• The nonlinear interaction between Near-Infrared (NIR) and Terahertz pulses is principally investigated as a means for the detection of radiation in the hardly accessible THz spectral region. Most studies have targeted second-order nonlinear processes, given their higher efficiencies, and only a limited number have addressed third-order nonlinear interactions, mainly investigating four-wave mixing in air for broadband THz detection. We have studied the nonlinear interaction between THz and NIR pulses in solid-state media (specifically diamond), and we show how the former can be frequency-shifted up to UV frequencies by the scattering from the nonlinear polarisation induced by the latter. Such UV emission differs from the well-known electric-field-induced second harmonic (EFISH) one, as it is generated via a phase-insensitive scattering, rather than a sum- or difference-frequency four-wave-mixing process.
  • Many galaxies contain magnetic fields supported by galactic dynamo action. However, nothing definitive is known about magnetic fields in ring galaxies. Here we investigate large-scale magnetic fields in a previously unexplored context, namely ring galaxies, and concentrate our efforts on the structures that appear most promising for galactic dynamo action, i.e. outer star-forming rings in visually unbarred galaxies. We use tested methods for modelling $\alpha-\Omega$ galactic dynamos, taking into account the available observational information concerning ionized interstellar matter in ring galaxies. Our main result is that dynamo drivers in ring galaxies are strong enough to excite large-scale magnetic fields in the ring galaxies studied. The variety of dynamo driven magnetic configurations in ring galaxies obtained in our modelling is much richer than that found in classical spiral galaxies. In particular, various long-lived transients are possible. An especially interesting case is that of NGC 4513 where the ring counter-rotates with respect to the disc. Strong shear in the region between the disc and the ring is associated with unusually strong dynamo drivers for the counter-rotators. The effect of the strong drivers is found to be unexpectedly moderate. With counter-rotation in the disc, a generic model shows that a steady mixed parity magnetic configuration, unknown for classical spiral galaxies, may be excited, although we do not specifically model NGC 4513. We deduce that ring galaxies constitute a morphological class of galaxies in which identification of large-scale magnetic fields from observations of polarized radio emission, as well as dynamo modelling, may be possible. Such studies have the potential to throw additional light on the physical nature of rings, their lifetimes and evolution.
  • Recent progress in observational studies of magnetic activity in M dwarfs urgently requires support from ideas of stellar dynamo theory. We propose a strategy to connect observational and theoretical studies. In particular, we suggest four magnetic configurations that appear relevant to dwarfs from the viewpoint of the most conservative version of dynamo theory, and discuss observational tests to identify the configurations observationally. As expected, any such identification contains substantial uncertainties. However the situation in general looks less pessimistic than might be expected. Several identifications between the phenomenology of individual stars and dynamo models are suggested. Remarkably, all models discussed predict substantial surface magnetic activity at rather high stellar latitudes. This prediction looks unexpected from the viewpoint of our experience observing the Sun (which of course differs in some fundamental ways from these late-type dwarfs). We stress that a fuller understanding of the topic requires a long-term (at least 15 years) monitoring of M dwarfs by Zeeman-Doppler imaging.
  • Magnetic fields are observed beyond the peripheries of optically detected galactic discs, while numerical models of their origin and the typical magnitudes are still absent. Previously, studies of galactic dynamo have avoided considering the peripheries of galactic discs because of the very limited (though gradually growing) knowledge about the local properties of the interstellar medium. Here we investigate the possibility that magnetic fields can be generated in the outskirts of discs, taking the Milky Way as an example. We consider a simple evolving galactic dynamo model in the "no-z" formulation, applicable to peripheral regions of galaxies, for various assumptions about the radial and vertical profiles of the ionized gas disc. The magnetic field may grow as galaxies evolve, even in the more remote parts of the galactic disc, out to radii of 15 to 30 kpc, becoming substantial after times of about 10 Gyr. This result depends weakly on the adopted distributions of the half thickness and surface density of the ionized gas component. The model is robust to changes in the amplitude of the initial field and the position of its maximum strength. The magnetic field in the remote parts of the galactic disc could be generated in situ from a seed field by local dynamo action. Another possibility is field production in the central regions of a galaxy, followed by transport to the disc's periphery by the joint action of the dynamo and turbulent diffusivity. Our results demonstrate the possibilities for the appearance and strengthening of magnetic fields at the peripheries of disc galaxies and emphasize the need for observational tests with new and anticipated radio telescopes (LOFAR, MWA, and SKA).
