• F. Acero, J.-T. Acquaviva, R. Adam, N. Aghanim, M. Allen, M. Alves, R. Ammanouil, R. Ansari, A. Araudo, E. Armengaud, B. Ascaso, E. Athanassoula, D. Aubert, S. Babak, A. Bacmann, A. Banday, K. Barriere, F. Bellossi, J.-P. Bernard, M. G. Bernardini, M. Béthermin, E. Blanc, L. Blanchet, J. Bobin, S. Boissier, C. Boisson, A. Boselli, A. Bosma, S. Bosse, S. Bottinelli, F. Boulanger, R. Boyer, A. Bracco, C. Briand, M. Bucher, V. Buat, L. Cambresy, M. Caillat, J.-M. Casandjian, E. Caux, S. Célestin, M. Cerruti, P. Charlot, E. Chassande-Mottin, S. Chaty, N. Christensen, L. Ciesla, N. Clerc, J. Cohen-Tanugi, I. Cognard, F. Combes, B. Comis, S. Corbel, B. Cordier, M. Coriat, R. Courtin, H. Courtois, B. Da Silva, E. Daddi, R. Dallier, E. Dartois, K. Demyk, J.-M. Denis, L. Denis, A. Djannati-Ataï, J.-F. Donati, M. Douspis, W. van Driel, M. N. El Korso, E. Falgarone, A. Fantina, T. Farges, A. Ferrari, C. Ferrari, K. Ferrière, R. Flamary, N. Gac, S. Gauffre, F. Genova, J. Girard, I. Grenier, J.-M. Griessmeier, P. Guillard, L. Guillemot, F. Gulminelli, A. Gusdorf, E. Habart, F. Hammer, P. Hennebelle, F. Herpin, O. Hervet, A. Hughes, O. Ilbert, M. Janvier, E. Josselin, A. Julier, C. Lachaud, G. Lagache, R. Lallement, S. Lambert, L. Lamy, M. Langer, P. Larzabal, G. Lavaux, T. Le Bertre, O. Le Fèvre, A. Le Tiec, B. Lefloch, M. Lehnert, M. Lemoine-Goumard, F. Levrier, M. Limousin, D. Lis, A. López-Sepulcre, J. Macias-Perez, C. Magneville, A. Marcowith, J. Margueron, G. Marquette, D. Marshall, L. Martin, D. Mary, S. Masson, S. Maurogordato, C. Mazauric, Y. Mellier, M.-A. Miville-Deschênes, L. Montier, F. Mottez, D. Mourard, N. Nesvadba, J.-F. Nezan, P. Noterdaeme, J. Novak, P. Ocvirk, M. Oertel, X. Olive, V. Ollier, N. Palanque-Delabrouille, M. Pandey-Pommier, Y. Pennec, M. Pérault, C. Peroux, P. Petit, J. Pétri, A. Petiteau, J. Pety, G. W. Pratt, M. Puech, B. Quertier, E. Raffin, S. Rakotozafy Harison, S. Rawson, M. Renaud, B. Revenu, C. Richard, J. Richard, F. Rincon, I. Ristorcelli, J. Rodriguez, M. Schultheis, C. Schimd, B. Semelin, H. Sol, J.-L. Starck, M. Tagger, C. Tasse, G. Theureau, S. Torchinsky, C. Vastel, S. D. Vergani, L. Verstraete, X. Vigouroux, N. Vilmer, J.-P. Vilotte, N. Webb, N. Ysard, P. Zarka
    March 28, 2018 astro-ph.IM
    The "Square Kilometre Array" (SKA) is a large international radio telescope project characterised, as suggested by its name, by a total collecting area of approximately one square kilometre, and consisting of several interferometric arrays to observe at metric and centimetric wavelengths. The deployment of the SKA will take place in two sites, in South Africa and Australia, and in two successive phases. From its Phase 1, the SKA will be one of the most formidable scientific machines ever deployed by mankind, and by far the most impressive in terms of data throughput and required computing power. With the participation of almost 200 authors from forty research institutes and six private companies, the publication of this French SKA white paper illustrates the strong involvement in the SKA project of the French astronomical community and of a rapidly growing number of major scientific and technological players in the fields of Big Data, high performance computing, energy production and storage, as well as system integration.
