• We analyze GRB 151027A within the binary-driven hypernova (BdHN) approach, with progenitor a carbon-oxygen core on the verge of a supernova (SN) explosion and a binary companion neutron star (NS). The hypercritical accretion of the SN ejecta onto the NS leads to its gravitational collapse into a black hole (BH), to the emission of the GRB and to a copious $e^+e^-$ plasma. The impact of this $e^+e^-$ plasma on the SN ejecta explains the properties of \textit{\textbf{all}} early SXF observed in long GRBs. We here apply this approach to the UPE and to the HXFs. We use GRB 151027A as a prototype. From the time-integrated and the time-resolved analysis we identify a double component in the UPE and confirm its ultra-relativistic nature. We confirm the mildly-relativistic nature of the SXF, of the HXF and of the ETE. By a relativistic analysis, we show that the ETE identifies the transition from a SN to the HN. We then address the theoretical justification of these observations by integrating the hydrodynamical propagation equations of the $e^+ e^-$ into the SN ejecta, the latter independently obtained from 3D smoothed-particle-hydrodynamics simulations. We conclude that the UPE, the HXF and the SXF do not form a causally connected sequence. They are the manifestation of \textbf{the same} physical process of the BH formation as seen through different viewing angles, implied by the morphology and the $\sim 300$~s rotation period of the HN ejecta.
  • We address the significance of the observed GeV emission from \textit{Fermi}-LAT on the understanding of the structure of long GRBs. We examine 82 X-ray Flashs (XRFs), in none of them GeV radiation is observed, adding evidence to the absence of a black hole (BH) formation in their merging process. By examining $329$ Binary-driven Hypernovae (BdHNe) we find that out of $48$ BdHNe observable by \textit{Fermi}-LAT in \textit{only} $21$ of them the GeV emission is observed. The Gev emission in BdHNE follows a universal power-law relation between the luminosity and time, when measured in the rest frame of the source. The power-law index in BdHNe is of $-1.20 \pm 0.04$, very similar to the one discovered in S-GRBs, $-1.29 \pm 0.06$. The GeV emission originates from the newly-born BH and allows to determine its mass and spin. We further give the first evidence for observing a new GRB subclass originating from the merging of a hypernova (HN) and an already formed BH binary companion. We conclude that the GeV emission is a necessary and sufficient condition to confirm the presence of a BH in the hypercritical accretion process occurring in a HN. The remaining $27$ BdHNe, recently identified as sources of flaring in X-rays and soft gamma-rays, have no GeV emission. From this and previous works, we infer that the observability of the GeV emission in some BdHNe is hampered by the presence of the HN ejecta. We conclude that the GeV emission can only be detected when emitted within a half-opening angle $\approx$60$^{\circ}$ normal to the orbital plane of the BdHN.
  • The LIGO-Virgo Collaboration has announced the detection GW170817 and associated it with GRB 1709817A observed by the Fermi satellite and with the kilonova AT 2017gfo. We compare and contrast in this article the gravitational-wave and the electromagnetic emission associated with the sources GW170817A-GRB 170817A-AT 2017gfo with the ones observed in neutron star-neutron star (NS-NS) mergers, leading to a massive NS (the short gamma-ray flashes -- S-GRFs), the ones leading to a black hole (the short gamma-ray bursts -- S-GRBs) and we also consider the case of NS-white dwarf mergers (NS-WD; the gamma-ray flashes -- GRFs). As a byproduct of our analysis, we evidence a possible kilonova signature in S-GRBs associated with GRB 090510A, after we recall the examples occurring in S-GRF and GRFs. We show that the gravitational-wave emission of GW170817A could be compatible with the ones expected from S-GRFs and GRFs, but their gamma- and X-ray emissions are incompatible. With respect to GRFs, neither the gravitational-wave emission nor the X and gamma-rays are compatible. The expected rate of the particular kilonova AT 2017gfo excludes its association with any of the above subclasses and points to the existence of a new subclass of less energetic, numerous systems with softer spectra, possibly leading to the formation of a single spinning NS.