  • M-dwarfs demonstrate two types of activity: 1) strong (kilogauss) almost axisymmetric poloidal magnetic fields; and 2) considerably weaker nonaxisymmetric fields, sometimes including a substantial toroidal component. Dynamo bistability has been proposed as an explanation. However it is not straightforward to obtain such a bistability in dynamo models. On the other hand, the solar magnetic dipole at times of magnetic field inversion becomes transverse to the rotation axis, while the magnetic field becomes weaker at times far from that of inversion. Thus the Sun resembles a star with the second type of activity. We suggest that M-dwarfs can have magnetic cycles, and that M-dwarfs with the second type of activity can just be stars observed at times of magnetic field inversion. Then the relative number of M-dwarfs with the second type of activity can be used in the framework of this model to determine parameters of stellar convection near the surface.
  • Intense laser pulses excite a nonlinear polarisation response that may create an effective flowing medium and, under appropriate conditions, a blocking horizon for light. Here we analyse in detail the interaction of light with such laser-induced flowing media, fully accounting for the medium dispersion properties. An analytical model based on a first Born-approximation is found to be in excellent agreement with numerical simulations based on Maxwell's equations and shows that when a blocking horizon is formed, the stimulated medium scatters light with a blackbody emission spectrum. Based on these results, diamond is proposed as a promising candidate medium for future studies of Hawking emission from artificial, dispersive horizons.
  • Context. Observations of polarized radio emission show that large-scale (regular) magnetic fields in spiral galaxies are not axisymmetric, but generally stronger in interarm regions. In some nearby galaxies such as NGC 6946 they are organized in narrow magnetic arms situated between the material spiral arms. Aims. The phenomenon of magnetic arms and their relation to the optical spiral arms (the material arms) call for an explanation in the framework of galactic dynamo theory. Several possibilities have been suggested but are not completely satisfactory; here we attempt a consistent investigation. Methods. We use a 2D mean-field dynamo model in the no-z approximation and add injections of small-scale magnetic field, taken to result from supernova explosions, to represent the effects of dynamo action on smaller scales. This injection of small scale field is situated along the spiral arms, where star-formation mostly occurs. Results. A straightforward explanation of magnetic arms as a result of modulation of the dynamo mechanism by material arms struggles to produce pronounced magnetic arms, at least with realistic parameters, without introducing new effects such as a time lag between Coriolis force and {\alpha}-effect. In contrast, by taking into account explicitly the small-scale magnetic field that is injected into the arms by the action of the star forming regions that are concentrated there, we can obtain dynamo models with magnetic structures of various forms that can be compared with magnetic arms. (abbrev). Conclusions. We conclude that magnetic arms can be considered as coherent magnetic structures generated by large-scale dynamo action, and associated with spatially modulated small-scale magnetic fluctuations, caused by enhanced star formation rates within the material arms.
  • We investigate to what extent the current helicity distribution observed in solar active regions is compatible with solar dynamo models. We use an advanced 2D mean-field dynamo model with dynamo action largely concentrated near the bottom of the convective zone, and dynamo saturation based on the evolution of the magnetic helicity and algebraic quenching. For comparison, we also studied a more basic 2D mean-field dynamo model with simple algebraic alpha quenching only. Using these numerical models we obtain butterfly diagrams for both the small-scale current helicity and the large-scale magnetic helicity, and compare them with the butterfly diagram for the current helicity in active regions obtained from observations. This comparison shows that the current helicity of active regions, as estimated by $-A \cdot B$ evaluated at the depth from which the active region arises, resembles the observational data much better than the small-scale current helicity calculated directly from the helicity evolution equation. Here $B$ and $A$ are respectively the dynamo generated mean magnetic field and its vector potential.
