However, both the prompt hard X-ray/gamma-ray emission (observed by the BAT) and the first ~ 300 s of X-ray emission (observed by the XRT) can be explained by exponential decays, with similar decay constants. Extrapolating the BAT light curve into the XRT band suggests the rapidly decaying, early X-ray emission was simply a continuation of the fading prompt emission; this strong similarity between the prompt gamma-ray and early X-ray emission may be related to the simple temporal and spectral character of this X-ray rich GRB. The prompt (BAT) spectrum was a steep down to 15 keV, and appeared to continue through the XRT bandpass, implying a low peak energy, inconsistent with the Amati relation. Following the initial steep decline the X-ray afterglow did not fade for ~1.2*10^4 s, after which time it decayed with a temporal index of alpha ~ 0.7, followed by a second break at ~2.5*10^5 s to a slope of alpha ~ 2. The apparent `plateau' in the X-ray light curve, after the early rapid decay, makes this one of the most extreme examples of the steep-flat-steep X-ray light curves revealed by Swift. If the second afterglow break is identified with a jet break then the jet opening angle was theta_0 ~ 5 deg, and implying E_gamma > 10^50 erg.
  • The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) is one of 3 instruments on the Swift MIDEX spacecraft to study gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The BAT first detects the GRB and localizes the burst direction to an accuracy of 1-4 arcmin within 20 sec after the start of the event. The GRB trigger initiates an autonomous spacecraft slew to point the two narrow field-of-view (FOV) instruments at the burst location within 20-70 sec so to make follow-up x-ray and optical observations. The BAT is a wide-FOV, coded-aperture instrument with a CdZnTe detector plane. The detector plane is composed of 32,768 pieces of CdZnTe (4x4x2mm), and the coded-aperture mask is composed of approximately 52,000 pieces of lead (5x5x1mm) with a 1-m separation between mask and detector plane. The BAT operates over the 15-150 keV energy range with approximately 7 keV resolution, a sensitivity of approximately 10E-8 erg*cm^-2*s^-1, and a 1.4 sr (half-coded) FOV. We expect to detect >100 GRBs/yr for a 2-year mission. The BAT also performs an all-sky hard x-ray survey with a sensitivity of approximately 2 mCrab (systematic limit) and it serves as a hard x-ray transient monitor.
  • Soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) are "magnetars", a small class of slowly spinning neutron stars with extreme surface magnetic fields, ~10^15 gauss. On 2004 December 27, a giant flare was detected from the magnetar SGR 1806-20, the third such event ever recorded. This burst of energy was detected by a variety of instruments and even caused an ionospheric disturbance in the Earth's upper atmosphere recorded around the globe. Here we report the detection of a fading radio afterglow produced by this outburst, with a luminosity 500 times larger than the only other detection of a similar source. From day 6 to day 19 after the flare from SGR 1806-20, a resolved, linearly polarized, radio nebula was seen, expanding at approximately a quarter the speed of light. To create this nebula, at least 4x10^43 ergs of energy must have been emitted by the giant flare in the form of magnetic fields and relativistic particles. The combination of spatially resolved structure and rapid time evolution allows a study in unprecedented detail of a nearby analog to supernovae and gamma-ray bursts.
  • Magnetars comprise two classes of rotating neutron stars (Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGRs) and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars), whose X-ray emission is powered by an ultrastrong magnetic field, B ~ 10^15 G. Occasionally SGRs enter into active episodes producing many short X-ray bursts; extremely rarely (about once per 50 years per source), SGRs emit a giant flare, an event with total energy at least 1000 times higher than their typical bursts. Here we report that, on 2004 December 27, SGR 1806-20 emitted the brightest extra-solar transient event ever recorded, even surpassing the full moon brightness for 0.2 seconds. The total (isotropic) flare energy is 2x10^46 erg, 100 times higher than the only two previous events, making this flare a once in a century event. This colossal energy release likely occurred during a catastrophic reconfiguration of the magnetar's magnetic field. Such an event would have resembled a short, hard Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) if it had occurred within 40 Mpc, suggesting that extragalactic SGR flares may indeed form a subclass of GRBs.
  • The BAT instrument tells the Swift satellite where to point to make immediate follow-up observations of GRBs. The science software on board must efficiently process gamma-ray events coming in at up to 34 kHz, identify rate increases that could be due to GRBs while disregarding those from known sources, and produce images to accurately and rapidly locate new Gamma-ray sources.
  • We have obtained spectra of the Galactic center at energies 400-600 keV from high-resolution data acquired by the TGRS Ge spectrometer on board the WIND mission during 1995-1997. The data were obtained using an on-board occulter, and are relatively free from systematics and backgrounds. Analysis of the spectra reveals a well-resolved electron-positron annihilation line at 511 keV and the associated continuum due to annihilation via positronium formation. Measurements of the line width and the line-to-continuum ratio allow some constraints to be placed on the interstellar sites where annihilation occurs.
  • Visible afterglow counterparts have now been detected for two GRBs (970228 and 970508) but are absent, with $L_{opt}/L_{\gamma}$ ratios at least two orders of magnitude lower, for other GRBs, e.g., 970828. The causes of this variation are unknown. Any correspondence which could be discovered between the gamma-ray properties of a GRB and its $L_{opt}/L_{\gamma}$ would be useful, both in determining the GRB mechanisms, and in allocating resources for counterpart searches and studies. This paper presents the gamma-ray spectra of GRB 970228 as measured by the Transient Gamma-Ray Spectrometer and comments on characteristics of this GRB compared to others that do and do not have observable counterparts.
  • We evaluate the significance of the line candidates identified by a visual search of burst spectra from BATSE's Spectroscopy Detectors. None of the candidates satisfy our detection criteria: an F-test probability less than 10^-4 for a feature in one detector and consistency among the detectors which viewed the burst. Most of the candidates are not very significant, and are likely to be fluctuations. Because of the expectation of finding absorption lines, the search was biased towards absorption features. We do not have a quantitative measure of the completeness of the search which would enable a comparison with previous missions. Therefore a more objective computerized search has begun.
  • We evaluate the ability of the BATSE spectroscopy detectors to detect the absorption lines observed by Ginga in gamma ray burst spectra. We find that BATSE can detect the 20.6 keV line in the S1 segment of GB870303 with a detection probability of ~1/4 in nearly normally incident bursts, with the probability dropping off to nearly 0 at a burst angle of 50 degrees; the lines at 19.4 and 38.8 keV lines in GB880205 have a high detection probability in BATSE up to burst angles of 75 degrees. In addition, we calculate detection probabilities for these two line types as a function of signal-to-noise ratio and burst angle for use in detailed comparisons between BATSE and Ginga. Finally, we consider the probability averaged over the sky of detecting a line feature with the actual array of BATSE detectors on CGRO.