• We summarize the radio synchrotron background workshop that took place July 19-21, 2017 at the University of Richmond. This first scientific meeting dedicated to the topic was convened because current measurements of the diffuse radio monopole reveal a surface brightness that is several times higher than can be straightforwardly explained by known Galactic and extragalactic sources and processes, rendering it by far the least well understood photon background at present. It was the conclusion of a majority of the participants that the radio monopole level is at or near that reported by the ARCADE 2 experiment and inferred from several absolutely calibrated zero level lower frequency radio measurements, and unanimously agreed that the production of this level of surface brightness, if confirmed, represents a major outstanding question in astrophysics. The workshop reached a consensus on the next priorities for investigations of the radio synchrotron background.
  • We discuss the spectral analysis of a sample of 63 Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) detected above a limiting flux of $S(8-24$ keV$)=7\times10^{-14}$ erg/s/cm$^2$ in the multi-tiered NuSTAR Extragalactic Survey program. The sources span a redshift range z=0-2.1 (median $\langle$z$\rangle=$0.58). The spectral analysis is performed over the broad 0.5-24 keV energy range, combining NuSTAR with Chandra and/or XMM-Newton data and employing empirical and physically motivated models. This constitutes the largest sample of AGN selected at $ >10$ keV to be homogeneously spectrally analyzed at these flux levels. We study the distribution of spectral parameters such as photon index, column density ($N_{\rm H}$), reflection parameter ($R$) and 10-40 keV luminosity ($L_{X}$). Heavily obscured ($\log [N_{\rm H}/cm^{-2}]\ge23$) and Compton Thick (CT; $\log [N_{\rm H}/cm^{-2}]\ge24$) AGN constitute $\sim$25% (15-17 sources) and $\sim$2-3% ( 1-2 sources) of the sample, respectively. The observed $N_{\rm H}$ distribution fairly agrees with predictions of Cosmic X-ray Background population synthesis models (CXBPSM). We estimate the intrinsic fraction of AGN as a function of $N_{H}$, accounting for the bias against obscured AGN in a flux-selected sample. The fraction of CT AGN relative to $\log [N_{\rm H}/cm^{-2}]=20-24$ AGN is poorly constrainted, formally in the range 2-56% (90% upper limit of 66%). We derived a fraction ($f_{abs}$) of obscured AGN ($\log [N_{\rm H}/cm^{-2}]=22-24$) as a function of $L_{X}$ in agreement with CXBPSM and previous z < 1 X-ray determinations. Furthermore $f_{abs}$ at z=0.1-0.5 and $\log (L_{X}/erg$ $s^{-1})\approx43.6-44.3$ agrees with observational measurements/trends obtained over larger redshift intervals. We report a significant anti-correlation of $R$ with $L_{X}$ (confirmed by our companion paper on stacked spectra) with considerable scatter around the median $R$ values.
  • We present the results and the source catalog of the NuSTAR survey in the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey (UDS) field, bridging the gap in depth and area between NuSTAR's ECDFS and COSMOS surveys. The survey covers a $\sim 0.6$ deg$^2$ area of the field for a total observing time of $\sim$ 1.75 Ms, to a half-area depth of $\sim$ 155 ks corrected for vignetting at $3-24$ keV, and reaching sensitivity limits at half-area in the full ($3-24$ keV), soft ($3-8$ keV) and hard ($8-24$ keV) bands of $2.2 \times 10^{-14}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$, $1.0 \times 10^{-14}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$, and $2.7 \times 10^{-14}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$, respectively. A total of 67 sources are detected in at least one of the three bands, 56 of which have a robust optical redshift with a median of $\langle z\rangle \sim 1.1$. Through a broadband ($0.5-24$ keV) spectral analysis of the whole sample combined with the NuSTAR hardness ratios, we compute the observed Compton-thick (CT; $N_{\rm H} > 10^{24}$ cm$^{-2}$) fraction. Taking into account the uncertainties on each $N_{\rm H}$ measurement, the final number of CT sources is $6.8\pm1.2$. This corresponds to an observed CT fraction of $(11.5\pm2.0)\%$, providing a robust lower limit to the intrinsic fraction of CT AGN and placing constraints on cosmic X-ray background synthesis models.