  • The magnetic field of galaxies is believed to be produced by internal dynamo action, but can be affected by motion of the galaxy through the surrounding medium. Observations of polarized radio emission of galaxies located in galaxy clusters have revealed noticeable features of large-scale magnetic configurations, including displacements of the magnetic structures from the optical images and tails, which are possible imprints of ram pressure effects arising from motion of the galaxies through the intracluster medium. We present a quantitative dynamo model which attempts to describe the above effects. In contrast to the traditional problem of a wind affecting a body with a prescribed magnetic field, we investigate how a non-magnetized wind flow affects a magnetic field that is being self-excited by galactic dynamo action. In order to isolate the leading physical effects we exploit a simple dynamo model that can describe relevant effects. In particular, we use what is known as the 'no-z' approximation for the mean-field dynamo equations. In a suitable parametric range we obtain displacements of the large-scale magnetic field, as well as magnetic tails. However, the specific details of their locations are quite counterintuitive. The direction of displacement is perpendicular to, rather than parallel to, the wind direction. The point at which the tail emerges from the galaxy depends on details of the model. The tail is eventually directed downstream. In the simplest case the magnetic tail begins in the region where the wind decreases the total gas velocity. Any wind that penetrates the galaxy modifies the intrinsic dynamo action. These features are different from those found in ram-pressure models. Any determination of galactic motion through the cluster medium from observational data needs to take the effects of dynamo action into account.
  • [Abridged abstract:] Stellar activity data provide evidence of activity wave branches propagating polewards rather than equatorwards (the solar case). Stellar dynamo theory allows polewards propagating dynamo waves for certain governing parameters. We try to unite observations and theory, restricting our investigation to the simplest mean-field dynamo models. We suggest a crude preliminary systematization of the reported cases of polar activity branches. Then we present results of dynamo model simulations which contain magnetic structures with polar dynamo waves, and identify the models which look most promising for explaining the latitudinal distribution of spots in dwarf stars. Those models require specific features of stellar rotation laws, and so observations of polar activity branches may constrain internal stellar rotation. Specifically, we find it unlikely that a pronounced poleward branch can be associated with a solar-like internal rotation profile, while it can be more readily reproduced in the case of a cylindrical rotation law appropriate for fast rotators. We stress the case of the subgiant component of the active close binary HR 1099 which, being best investigated, presents the most severe problems for a dynamo interpretation. Our best model requires dynamo action in two layers separated in radius. Observations of polar activity branches provide valuable information for understanding stellar activity mechanisms and internal rotation, and thus deserve intensive observational and theoretical investigation. Current stellar dynamo theory seems sufficiently robust to accommodate the phenomenology.
  • We consider to what extent the long-term dynamics of cyclic solar activity in the form of Grand Minima can be associated with random fluctuations of the parameters governing the solar dynamo. We consider fluctuations of the alpha-coefficient in the conventional Parker migratory dynamo, and also in slightly more sophisticated dynamo models, and demonstrate that they can mimic the gross features of the phenomenon of the occurrence of Grand Minima over a suitable parameter range. The temporal distribution of these Grand Minima appears chaotic, with a more or less exponential waiting time distribution, typical of Poisson processes. In contrast however, the available reconstruction of Grand Minima statistics based on cosmogenic isotope data demonstrates substantial deviations from this exponential law. We were unable to reproduce the non-Poissonic tail of the waiting time distribution either in the framework of a simple alpha-quenched Parker model, or in its straightforward generalization, nor in simple models with feedback on the differential rotation. We suggest that the disagreement may only be apparent and is plausibly related to the limited observational data, and that the observations and results of numerical modeling can be consistent and represent physically similar dynamo regimes.
  • The motivation for considering distributed large scale dynamos in the solar context is reviewed in connection with the magnetic helicity constraint. Preliminary accounts of 3-dimensional direct numerical simulations (in spherical shell segments) and simulations of 2-dimensional mean field models (in spherical shells) are presented. Interesting similarities as well as some differences are noted.
