• Inspired by recent experimental observation of patterning at the membrane of a living cell, we propose a generic model for the dynamics of a fluctuating interface driven by particle-like inclusions which stimulate its growth. We find that the coupling between interfacial and inclusions dynam- ics yields microphase separation and the self-organisation of travelling waves. These patterns are strikingly similar to those detected in the aforementioned experiments on actin-protein systems. Our results further show that the active growth kinetics does not fall into the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality class for growing interfaces, displaying instead a novel superposition of equilibrium-like scaling and sustained oscillations.
  • We propose a stochastic model for gene transcription coupled to DNA supercoiling, where we incorporate the experimental observation that polymerases create supercoiling as they unwind the DNA helix, and that these enzymes bind more favourably to regions where the genome is unwound. Within this model, we show that when the transcriptionally induced flux of supercoiling increases, there is a sharp crossover from a regime where torsional stresses relax quickly and gene transcription is random, to one where gene expression is highly correlated and tightly regulated by supercoiling. In the latter regime, the model displays transcriptional bursts, waves of supercoiling, and up-regulation of divergent or bidirectional genes. It also predicts that topological enzymes which relax twist and writhe should provide a pathway to down-regulate transcription. This article has been published in Physical Review Letters, May 2016.
  • We study the rheology of a suspension of soft deformable droplets subjected to a pressure-driven flow. Through computer simulations, we measure the apparent viscosity as a function of droplet concentration and pressure gradient, and provide evidence of a discontinuous shear thinning behaviour, which occurs at a concentration-dependent value of the forcing. We further show that this response is associated with a nonequilibrium transition between a `hard' (or less deformable) phase, which is nearly jammed and flows very slowly, and a `soft' (or more deformable) phase, which flows much more easily. The soft phase is characterised by flow-induced time dependent shape deformations and internal currents, which are virtually absent in the hard phase. Close to the transition, we find sustained oscillations in both the droplet and fluid velocities. Polydisperse systems show similar phenomenology but with a smoother transition, and less regular oscillations.
  • There is a long-standing experimental observation that the melting of topologically constrained DNA, such as circular-closed plasmids, is less abrupt than that of linear molecules. This finding points to an intriguing role of topology in the physics of DNA denaturation, which is however poorly understood. Here, we shed light on this issue by combining large-scale Brownian Dynamics simulations with an analytically solvable phenomenological Landau mean field theory. We find that the competition between melting and supercoiling leads to phase coexistence of denatured and intact phases at the single molecule level. This coexistence occurs in a wide temperature range, thereby accounting for the broadening of the transition. Finally, our simulations show an intriguing topology-dependent scaling law governing the growth of denaturation bubbles in supercoiled plasmids, which can be understood within the proposed mean field theory.
  • We study the compression and extension dynamics of a DNA-like polymer interacting with non-DNA binding and DNA-binding proteins, by means of computer simulations. The geometry we consider is inspired by recent experiments probing the compressional elasticity of the bacterial nucleoid (DNA plus associated proteins), where DNA is confined into a cylindrical container and subjected to the action of a "piston" - a spherical bead to which an external force is applied. We quantify the effect of steric interactions (excluded volume) on the force-extension curves as the polymer is compressed. We find that non-DNA-binding proteins, even at low densities, exert an osmotic force which can be a lot larger than the entropic force exerted by the compressed DNA. The trends we observe are qualitatively robust with respect to changes in protein size, and are similar for neutral and charged proteins (and DNA). We also quantify the dynamics of DNA expansion following removal of the "piston": while the expansion is well fitted by power laws, the apparent exponent depends on protein concentration, and protein-DNA interaction in a significant way. We further highlight an interesting kinetic process which we observe during the expansion of DNA interacting with DNA-binding proteins when the interaction strength is intermediate: the proteins bind while the DNA is packaged by the compression force, but they "pop-off" one-by-one as the force is removed, leading to a slow unzipping kinetics. Finally, we quantify the importance of supercoiling, which is an important feature of bacterial DNA in vivo.