  • Large stellar surveys of the Milky Way require validation with reference to a set of "benchmark" stars whose fundamental properties are well-determined. For metal-poor benchmark stars, disagreement between spectroscopic and interferometric effective temperatures has called the reliability of the temperature scale into question. We present new interferometric measurements of three metal-poor benchmark stars, HD 140283, HD 122563, and HD 103095, from which we determine their effective temperatures. The angular sizes of all the stars were determined from observations with the PAVO beam combiner at visible wavelengths at the CHARA array, with additional observations of HD 103095 made with the VEGA instrument, also at the CHARA array. Together with photometrically derived bolometric fluxes, the angular diameters give a direct measurement of the effective temperature. For HD 140283 we find {\theta}_LD = 0.324+/-0.005 mas, Teff = 5787+/-48 K; for HD 122563, {\theta}_LD = 0.926+/-0.011 mas, Teff = 4636+/-37 K; and for HD 103095 {\theta}_LD = 0.595+/-0.007 mas, Teff = 5140+/-49 K. Our temperatures for HD 140283 and HD 103095 are hotter than the previous interferometric measurements by 253 K and 322 K, respectively. We find good agreement between our temperatures and recent spectroscopic and photometric estimates. We conclude some previous interferometric measurements have been affected by systematic uncertainties larger than their quoted errors.
  • Context. Red giant branch (RGB) stars are very bright objects in galaxies and are often used as standard candles. Interferometry is the ideal tool to characterize the dynamics and morphology of their atmospheres. Aims. We aim at precisely characterising the surface dynamics of a sample of RGB stars. Methods. We obtained interferometric observations for three RGB stars with the MIRC instrument mounted at the CHARA interfer- ometer. We looked for asymmetries on the stellar surfaces using limb-darkening models. Results. We measured the apparent diameters of HD197989 (Epsilon Cyg) = 4.61+-0.02 mas, HD189276 (HR7633) = 2.95+-0.01 mas, and HD161096 (Beta Oph) = 4.43+-0.01 mas. We detected departures from the centrosymmetric case for all three stars with the tendency of a greater effect for lower logg of the sample. We explored the causes of this signal and conclude that a possible explanation to the interferometric signal is the convection-related and/or the magnetic-related surface activity. However, it is necessary to monitor these stars with new observations, possibly coupled with spectroscopy, in order to firmly establish the cause.
  • The projection factor p is the key quantity used in the Baade-Wesselink (BW) method for distance determination; it converts radial velocities into pulsation velocities. Several methods are used to determine p, such as geometrical and hydrodynamical models or the inverse BW approach when the distance is known. We analyze new HARPS-N spectra of delta Cep to measure its cycle-averaged atmospheric velocity gradient in order to better constrain the projection factor. We first apply the inverse BW method to derive p directly from observations. The projection factor can be divided into three subconcepts: (1) a geometrical effect (p0); (2) the velocity gradient within the atmosphere (fgrad); and (3) the relative motion of the optical pulsating photosphere with respect to the corresponding mass elements (fo-g). We then measure the fgrad value of delta Cep for the first time. When the HARPS-N mean cross-correlated line-profiles are fitted with a Gaussian profile, the projection factor is pcc-g = 1.239 +/- 0.034(stat) +/- 0.023(syst). When we consider the different amplitudes of the radial velocity curves that are associated with 17 selected spectral lines, we measure projection factors ranging from 1.273 to 1.329. We find a relation between fgrad and the line depth measured when the Cepheid is at minimum radius. This relation is consistent with that obtained from our best hydrodynamical model of delta Cep and with our projection factor decomposition. Using the observational values of p and fgrad found for the 17 spectral lines, we derive a semi-theoretical value of fo-g. We alternatively obtain fo-g = 0.975+/-0.002 or 1.006+/-0.002 assuming models using radiative transfer in plane-parallel or spherically symmetric geometries, respectively. The new HARPS-N observations of delta Cep are consistent with our decomposition of the projection factor.
  • This work presents CHARA/VEGA H$\alpha$ spectro-interferometry (R ~ 6000, and $\lambda$/2B ~ 1 mas) of HD 179218 and HD 141569, doubling the sample of Herbig Ae/Be (HAeBe) stars for which this type of observations is available so far. The observed H$\alpha$ emission is spatially unresolved, indicating that the size of the H$\alpha$ emitting region is smaller than ~ 0.21 and 0.12 au for HD 179218 and HD 141529 (~ 15 and 16 R*, respectively). This is smaller than for the two other HAeBes previously observed with the same instrumentation. Two different scenarios have been explored in order to explain the compact line emitting regions. A hot, several thousand K, blackbody disc is consistent with the observations of HD 179218 and HD 141569. Magnetospheric accretion (MA) is able to reproduce the bulk of the H$\alpha$ emission shown by HD 179218, confirming previous estimates from MA shock modelling with a mass accretion rate of 10^-8 Msun/yr, and an inclination to the line of sight between 30 and 50 degr. The H$\alpha$ profile of HD 141569 cannot be fitted from MA due to the high rotational velocity of this object. Putting the CHARA sample together, a variety of scenarios is required to explain the H$\alpha$ emission in HAeBe stars -compact or extended, discs, accretion, and winds-, in agreement with previous Br$\gamma$ spectro-interferometric observations.