  • We present the results of a deep 610 MHz survey of the 1^H XMM/Chandra survey area with the GMRT. The resulting maps have a resolution of ~7 arcsec and an rms noise limit of 60 microJy. To a 5 sigma detection limit of 300 microJy we detect 223 sources within a survey area of diameter 64 arcmin. We compute the 610 MHz source counts and compare them to those measured at other radio wavelengths. The well know flattening of the Euclidean-normalised 1.4 GHz source counts below ~2 mJy, usually explained by a population of starburst galaxies undergoing luminosity evolution, is seen at 610 MHz. The 610 MHz source counts can be modelled by the same populations that explain the 1.4 GHz source counts, assuming a spectral index of -0.7 for the starburst galaxies and the steep spectrum AGN population. We find a similar dependence of luminosity evolution on redshift for the starburst galaxies at 610 MHz as is found at 1.4 GHz (i.e. 'Q'= 2.45 (+0.3,-0.4)).
  • We present a model of the global magnetic field in the barred galaxy NGC 1365 based jointly on the large-scale velocity field of interstellar gas fitted to HI and CO observations of this galaxy and on mean-field dynamo theory. The aim of the paper is to present a detailed quantitative comparison of a galactic dynamo model with independent radio observations. We consider several gas dynamical and nonlinear dynamo models that include plausible variations of parameters that are poorly known. Models of cosmic ray distribution in the galaxy are introduced to produce synthetic radio polarization maps allowing direct comparison with those observed at 3.5cm and 6.2cm. We show that the dynamo model is robust in that the most important magnetic features are controlled by the relatively well established properties of the density distribution and gas velocity field. The optimal agreement between the synthetic polarization maps and observations is obtained when a uniform cosmic ray distribution is adopted. We find some indirect evidence for enhanced turbulence in the regions of strong velocity shear and within 1-2kpc of the galactic centre. We confirm that magnetic stresses can drive an inflow of gas into the inner 1kpc of the galaxy at a rate of a few solar masses per year. The dynamo models are successful to some extent in modelling the large scale regular magnetic field in this galaxy. Our results demonstrate that dynamo models and synthetic polarization maps can provide information about both the gas dynamical models and conditions in the interstellar medium. We demonstrate that the dynamical effects of magnetic fields cannot be everywhere ignored in galaxy modelling.
  • We present the X-ray spectra of 86 optically-identified sources in the 13H XMM-Newton/Chandra deep field which have >70 X-ray counts. The sample consists of 50 broad line AGN, 25 narrow emission line galaxies, 6 absorption line galaxies, and 5 Galactic stars. The majority (42/50) of the broad line AGN have X-ray spectra which are consistent with a power law shape. They have a mean photon index of Gamma = 2.0 +- 0.1 and an intrinsic dispersion sigma = 0.4 +- 0.1. Five BLAGN show a deficit of soft X-rays, indicating absorption. Significant absorption is more common in the narrow emission line galaxies (13/25) and absorption line galaxies (2/6) than in the broad line AGN (5/50), but is not universal in any of these classes of object. The majority of the 20 absorbed sources have X-ray spectra consistent with a simple cold photoelectric absorber, but 6/20 require more complex models with either an additional component of soft X-ray emitting plasma, or an ionised absorber. Of the 16 galaxies which do not show evidence for X-ray absorption, only 2 objects are likely to be powered by star formation, and both have 2-10 keV X-ray luminosities of <= 10^40 cgs. The X-ray emission in the other 14 unabsorbed NELGs and galaxies is most likely powered by AGN, which are not detected in the optical because they are outshone by their luminous host galaxies. The Galactic stars show multi-temperature thermal spectra which peak between 0.5 and 1 keV. Star/AGN discrimination is possible for 4 of the 5 stars solely from their X-ray spectra.
  • A fraction of solar active regions are observed to have current helicity of a sign that contradicts the polarity law for magnetic helicity; this law corresponds to the well-known Hale polarity law for sunspots. A significant excess of active regions with the "wrong" sign of helicity is seen to occur just at the beginning of the cycle. We compare these observations with predictions from a dynamo model based on principles of helicity conservation, discussed by Zhang et al. (2006). This model seems capable of explaining only a fraction of the regions with the wrong sign of the helicity. We attribute the remaining excess to additional current helicity production from the twisting of rising magnetic flux tubes, as suggested by Choudhuri et al. (2004). We estimate the relative contributions of this effect and that connected with the model based on magnetic helicity conservation.