  • We propose a model for the formation of chromatin loops based on the diffusive sliding of a DNA-bound factor which can dimerise to form a molecular slip-link. Our slip-links mimic the behaviour of cohesin-like molecules, which, along with the CTCF protein, stabilize loops which organize the genome. By combining 3D Brownian dynamics simulations and 1D exactly solvable non-equilibrium models, we show that diffusive sliding is sufficient to account for the strong bias in favour of convergent CTCF-mediated chromosome loops observed experimentally. Importantly, our model does not require any underlying, and energetically costly, motor activity of cohesin. We also find that the diffusive motion of multiple slip-links along chromatin may be rectified by an intriguing ratchet effect that arises if slip-links bind to the chromatin at a preferred "loading site". This emergent collective behaviour is driven by a 1D osmotic pressure which is set up near the loading point, and favours the extrusion of loops which are much larger than the ones formed by single slip-links.
  • Here we study theoretically the dynamics of a 2D and a 3D isotropic droplet in a nematic liquid crystal under a shear flow. We find a large repertoire of possible nonequilibrium steady states as a function of the shear rate and of the anchoring of the nematic director field at the droplet surface. We first discuss homeotropic anchoring. For weak anchoring, we recover the typical behaviour of a sheared isotropic droplet in a binary fluid, which rotates, stretches and can be broken by the applied flow. For intermediate anchoring, new possibilities arise due to elastic effects in the nematic fluid. We find that in this regime the 2D droplet can tilt and move in the flow, or tumble incessantly at the centre of the channel. For sufficiently strong anchoring, finally, one or both of the topological defects which form close to the surface of the isotropic droplet in equilibrium detach from it and get dragged deep into the nematic state by the flow. In 3D, instead, the Saturn ring associated with normal anchoring disclination line can be deformed and shifted downstream by the flow, but remains always localized in proximity of the droplet, at least for the parameter range we explored. Tangential anchoring in 2D leads to a different dynamic response, as the boojum defects characteristic of this situation can unbind from the droplet under a weaker shear with respect to the normal anchoring case. Our results should stimulate further experiments with inverted liquid crystal emulsions under shear, as most of the predictions can be testable in principle by monitoring the evolution of liquid crystalline orientation patterns or by tracking the position and shape of the droplet over time.
  • The computational modelling of DNA is becoming crucial in light of new advances in DNA nanotechnology, single-molecule experiments and in vivo DNA tampering. Here we present a mesoscopic model for double stranded DNA (dsDNA) at the single nucleotide level which retains the characteristic helical structure, while being able to simulate large molecules -- up to a million base pairs -- for time-scales which are relevant to physiological processes. This is made possible by an efficient and highly-parallelised implementation of the model which we discuss here. We compare the behaviour of our model with single molecule experiments where dsDNA is manipulated by external forces or torques. We also present some results on the kinetics of denaturation of linear DNA.
  • Fluorescence microscopy reveals that the contents of many (membrane-free) nuclear "bodies" exchange rapidly with the soluble pool whilst the underlying structure persists; such observations await a satisfactory biophysical explanation. To shed light on this, we perform large-scale Brownian dynamics simulations of a chromatin fiber interacting with an ensemble of (multivalent) DNA-binding proteins; these proteins switch between two states -- active (binding) and inactive (non-binding). This system provides a model for any DNA-binding protein that can be modified post-translationally to change its affinity for DNA (e.g., like the phosphorylation of a transcription factor). Due to this out-of-equilibrium process, proteins spontaneously assemble into clusters of self-limiting size, as individual proteins in a cluster exchange with the soluble pool with kinetics like those seen in photo-bleaching experiments. This behavior contrasts sharply with that exhibited by "equilibrium", or non-switching, proteins that exist only in the binding state; when these bind to DNA non-specifically, they form clusters that grow indefinitely in size. Our results point to post-translational modification of chromatin-bridging proteins as a generic mechanism driving the self-assembly of highly dynamic, non-equilibrium, protein clusters with the properties of nuclear bodies. Such active modification also reshapes intra-chromatin contacts to give networks resembling those seen in topologically-associating domains, as switching markedly favors local (short-range) contacts over distant ones.