  • The B-W method is used to determine the distance of Cepheids and consists in combining the angular size variations of the star, as derived from infrared surface-brightness relations or interferometry, with its linear size variation, as deduced from visible spectroscopy using the projection factor. While many Cepheids have been intensively observed by infrared beam combiners, only a few have been observed in the visible. This paper is part of a project to observe Cepheids in the visible with interferometry as a counterpart to infrared observations already in hand. Observations of delta Cep itself were secured with the VEGA/CHARA instrument over the full pulsation cycle of the star. These visible interferometric data are consistent in first approximation with a quasi-hydrostatic model of pulsation surrounded by a static circumstellar environment (CSE) with a size of theta_cse=8.9 +/- 3.0 mas and a relative flux contribution of f_cse=0.07+/-0.01. A model of visible nebula (a background source filling the field of view of the interferometer) with the same relative flux contribution is also consistent with our data at small spatial frequencies. However, in both cases, we find discrepancies in the squared visibilities at high spatial frequencies (maximum 2sigma) with two different regimes over the pulsation cycle of the star, phi=0.0-0.8 and phi=0.8-1.0. We provide several hypotheses to explain these discrepancies, but more observations and theoretical investigations are necessary before a firm conclusion can be drawn. For the first time we have been able to detect in the visible domain a resolved structure around delta~Cep. We have also shown that a simple model cannot explain the observations, and more work will be necessary in the future, both on observations and modelling.
  • A classical nova occurs when material accreting onto the surface of a white dwarf in a close binary system ignites in a thermonuclear runaway. Complex structures observed in the ejecta at late stages could result from interactions with the companion during the common envelope phase. Alternatively, the explosion could be intrinsically bipolar, resulting from a localized ignition on the surface of the white dwarf or as a consequence of rotational distortion. Studying the structure of novae during the earliest phases is challenging because of the high spatial resolution needed to measure their small sizes. Here we report near-infrared interferometric measurements of the angular size of Nova Delphini 2013, starting from one day after the explosion and continuing with extensive time coverage during the first 43 days. Changes in the apparent expansion rate can be explained by an explosion model consisting of an optically thick core surrounded by a diffuse envelope. The optical depth of the ejected material changes as it expands. We detect an ellipticity in the light distribution, suggesting a prolate or bipolar structure that develops as early as the second day. Combining the angular expansion rate with radial velocity measurements, we derive a geometric distance to the nova of 4.54 +/- 0.59 kpc from the Sun.
  • The rapidly rotating Be star phi Persei was spun up by mass and angular momentum transfer from a now stripped-down, hot subdwarf companion. Here we present the first high angular resolution images of phi Persei made possible by new capabilities in longbaseline interferometry at near-IR and visible wavelengths. We observed phi Persei with the MIRC and VEGA instruments of the CHARA Array. Additional MIRC-only observations were performed to track the orbital motion of the companion, and these were fit together with new and existing radial velocity measurements of both stars to derive the complete orbital elements and distance. The hot subdwarf companion is clearly detected in the near-IR data at each epoch of observation with a flux contribution of 1.5% in the H band, and restricted fits indicate that its flux contribution rises to 3.3% in the visible. A new binary orbital solution is determined by combining the astrometric and radial velocity measurements. The derived stellar masses are 9.6+-0.3Msol and 1.2+-0.2Msol for the Be primary and subdwarf secondary, respectively. The inferred distance (186 +- 3 pc), kinematical properties, and evolutionary state are consistent with membership of phi Persei in the alpha Per cluster. From the cluster age we deduce significant constraints on the initial masses and evolutionary mass transfer processes that transformed the phi Persei binary system. The interferometric data place strong constraints on the Be disk elongation, orientation, and kinematics, and the disk angular momentum vector is coaligned with and has the same sense of rotation as the orbital angular momentum vector. The VEGA visible continuum data indicate an elongated shape for the Be star itself, due to the combined effects of rapid rotation, partial obscuration of the photosphere by the circumstellar disk, and flux from the bright inner disk.