  • We present the results of a deep X-ray survey conducted with XMM-Newton, centred on the UK ROSAT 13H deep field area. This region covers 0.18 deg^2 and is the first of two areas covered with XMM-Newton as part of an extensive multi-wavelength survey designed to study the nature and evolution of the faint X-ray source population. We have produced detailed Monte-Carlo simulations to obtain a quantitative characterisation of the source detection procedure and to assess the reliability of the resultant sourcelist. We use the simulations to establish a likelihood threshold above which we expect less than 7 (3%) of our sources to be spurious. We present the final catalogue of 225 sources. Within the central 9 arcmin, 68 per cent of source positions are accurate to 2 arcsec, making optical follow-up relatively straightforward. We construct the N(>S) relation in four energy bands: 0.2-0.5 keV, 0.5-2 keV, 2-5 keV and 5-10 keV. In all but our highest energy band we find that the source counts can be represented by a double powerlaw with a bright end slope consistent with the Euclidean case and a break around 10^-14 cgs. Below this flux the counts exhibit a flattening. Our source counts reach densities of 700, 1300, 900 and 300 deg^-2 at fluxes of 4.1x10^-16, 4.5x10^-16, 1.1x10^-15 and 5.3x10^-15 cgs in the 0.2-0.5, 0.5-2, 2-5 and 5-10 keV energy bands respectively. We have compared our source counts with those in the two Chandra deep fields and Lockman hole and find our source counts to be amongst the highest of these fields in all energy bands. We resolve >51% (>50%) of the X-ray background emission in the 1-2 keV (2-5 keV) energy bands.
  • We continue our attempt to connect observational data on current helicity in solar active regions with solar dynamo models. In addition to our previous results about temporal and latitudinal distributions of current helicity (Kleeorin et al. 2003), we argue that some information concerning the radial profile of the current helicity averaged over time and latitude can be extracted from the available observations. The main feature of this distribution can be presented as follows. Both shallow and deep active regions demonstrate a clear dominance of one sign of current helicity in a given hemisphere during the whole cycle. Broadly speaking, current helicity has opposite polarities in the Northern and Southern hemispheres, although there are some active regions that violate this polarity rule. The relative number of active regions violating the polarity rule is significantly higher for deeper active regions. A separation of active regions into `shallow', `middle' and `deep' is made by comparing their rotation rate and the helioseismic rotation law. We use a version of Parker's dynamo model in two spatial dimensions, that employs a nonlinearity based on magnetic helicity conservation arguments. The predictions of this model about the radial distribution of solar current helicity appear to be in remarkable agreement with the available observational data; in particular the relative volume occupied by the current helicity of "wrong" sign grows significantly with the depth.
  • Increasing evidence is becoming available about not only the surface differential rotation of rapidly rotating cool stars but, in a small number of cases, also about temporal variations, which possibly are analogous to the solar torsional oscillations. Given the present difficulties in resolving the precise nature of such variations, due to both the short length and poor resolution of the available data, theoretical input is vital to help assess the modes of behaviour that might be expected, and will facilitate interpretation of the observations. Here we take a first step in this direction by studying the variations in the convection zones of such stars, using a two dimensional axisymmetric mean field dynamo model operating in a spherical shell in which the only nonlinearity is the action of the azimuthal component of the Lorentz force of the dynamo generated magnetic field on the stellar angular velocity. We consider three families of models with different depths of dynamo-active regions. For moderately supercritical dynamo numbers we find torsional oscillations that penetrate all the way down to the bottom of the convection zones, similar to the case of the Sun. For larger dynamo numbers we find fragmentation in some cases and sometimes there are other dynamical modes of behaviour, including quasi-periodicity and chaos. We find that the largest deviations in the angular velocity distribution caused by the Lorentz force are of the order of few percent, implying that the original assumed `background' rotation field is not strongly distorted.