  • Self-propelled colloidal objects, such as motile bacteria or synthetic microswimmers, have microscopically irreversible individual dynamics - a feature they share with all living systems. The incoherent behaviour of individual swimmers can then be harnessed (or "rectified") by microfluidic devices that create systematic motions impossible in equilibrium. Examples include flow of rotor particles round a circuit, steady rotation of a gear wheel in a bacterial bath, and pumping of bacteria between chambers by "funnel gates". Here we present a computational proof-of-concept study, showing that such active rectification devices might be created directly from an unstructured "primordial soup" of motile particles, solely by using spatially modulated illumination to control their local propulsion speed. Alongside both microscopic irreversibility and speed modulation, our mechanism requires spatial symmetry breaking, such as a chevron light pattern, and strong interactions between particles, such as volume exclusion causing a collisional slow-down at high density. These four factors create a many-body rectification mechanism that generically differs from one-body microfluidic antecedents. Our work suggests that standard spatial-light-modulator technology might allow the programmable, light-induced self-assembly of active rectification devices from an unstructured particle bath.
  • The first level of folding of DNA in eukaryotes is provided by the so called '10 nm chromatin fibre', where DNA wraps around histone proteins (approx. 10 nm in size) to form nucleosomes, which go on to create a zig zagging bead on a string structure. In this work we present a 1 dimensional statistical mechanics model to study nucleosome positioning within one such 10 nm fibre. We focus on the case of genomic sheep DNA, and we start from effective potentials valid at infinite dilution and determined from high resolution in vitro salt dialysis experiments. We study positioning within a polynucleosome chain, and compare the results for genomic DNA to that obtained in the simplest case of homogeneous DNA, where the problem can be mapped to a Tonks gas. First, we consider the simple, analytically solvable, case where nucleosomes are assumed to be point like. Then, we perform numerical simulations to gauge the effect of their finite size on the nucleosomal distribution probabilities. Finally we compare nucleosome distributions and simulated nuclease digestion patterns for the two cases (homogeneous and sheep DNA), thereby providing testable predictions of the effect of sequence on experimentally observable quantities in experiments on polynucleosome chromatin fibres reconstituted in vitro.
  • Biophysicists are modeling conformations of interphase chromosomes, often basing the strengths of interactions between segments distant on the genetic map on contact frequencies determined experimentally. Here, instead, we develop a fitting-free, minimal model: bivalent red and green "transcription factors" bind to cognate sites in runs of beads ("chromatin") to form molecular bridges stabilizing loops. In the absence of additional explicit forces, molecular dynamic simulations reveal that bound "factors' spontaneously cluster -- red with red, green with green, but rarely red with green -- to give structures reminiscent of transcription factories. Binding of just two transcription factors (or proteins) to active and inactive regions of human chromosomes yields rosettes, topological domains, and contact maps much like those seen experimentally. This emergent "bridging-induced attraction" proves to be a robust, simple, and generic force able to organize interphase chromosomes at all scales.
  • Colloidal particles dispersed in liquid crystals can form new materials with tunable elastic and electro-optic properties. In a periodic `blue phase' host, particles should template into colloidal crystals with potential uses in photonics, metamaterials, and transformational optics. Here we show by computer simulation that colloid/cholesteric mixtures can give rise to regular crystals, glasses, percolating gels, isolated clusters, twisted rings and undulating colloidal ropes. This structure can be tuned via particle concentration, and by varying the surface interactions of the cholesteric host with both the particles and confining walls. Many of these new materials are metastable: two or more structures can arise under identical thermodynamic conditions. The observed structure depends not only on the formulation protocol, but also on the history of an applied electric field. This new class of soft materials should thus be relevant to design of switchable, multistable devices for optical technologies such as smart glass and e-paper.