  • We determined the fundamental properties of HD 140283 by obtaining new interferometric and spectroscopic measurements and combining them with photometry from the literature. The interferometric measurements were obtained using the visible interferometer VEGA on the CHARA array and we determined a 1D limb-darkened angular diameter of 0.353 +/- 0.013 milliarcseconds. Using photometry from the literature we derived the bolometric flux with two solutions: a zero-reddening one of Fbol = 3.890 +/- 0.066 1E-8 erg/s/cm2 and a solution with a maximum of Av = 0.1 mag, Fbol= 4.220 +/- 0.067 1E-8 erg/s/cm2. The interferometric Teff is thus 5534 +/- 103 K or 5647 +/- 105 K and its radius is R = 2.21 +/- 0.08 Rsol. Spectroscopic measurements of HD140283 were obtained using HARPS, NARVAL, and UVES and a 1D LTE analysis of H-alpha line wings yields Teff(Halpha) = 5626 +/- 75 K. Using fine-tuned stellar models including diffusion of elements we then determined the mass M and age t of HD140283. Once the metallicity has been fixed, the age of the star depends on M, initial helium abundance Yi and mixing-length parameter alpha, only two of which are independent. We need to adjust alpha to much lower values than the solar one (~2) in order to fit the observations, and if Av = 0.0 mag then 0.5 < alpha < 1. We give an equation to estimate t from M, Yi (alpha) and Av. Establishing a reference alpha = 1.00 and adopting Yi = 0.245 we derive a mass and age of HD140283: M = 0.780 +/- 0.010 Msol and t = 13.7 +/- 0.7 Gyr (Av = 0.0) or M = 0.805 +/- 0.010 Msol and t = 12.2 +/- 0.6 Gyr (Av=0.1 mag). Our stellar models yield an initial metallicity of [Z/X]i = -1.70 and logg = 3.65 +/- 0.03. Asteroseismic observations are critical for overcoming limitations in our results.
  • Stellar activity causes difficulties in the characterization of transiting exoplanets. Studies have been performed to quantify its impact on infrared interferometry, but not in the visible domain, which however allows reaching better angular resolution and is also the one mostly used for spectroscopic and photometric measurements. We use a standard case to completely analyse the impact of an exoplanet and a spot on interferometric observables and relate it to current instrument capabilities, taking into account realistic achievable precisions. We built a numerical code called COMETS using analytical formulae to perform a simple comparison of exoplanet and spot signals. We explore instrumental specificities needed to detect them, like the baseline length required, the accuracy and S/N. We also discuss the impact of exoplanet and spot parameters on squared visibility and phase. We find that the main improvement to bring is the sensitivity of instruments. The accuracy on squared visibilities has to be improved by a factor 10 to detect an exoplanet of 0.1 mas, leading to $<0.5%$ precision, along with phase measurements of ~$5^{\deg}$ accuracy beyond the first null of visibility. For a 0.05 mas exoplanet, accuracies of ~$0.1%$ and ~$1^{\deg}$ from the first null are required on squared visibilities and phases, respectively. Magnetic spots can mimic these signals, leading to false exoplanet characterization. Phases measurements from the 3rd lobe is needed to distinguish between a spot and an exoplanet if they have the same radius. Increasing interferometer sensitivity, more objects will become common between interferometric targets and photometric ones. Furthermore, new missions like PLATO, CHEOPS or TESS will provide bright exoplanet host stars. Measurements will thus overlap and provide a better characterization of stellar activity and exoplanet.
  • HD 50138 is a B[e] star surrounded by a large amount of circumstellar gas and dust. Its spectrum shows characteristics which may indicate either a pre- or a post-main-sequence system. Mapping the kinematics of the gas in the inner few au of the system contributes to a better understanding of its physical nature. We present the first high spatial and spectral resolution interferometric observations of the Br-gamma line of HD~50138, obtained with VLTI/AMBER. The line emission originates from a region more compact (up to 3 au) than the continuum-emitting region. Blue- and red-shifted emission originates from the two different hemispheres of an elongated structure perpendicular to the polarization angle. The velocity of the emitting medium decreases radially. An overall offset along the NW direction between the line- and continuum-emitting regions is observed. We compare the data with a geometric model of a thin Keplerian disk and a spherical halo on top of a Gaussian continuum. Most of the data are well reproduced by this model, except for the variability, the global offset and the visibility at the systemic velocity. The evolutionary state of the system is discussed; most diagnostics are ambiguous and may point either to a post-main-sequence or a pre-main-sequence nature.