  • Within the classification of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in different subclasses we give further evidence that short bursts, originating from binary neutron star (B-NS) progenitors, exist in two subclasses: the short gamma-ray flashes (S-GRFs) and the short gamma-ray bursts (S-GRBs). It has already been shown that S-GRFs occur when the B-NS mergers lead to a massive neutron star (M-NS), having the isotropic energy $\lesssim$ $10^{52}$ erg and a soft spectrum with a peak at a value of $E_{\rm p,i}\sim 0.2$--$2$ MeV. Similarly, S-GRBs occur when B-NS merging leads to the formation of a black hole (BH), with isotropic energy $\gtrsim 10^{52}$ erg and a hard spectrum with a peak at a value of $E_{\rm p,i}\sim 2$--$8$ MeV. We here focus on 18 S-GRFs and 6 S-GRBs, all with known or derived cosmological redshifts following \textit{Fermi}-LAT observations. We evidence that \textit{all} S-GRFs have no GeV emission. The S-GRBs \textit{all} have GeV emission and their $0.1$--$100$ GeV luminosity light-curves as a function of time in the rest-frame follow a universal power-law, $L(t)= (0.88\pm 0.13) \times 10^{52}~t^{-(1.29 \pm 0.06)}$~erg~s$^{-1}$. From the mass formula of a Kerr BH we can correspondingly infer for S-GRBs a minimum BH mass in the range of $2.24$--$2.89 M_\odot$ and a corresponding maximum dimensionless spin in the range of $0.18$--$0.33$.
  • We analyze the early X-ray flares in the GRB "flare-plateau-afterglow" (FPA) phase observed by Swift-XRT. The FPA occurs only in one of the seven GRB subclasses: the binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe). This subclass consists of long GRBs with a carbon-oxygen core and a neutron star (NS) binary companion as progenitors. The hypercritical accretion of the supernova (SN) ejecta onto the NS can lead to the gravitational collapse of the NS into a black hole. Consequently, one can observe a GRB emission with isotropic energy $E_{iso}\gtrsim10^{52}$~erg, as well as the associated GeV emission and the FPA phase. Previous work had shown that gamma-ray spikes in the prompt emission occur at $\sim 10^{15}$--$10^{17}$~cm with Lorentz gamma factor $\Gamma\sim10^{2}$--$10^{3}$. Using a novel data analysis we show that the time of occurrence, duration, luminosity and total energy of the X-ray flares correlate with $E_{iso}$. A crucial feature is the observation of thermal emission in the X-ray flares that we show occurs at radii $\sim10^{12}$~cm with $\Gamma\lesssim 4$. These model independent observations cannot be explained by the "fireball" model, which postulates synchrotron and inverse Compton radiation from a single ultra relativistic jetted emission extending from the prompt to the late afterglow and GeV emission phases. We show that in BdHNe a collision between the GRB and the SN ejecta occurs at $\simeq10^{10}$~cm reaching transparency at $\sim10^{12}$~cm with $\Gamma\lesssim4$. The agreement between the thermal emission observations and these theoretically derived values validates our model and opens the possibility of testing each BdHN episode with the corresponding Lorentz gamma factor.
  • Theoretical and observational evidences have been recently gained for a two-fold classification of short bursts: 1) short gamma-ray flashes (S-GRFs), with isotropic energy $E_{iso}<10^{52}$~erg and no BH formation, and 2) the authentic short gamma-ray bursts (S-GRBs), with isotropic energy $E_{iso}>10^{52}$~erg evidencing a BH formation in the binary neutron star merging process. The signature for the BH formation consists in the on-set of the high energy ($0.1$--$100$~GeV) emission, coeval to the prompt emission, in all S-GRBs. No GeV emission is expected nor observed in the S-GRFs. In this paper we present two additional S-GRBs, GRB 081024B and GRB 140402A, following the already identified S-GRBs, i.e., GRB 090227B, GRB 090510 and GRB 140619B. We also return on the absence of the GeV emission of the S-GRB 090227B, at an angle of $71^{\rm{o}}$ from the \textit{Fermi}-LAT boresight. All the correctly identified S-GRBs correlate to the high energy emission, implying no significant presence of beaming in the GeV emission. The existence of a common power-law behavior in the GeV luminosities, following the BH formation, when measured in the source rest-frame, points to a commonality in the mass and spin of the newly-formed BH in all S-GRBs.