  • We study a simple model for the solar dynamo in the framework of the Parker migratory dynamo, with a nonlinear dynamo saturation mechanism based on magnetic helicity conservation arguments. We find a parameter range in which the model demonstrates a cyclic behaviour with properties similar to that of Parker dynamo with the simplest form of algebraic alpha-quenching. We compare the nonlinear current helicity evolution in this model with data for the current helicity evolution obtained during 10 years of observations at the Huairou Solar Station of China. On one hand, our simulated data demonstrate behaviour comparable with the observed phenomenology, provided that a suitable set of governing dynamo parameters is chosen. On the other hand, the observational data are shown to be rich enough to reject some other sets of governing parameters. We conclude that, in spite of the very preliminary state of the observations and the crude nature of the model, the idea of using observational data to constrain our ideas concerning magnetic field generation in the framework of the solar dynamo appears promising.
  • We have extended our previous mean-field galactic dynamo model which included algebraic and dynamic alpha nonlinearities (Kleeorin et al., A&A, v. 387, 453, 2002), to include also a quenching of turbulent diffusivity. We readily obtain equilibrium states for the large-scale magnetic field in the local disc dynamo model, and these fields have strengths that are comparable to the equipartition field strength. We find that the algebraic nonlinearity alone (i.e. quenching of both the alpha effect and turbulent magnetic diffusion) cannot saturate the growth of the mean magnetic field; only the combined effect of algebraic and dynamic nonlinearities can limit the growth of the mean magnetic field. However, in contrast to our earlier work without quenching of the turbulent diffusivity, we cannot now find satisfactory solutions in the no-z approximation to the axisymmetric galactic dynamo problem.
  • We demonstrate that the inclusion of the helicity flux in the magnetic helicity balance in the nonlinear stage of galactic dynamo action results in a radical change in the magnetic field dynamics. The equilibrium value of the large-scale magnetic field is then approximately the equipartition level. This is in contrast to the situation without the flux of helicity, when the magnetic helicity is conserved locally, which leads to substantially subequipartition values for the equilibrium large-scale magnetic field.
  • We consider the magnetic helicity balance for the galactic dynamo in the framework of the local dynamo problem, as well as in the no-z model (which includes explicitly the radial distribution of the magnetic fields). When calculating the magnetic helicity balance we take into account the redistribution of the small-scale and large-scale magnetic fields between the magnetic helicities, as well as magnetic helicity transport and diffusion due to small-scale turbulence. We demonstrate that the magnetic helicity flux through the galactic disc boundaries leads to a steady-state magnetic field with magnetic energy comparable to the equipartition energy of the turbulent motions of the interstellar medium. If such flux is ignored, the steady-state magnetic field is found to be much smaller than the equipartition field. The total magnetic helicity flux through the boundaries consists of both an advective flux and a diffusive flux. The exact ratio of these contributions seems not to be crucial for determining the strength of the steady-state magnetic field and its structure. However at least some diffusive contribution is needed to smooth the magnetic helicity profile near to the disc boundaries. The roles of various transport coefficients for magnetic helicity are investigated, and the values which lead to magnetic field configurations comparable with those observed are determined.
  • We report our first results on comparing the variations of the solar internal rotation with solar activity, as predicted by non-linear solar dynamo modelling, with helioseismic measurements using the SOHO MDI data.
  • We study the generation and maintenance of large-scale magnetic fields in barred galaxies. We take a velocity field (with strong noncircular components) from a published gas dynamical simulation of Athanassoula (1992), and use this as input to a galactic dynamo calculation. Our work is largely motivated by recent high quality VLA radio observations of the barred galaxy NGC 1097, and we compare our results in detail with the regular magnetic fields deduced from these observations. We are able to reproduce most of the conspicuous large-scale features of the observed regular field, including the field structure in the central regions, by using a simple mean-field dynamo model in which the intensity of interstellar turbulence (more precisely, the turbulent diffusivity) is enhanced by a factor of 2-6 in the dust lanes and near the circumnuclear ring. We argue that magnetic fields can be dynamically important, and therefore should be included in models of gas flow in barred galaxies.