  • The aim of this work is to improve the SBC relation for early-type stars in the $-1 \leq V-K \leq 0$ color domain, using optical interferometry. Observations of eight B- and A-type stars were secured with the VEGA/CHARA instrument in the visible. The derived uniform disk angular diameters were converted into limb darkened angular diameters and included in a larger sample of 24 stars, already observed by interferometry, in order to derive a revised empirical relation for O, B, A spectral type stars with a V-K color index ranging from -1 to 0. We also took the opportunity to check the consistency of the SBC relation up to $V-K \simeq 4$ using 100 additional measurements. We determined the uniform disk angular diameter for the eight following stars: $\gamma$ Ori, $\zeta$ Per, $8$ Cyg, $\iota$ Her, $\lambda$ Aql, $\zeta$ Peg, $\gamma$ Lyr, and $\delta$ Cyg with V-K color ranging from -0.70 to 0.02 and typical precision of about $1.5\%$. Using our total sample of 132 stars with $V-K$ colors index ranging from about $-1$ to $4$, we provide a revised SBC relation. For late-type stars ($0 \leq V-K \leq 4$), the results are consistent with previous studies. For early-type stars ($-1 \leq V-K \leq 0$), our new VEGA/CHARA measurements combined with a careful selection of the stars (rejecting stars with environment or stars with a strong variability), allows us to reach an unprecedented precision of about 0.16 magnitude or $\simeq 7\%$ in terms of angular diameter.
  • Due to the strong magnetic field and related abnormal surface layers existing in rapidly oscillating Ap stars, systematic errors are likely to be present when determining their effective temperatures, which potentially compromises asteroseismic studies of these pulsators. Using long-baseline interferometry, our goal is to determine accurate angular diameters of a number of roAp targets to provide a temperature calibration for these stars. We obtained interferometric observations of 10 Aql with the visible spectrograph VEGA at the CHARA array. We determined a limb-darkened angular diameter of 0.275+/-0.009 mas and deduced a linear radius of 2.32+/-0.09 R_sun. We estimated the star's bolometric flux and used it, in combination with its parallax and angular diameter, to determine the star's luminosity and effective temperature. For two data sets of bolometric flux we derived an effective temperature of 7800+/-170 K and a luminosity of 18+/-1 L_sun or of 8000+/-210 K and 19+/-2 L_sun. We used these fundamental parameters together with the large frequency separation to constrain the mass and the age of 10 Aql, using the CESAM stellar evolution code. Assuming a solar chemical composition and ignoring all kinds of diffusion and settling of elements, we obtained a mass of 1.92 M_sun and an age of 780 Gy or a mass of 1.95 M_sun and an age of 740 Gy, depending on the considered bolometric flux. For the first time, we managed to determine an accurate angular diameter for a star smaller than 0.3 mas and to derive its fundamental parameters. In particular, by only combining our interferometric data and the bolometric flux, we derived an effective temperature that can be compared to those derived from atmosphere models. Such fundamental parameters can help for testing the mechanism responsible for the excitation of the oscillations observed in the magnetic pulsating stars.
  • Binary post-AGB stars are interesting laboratories to study both the evolution of binaries as well as the structure of circumstellar disks. A multiwavelength high angular resolution study of the prototypical object 89 Herculis is performed with the aim of identifying and locating the different emission components seen in the SED. A large interferometric data set, collected over the past decade and covering optical and near-IR wavelengths, is analyzed with simple geometric models. Combining the interferometric constraints with the photometry and the optical spectra, we reassess the energy budget of the post-AGB star and its circumstellar environment. We report the first (direct) detection of a large (35-40%) optical circumstellar flux contribution and spatially resolve its emission region. Given this large amount of reprocessed and/or redistributed optical light, the fitted size of the emission region is rather compact and fits with(in) the inner rim of the circumbinary dust disk. This rim dominates our K band data through thermal emission and is rather compact, emitting significantly already at a radius of twice the orbital separation. We interpret the circumstellar optical flux as due to a scattering process, with the scatterers located in the extremely puffed-up inner rim of the disk and possibly also in a bipolar outflow seen pole-on. A non-LTE gaseous origin in an inner disk cannot be excluded but is considered highly unlikely. This direct detection of a significant amount of circumbinary light at optical wavelengths poses several significant questions regarding our understanding of both post-AGB binaries and the physics in their circumbinary disks. Although the identification of the source of emission/scattering remains inconclusive without further study on this and similar objects, the implications are manifold.
  • Young close binaries clear central cavities in their surrounding circumbinary disk from which the stars can still accrete material. This process takes place within the very first astronomical units, and is still not well constrained as the observational evidence has been gathered, until now, only by means of spectroscopy. The young object HD200775 (MWC361) is a massive spectroscopic binary (separation of ~15.9mas, ~5.0~AU), with uncertain classification (early/late Be), that shows a strong and variable Halpha emission. We aim to study the mechanisms that produce the Halpha line at the AU-scale. Combining the radial velocity measurements and astrometric data available in the literature, we determined new orbital parameters. With the VEGA instrument on the CHARA array, we spatially and spectrally resolved the Halpha emission of HD200775, at low and medium spectral resolutions (R~1600 and 5000) over a full orbital period (~3.6 years). We observe that the Halpha equivalent width varies with the orbital phase, and increases close to periastron, as expected from theoretical models that predict an increase of the mass transfer from the circumbinary disk to the primary disk. In addition, using spectral visibilities and differential phases, we find marginal variations of the typical extent of the Halpha emission (at 1 to 2-sigma level) and location (at 1 to 5-sigma level). The spatial extent of the Halpha emission, as probed by a Gaussian FWHM, is minimum at the ascending node (0.67+/-0.20 mas, i.e., 0.22+/-0.06 AU), and more than doubles at periastron. In addition, the Gaussian photocenter is slightly displaced in the direction opposite to the secondary, ruling out the scenario in which all or most of the Halpha emission is due to accretion onto the secondary. These findings, together with the wide Halpha line profile, may be due to a non-spherical wind enhanced at periastron.