  • We study how dispersions of colloidal particles in a cholesteric liquid crystal behave under a time-dependent electric field. By controlling the amplitude and shape of the applied field wave, we show that the system can be reproducibly driven out of equilibrium through different kinetic pathways and navigated through a glassy-like free energy landscape encompassing many competing metastable equilibria. Such states range from simple Saturn rings to complex structures featuring amorphous defect networks, or stacks of disclination loops. A non-equilibrium electric field can also trigger the alignment of particles into columnar arrays, through defect-mediated force impulses, or their repositioning within a plane. Our results are promising in terms of providing new avenues towards controlled patterning and self-assembly of soft colloid-liquid crystal composite materials.
  • Cell motility in higher organisms (eukaryotes) is crucial to biological functions ranging from wound healing to immune response, and also implicated in diseases such as cancer. For cells crawling on hard surfaces, significant insights into motility have been gained from experiments replicating such motion in vitro. Such experiments show that crawling uses a combination of actin treadmilling (polymerization), which pushes the front of a cell forward, and myosin-induced stress (contractility), which retracts the rear. Here we present a simplified physical model of a crawling cell, consisting of a droplet of active polar fluid with contractility throughout, but treadmilling connected to a thin layer near the supporting wall. The model shows a variety of shapes and/or motility regimes, some closely resembling cases seen experimentally. Our work strongly supports the view that cellular motility exploits autonomous physical mechanisms whose operation does not need continuous regulatory effort.
  • We have measured the spatial distribution of motile Escherichia coli inside spherical water droplets emulsified in oil. At low cell concentrations, the cell density peaks at the water-oil interface; at increasing concentration, the bulk of each droplet fills up uniformly while the surface peak remains. Simulations and theory show that the bulk density results from a `traffic' of cells leaving the surface layer, increasingly due to cell-cell scattering as the surface coverage rises above $\sim 10\%$. Our findings show similarities with the physics of a rarefied gas in a spherical cavity with attractive walls.
  • We perform large scale three-dimensional molecular dynamics simulations of unlinked and unknotted ring polymers diffusing through a background gel, here a three-dimensional cubic lattice. Taking advantage of this architecture, we propose a new method to unambiguously identify and quantify inter-ring threadings (penetrations) and to relate these to the dynamics of the ring polymers. We find that both the number and the persistence time of the threadings increase with the length of the chains, ultimately leading to a percolating network of inter-ring penetrations. We discuss the implications of these findings for the possible emergence of a topological jammed state of very long rings.
  • An elastic rod model for semi-flexible polymers is presented. Theory for a continuum rod is reviewed, and it is shown that a popular discretised model used in numerical simulations gives the correct continuum limit. Correlation functions relating to both bending and twisting of the rod are derived for both continuous and discrete cases, and results are compared with numerical simulations. Finally, two possible implementations of the discretised model in the multi-purpose molecular dynamics software package LAMMPS are described.
  • We simulate colloids (radius $R \sim 1\mu$m) trapped at the interface between a cholesteric liquid crystal and an immiscible oil, at which the helical order (pitch p) in the bulk conflicts with the orientation induced at the interface, stabilizing an ordered array of disclinations. For weak anchoring strength W of the director field at the colloidal surface, this creates a template, favoring particle positions eitheron top of or midway between defect lines, depending on $\alpha = R/p$. For small $\alpha$, optical microscopy experiments confirm this picture, but for larger $\alpha$ no templating is seen. This may stem from the emergence at moderate W of a rugged energy landscape associated with defect reconnections.
  • In bacteria, regulatory proteins search for a specific DNA binding target via "facilitated diffusion": a series of rounds of 3D diffusion in the cytoplasm, and 1D linear diffusion along the DNA contour. Using large scale Brownian dynamics simulations we find that each of these steps is affected differently by crowding proteins, which can either be bound to the DNA acting as a road block to the 1D diffusion, or freely diffusing in the cytoplasm. Macromolecular crowding can strongly affect mechanistic features such as the balance between 3D and 1D diffusion, but leads to surprising robustness of the total search time.