  • High-resolution spectroscopy of pulsating stars is a powerful tool to study the dynamical structure of their atmosphere. Lines asymmetry is used to derive the center-of-mass velocity of the star, while a direct measurement of the atmospheric velocity gradient helps determine the projection factor used in the Baade-Wesselink method of distance determination. We aim at deriving the center-of-mass velocity and the projection factor of the beta-Cephei star alpha-Lup. We present HARPS high spectral resolution observations of alpha-Lup. We calculate the first-moment radial velocities and fit the spectral line profiles by a bi-Gaussian to derive line asymmetries. Correlations between the gamma-velocity and the gamma-asymmetry (defined as the average values of the radial velocity and line asymmetry curves respectively) are used to derive the center-of-mass velocity of the star. By combining our spectroscopic determination of the atmospheric velocity gradient with a hydrodynamical modelof the photosphere of the star, we derive a semi-theoretical projection factor for alpha Lup. We find a center-of-mass velocity of Vgamma = 7.9 +/- 0.6 km/s and that the velocity gradient in the atmosphere of alpha Lup isnull. We apply to alpha Lup the usual decomposition of the projection factor into three parts, p = p0 fgrad fog (originally developed for Cepheids), and derive a projection factor of p = 1.43 +/-0.01. By comparing our results with previous HARPS observations of classical Cepheids, we also point out a linear relation between the atmospheric velocity gradient and the amplitude of the radial velocity curve. Moreover, we observe a phase shift (Van Hoof effect), whereas alpha Lup has no velocity gradient.
  • Aims. The Baade-Wesselink method of distance determination is based on the oscillations of pulsating stars. The key parameter of this method is the projection factor used to convert the radial velocity into the pulsation velocity. Our analysis was aimed at deriving for the first time the projection factor of delta Scuti stars, using high-resolution spectra of the high-amplitude pulsator AI Vel and of the fast rotator beta Cas. Methods. The geometric component of the projection factor (i.e. p0) was calculated using a limb-darkening model of the intensity distribution for AI Vel, and a fast-rotator model for beta Cas. Then, using SOPHIE/OHP data for beta Cas and HARPS/ESO data for AI Vel, we compared the radial velocity curves of several spectral lines forming at different levels in the atmosphere and derived the velocity gradient associated to the spectral-line-forming regions in the atmosphere of the star. This velocity gradient was used to derive a dynamical projection factor p. Results. We find a flat velocity gradient for both stars and finally p = p0 = 1.44 for AI Vel and p = p0 = 1.41 for beta Cas. By comparing Cepheids and delta Scuti stars, these results bring valuable insights into the dynamical structure of pulsating star atmospheres. They suggest that the period-projection factor relation derived for Cepheids is also applicable to delta Scuti stars pulsating in a dominant radial mode.
  • Studying exoplanet host stars is of the utmost importance to establish the link between the presence of exoplanets around various types of stars and to understand the respective evolution of stars and exoplanets. Using the limb-darkened diameter (LDD) obtained from interferometric data, we determine the fundamental parameters of four exoplanet host stars. We are particularly interested in the F4 main-sequence star, {\theta} Cyg, for which Kepler has recently revealed solar-like oscillations that are unexpected for this type of star. Furthermore, recent photometric and spectroscopic measurements with SOPHIE and ELODIE (OHP) show evidence of a quasi-periodic radial velocity of \sim150 days. Models of this periodic change in radial velocity predict either a complex planetary system orbiting the star, or a new and unidentified stellar pulsation mode. We performed interferometric observations of {\theta} Cyg, 14 Andromedae, {\upsilon} Andromedae and 42 Draconis for two years with VEGA/CHARA (Mount Wilson, California) in several three-telescope configurations. We measured accurate limb darkened diameters and derived their radius, mass and temperature using empirical laws. We obtain new accurate fundamental parameters for stars 14 And, {\upsilon} And and 42 Dra. We also obtained limb darkened diameters with a minimum precision of \sim 1.3%, leading to minimum planet masses of Msini=5.33\pm 0.57, 0.62 \pm 0.09 and 3.79\pm0.29 MJup for 14 And b, {\upsilon} And b and 42 Dra b, respectively. The interferometric measurements of {\theta} Cyg show a significant diameter variability that remains unexplained up to now. We propose that the presence of these discrepancies in the interferometric data is caused by either an intrinsic variation of the star or an unknown close companion orbiting around it.