  • We present a combined numerical and analytical study of pattern formation in an active system where particles align, possess a density-dependent motility, and are subject to a logistic reaction. This is a model for suspensions of reproducing bacteria, but it can also represent, in the ordered phase, actomyosin gels in vitro or in vivo. In the disordered phase, we find that motility suppression and growth compete to yield stable or blinking patterns, which, when dense enough, acquire internal orientational ordering, to yield asters or spirals. In the ordered phase, the reaction term leads to previously unobserved never-settling patterns which can provide a simple framework to understand the formation of motile and spiral patterns in actin.
  • We study colonies of non-motile, rod-shaped bacteria growing on solid substrates. In our model, bacteria interact purely mechanically, by pushing each other away as they grow, and consume a diffusing nutrient. We show that mechanical interactions control the velocity and shape of the advancing front, which leads to features that cannot be captured by established Fisher-Kolmogorov models. In particular, we find that the velocity depends on the elastic modulus of bacteria or their stickiness to the surface. Interestingly, we predict that the radius of an incompressible, strictly two-dimensional colony cannot grow linearly in time. Importantly, mechanical interactions can also account for the nonequilibrium transition between circular and branching colonies, often observed in the lab.
  • We present computer simulations of the response of a flexoelectric blue phase network, either in bulk or under confinement, to an applied field. We find a transition in the bulk between the blue phase I disclination network and a parallel array of disclinations along the direction of the applied field. Upon switching off the field, the system is unable to reconstruct the original blue phase but gets stuck in a metastable phase. Blue phase II is comparatively much less affected by the field. In confined samples, the anchoring at the walls and the geometry of the device lead to the stabilisation of further structures, including field-aligned disclination loops, splayed nematic patterns, and yet more metastable states. Our results are relevant to the understanding of the switching dynamics for a class of new, "superstable", blue phases which are composed of bimesogenic liquid crystals, as these materials combine anomalously large flexoelectric coefficients, and low or near-zero dielectric anisotropy.
  • We present Brownian dynamics simulations of the facilitated diffusion of a protein, modelled as a sphere with a binding site on its surface, along DNA, modelled as a semi-flexible polymer. We consider both the effect of DNA organisation in 3D, and of sequence heterogeneity. We find that in a network of DNA loops, as are thought to be present in bacterial DNA, the search process is very sensitive to the spatial location of the target within such loops. Therefore, specific genes might be repressed or promoted by changing the local topology of the genome. On the other hand, sequence heterogeneity creates traps which normally slow down facilitated diffusion. When suitably positioned, though, these traps can, surprisingly, render the search process much more efficient.
  • We explore a generic mechanism whereby a droplet of active matter acquires motility by the spontaneous breakdown of a discrete symmetry. The model we study offers a simple representation of a "cell extract" comprising, e.g., a droplet of actomyosin solution. (Such extracts are used experimentally to model the cytoskeleton.) Actomyosin is an active gel whose polarity describes the mean sense of alignment of actin fibres. In the absence of polymerization and depolymerization processes ('treadmilling'), the gel's dynamics arises solely from the contractile motion of myosin motors; this should be unchanged when polarity is inverted. Our results suggest that motility can arise in the absence of treadmilling, by spontaneous symmetry breaking (SSB) of polarity inversion symmetry. Adapting our model to wall-bound cells in two dimensions, we find that as wall friction is reduced, treadmilling-induced motility falls but SSB-mediated motility rises. The latter might therefore be crucial in three dimensions where frictional forces are likely to be modest. At a supra-cellular level, the same generic mechanism can impart motility to aggregates of non-motile but active bacteria; we show that SSB in this (extensile) case leads generically to rotational as well as translational motion.