  • \gamma Cas is the prototypical classical Be star and is best known for its variable hard X-ray emission. To elucidate the reasons for this emission, we mounted a multiwavelength campaign in 2010 centered around 4 XMM observations. The observational techniques included long baseline optical interferometry (LBOI), monitoring by an Automated Photometric Telescope and Halpha observations. Because gamma Cas is also known to be in a binary, we measured Halpha radial velocities and redetermined its period as 203.55+/-0.2 days and an eccentricity near zero. The LBOI observations suggest that the star's decretion disk was axisymmetric in 2010, has an inclination angle near 45^o, and a larger radius than previously reported. The Be star began an "outburst" at the beginning of our campaign, made visible by a disk brightening and reddening during our campaign. Our analyses of the new high resolution spectra disclosed many attributes found from spectra obtained in 2001 (Chandra) and 2004 (XMM). As well as a dominant hot 14 keV thermal component, these familiar ones included: (i) a fluorescent feature of Fe K stronger than observed at previous times, (ii) strong lines of N VII and Ne XI lines indicative of overabundances, and (iii) a subsolar Fe abundance from K-shell lines but a solar abundance from L-shell ions. We also found that 2 absorption columns are required to fit the continuum. While the first one maintained its historical average of 1X10^21 cm^-2, the second was very large and doubled to 7.4X10^23 cm^-2 during our X-ray observations. Although we found no clear relation between this column density and orbital phase, it correlates well with the disk brightening and reddening both in the 2010 and earlier observations. Thus, the inference from this study is that much (perhaps all?) of the X-ray emission from this source originates behind matter ejected by gamma Cas into our line of sight.
  • Studies are under way to propose a new generation of post-VLTI interferometers. The Carlina concept studied at the Haute- Provence Observatory is one of the proposed solutions. It consists in an optical interferometer configured like a diluted version of the Arecibo radio telescope: above the diluted primary mirror made of fixed cospherical segments, a helium balloon (or cables suspended between two mountains), carries a gondola containing the focal optics. Since 2003, we have been building a technical demonstrator of this diluted telescope. First fringes were obtained in May 2004 with two closely-spaced primary segments and a CCD on the focal gondola. We have been testing the whole optical train with three primary mirrors. The main aim of this article is to describe the metrology that we have conceived, and tested under the helium balloon to align the primary mirrors separate by 5-10 m on the ground with an accuracy of a few microns. The servo loop stabilizes the mirror of metrology under the helium balloon with an accuracy better than 5 mm while it moves horizontally by 30 cm in open loop by 10-20 km/h of wind. We have obtained the white fringes of metrology; i.e., the three mirrors are aligned (cospherized) with an accuracy of {\approx} 1 micron. We show data proving the stability of fringes over 15 minutes, therefore providing evidence that the mechanical parts are stabilized within a few microns. This is an important step that demonstrates the feasibility of building a diluted telescope using cables strained between cliffs or under a balloon. Carlina, like the MMT or LBT, could be one of the first members of a new class of telescopes named diluted telescopes.
  • Context. The interpretation of stellar pulsations in terms of internal structure depends on the knowledge of the fundamental stellar parameters. Long-base interferometers permit us to determine very accurate stellar radii, which are independent constraints for stellar models that help us to locate the star in the HR diagram. Aims: Using a direct interferometric determination of the angular diameter and advanced three-dimensional (3D) modeling, we derive the radius of the CoRoT target HD 49933 and reduce the global stellar parameter space compatible with seismic data. Methods: The VEGA/CHARA spectro-interferometer is used to measure the angular diameter of the star. A 3D radiative hydrodynamical simulation of the surface is performed to compute the limb darkening and derive a reliable diameter from visibility curves. The other fundamental stellar parameters (mass, age, and Teff) are found by fitting the large and small p-mode frequency separations using a stellar evolution model that includes microscopic diffusion. Results: We obtain a limb-darkened angular diameter of {\theta}LD = 0.445 \pm 0.012 mas. With the Hipparcos parallax, we obtain a radius of R = 1.42 \pm 0.04 Rsun. The corresponding stellar evolution model that fits both large and small frequency separations has a mass of 1.20 \pm 0.08 Msun and an age of 2.7 Gy. The atmospheric parameters are Teff = 6640 \pm 100 K, log g = 4.21 \pm 0.14, and [Fe/H] = -0.38.
  • Context. Recent observations of LMC Cepheids bring new constraints on the slope of the period-projection factor relation (hereafter Pp relation) that is currently used in the Baade-Wesselink (hereafter BW) method of distance determination. The discrepancy between observations and theoretical analysis is particularly significant for short period Cepheids Aims. We investigate three physical effects that might possibly explain this discrepancy: (1) the spectroscopic S/N that is systematically lower for LMC Cepheids (around 10) compared to Galactic ones (up to 300), (2) the impact of the metallicity on the dynamical structure of LMC Cepheids, and (3) the combination of infrared photometry/interferometry with optical spectroscopy. Methods. To study the S/N we use a very simple toy model of Cepheids. The impact of metallicity on the projection factor is based on the hydrodynamical model of delta Cep already described in previous studies. This model is also used to derive the position of the optical versus infrared photospheric layers. Results. We find no significant effect of S/N, metallicity, and optical-versus-infrared observations on the Pp relation. Conclusions. The Pp relation of Cepheids in the LMC does not differ from the Galactic relation. This allows its universal application to determine distances to extragalactic Cepheids via BW analysis.
  • We aim to constrain the geometrical extent of the chromosphere of non-binary K giant stars and detect any spatial structures in the chromosphere. We performed observations with the CHARA interferometer and the VEGA beam combiner at optical wavelengths. We observed seven non-binary K giant stars. We measured the ratio of the radii of the photosphere to the chromosphere using the interferometric measurements in the Halpha and the Ca II infrared triplet line cores. For beta Ceti, spectro-interferometric observations are compared to an non-local thermal equilibrium (NLTE) semi-empirical model atmosphere including a chromosphere. The NLTE computations provide line intensities and contribution functions that indicate the relative locations where the line cores are formed and can constrain the size of the limb-darkened disk of the stars with chromospheres. We measured the angular diameter of seven K giant stars and deduced their fundamental parameters: effective temperatures, radii, luminosities, and masses. We determined the geometrical extent of the chromosphere for four giant stars. The chromosphere extents obtained range between 16% to 47% of the stellar radius. The NLTE computations confirm that the Ca II/849 nm line core is deeper in the chromosphere of ? Cet than either of the Ca II/854 nm and Ca II/866 nm line cores. We present a modified version of a semi-empirical model atmosphere derived by fitting the Ca II triplet line cores of this star. In four of our targets, we also detect the signature of a differential signal showing the presence of asymmetries in the chromospheres. Conclusions. It is the first time that geometrical extents and structure in the chromospheres of non-binary K giant stars are determined by interferometry. These observations provide strong constrains on stellar atmosphere models.
  • The CHARA Array is a six 1-m telescope optical and near infrared interferometer located at the Mount Wilson Observatory in southern California and operated by the Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy of Georgia State University. The CHARA Array has been in regular scientific operation since 2005 and now has over 55 publications in the refereed literature, including two in Science and one in Nature. The Array now supports seven beam combiners ranging from 0.5 microns up to 2.3 microns and combing from 2 to 4 beams at a time. An upgrade to a full 6 beam combiner is now underway and fringes with all six telescopes were achieved soon after the meeting.We present some of the more recent results from the CHARA-Array.
  • Since the external regions of the envelopes of rapidly rotating early-type stars are unstable to convection, a coupling may exist between the convection and the internal rotation. We explore what can be learned from spectroscopic and interferometric observations about the properties of the rotation law in the external layers of these objects. Using simple relations between the entropy and specific rotational quantities, some of which are found to be efficient at accounting for the solar differential rotation in the convective region, we derived analytical solutions that represent possible differential rotations in the envelope of early-type stars. A surface latitudinal differential rotation may not only be an external imprint of the inner rotation, but induces changes in the stellar geometry, the gravitational darkening, the aspect of spectral line profiles, and the emitted spectral energy distribution. By studying the equation of the surface of stars with non-conservative rotation laws, we conclude that objects undergo geometrical deformations that are a function of the latitudinal differential rotation able to be scrutinized both spectroscopically and by interferometry. The combination of Fourier analysis of spectral lines with model atmospheres provides independent estimates of the surface latitudinal differential rotation and the inclination angle. Models of stars at different evolutionary stages rotating with internal conservative rotation laws were calculated to show that the Roche approximation can be safely used to account for the gravitational potential. The surface temperature gradient in rapid rotators induce an acceleration to the surface angular velocity. A non-zero differential rotation parameter may indicate that the rotation is neither rigid nor shellular underneath the stellar surface.