  • We present a study of the average X-ray spectral properties of the sources detected by the NuSTAR extragalactic survey, comprising observations of the E-CDFS, EGS and COSMOS fields. The sample includes 182 NuSTAR sources (64 detected at 8-24 keV), with 3-24 keV fluxes ranging between $f_{\rm 3-24 keV}\approx10^{-14}$ and $6\times10^{-13}$ erg/cm$^2$/s ($f_{\rm 8-24 keV}\approx3\times10^{-14}-3\times10^{-13}$ erg/cm$^2$/s) and redshifts of $z=0.04-3.21$. We produce composite spectra from the Chandra+NuSTAR data ($E\approx2-40$ keV, rest frame) for all the sources with redshift identifications (95%) and investigate the intrinsic, average spectra of the sources, divided into broad-line (BL) and narrow-line (NL) AGN, and also in different bins of X-ray column density and luminosity. The average power-law photon index for the whole sample is $\Gamma=1.65_{-0.03}^{+0.03}$, flatter than $\Gamma\approx1.8$ typically found for AGN. While the spectral slope of BL and X-ray unabsorbed AGN is consistent with typical values ($\Gamma=1.79_{-0.01}^{+0.01}$), a significant flattening is seen in NL AGN and heavily-absorbed sources ($\Gamma=1.60_{-0.05}^{+0.08}$ and $\Gamma=1.38_{-0.12}^{+0.12}$, respectively), likely due to the effect of absorption and to the contribution from Compton reflection to the high-energy flux (E>10 keV). We find that the typical reflection fraction in our spectra is $R\approx0.5$ (for $\Gamma=1.8$), with a tentative indication of an increase of the reflection strength with column density. While there is no significant evidence for a dependence of the photon index with X-ray luminosity in our sample, we find that $R$ decreases with luminosity, with relatively high levels of reflection ($R\approx1.2$) for $L_{\rm 10-40 keV}<10^{44}$ erg/s and $R\approx0.3$ for $L_{\rm 10-40 keV}>10^{44}$ erg/s AGN, assuming $\Gamma=1.8$.
  • We identify sources with extremely hard X-ray spectra (i.e., with photon indices of Gamma<0.6 in the 13 sq. deg. NuSTAR serendipitous survey, to search for the most highly obscured AGNs detected at >10 keV. Eight extreme NuSTAR sources are identified, and we use the NuSTAR data in combination with lower energy X-ray observations (from Chandra, Swift XRT, and XMM-Newton) to characterize the broad-band (0.5-24 keV) X-ray spectra. We find that all of the extreme sources are highly obscured AGNs, including three robust Compton-thick (CT; N_H > 1.5e24 cm^-2) AGNs at low redshift (z<0.1), and a likely-CT AGN at higher redshift (z=0.16). Most of the extreme sources would not have been identified as highly obscured based on the low energy (<10 keV) X-ray coverage alone. The multiwavelength properties (e.g., optical spectra and X-ray/MIR luminosity ratios) provide further support for the eight sources being significantly obscured. Correcting for absorption, the intrinsic rest-frame 10-40 keV luminosities of the extreme sources cover a broad range, from ~ 5 x 10^42 to 10^45 erg s^-1. The estimated number counts of CT AGNs in the NuSTAR serendipitous survey are in broad agreement with model expectations based on previous X-ray surveys, except for the lowest redshifts (z<0.07) where we measure a high CT fraction of f_CT^obs = 30 (+16 -12) %. For the small sample of CT AGNs, we find a high fraction of galaxy major mergers (50 +/- 33%) compared to control samples of "normal" AGNs.
  • We perform an X-ray spectral analysis of the brightest and cleanest bare AGN known so far, Ark 120, in order to determine the process(es) at work in the vicinity of the SMBH. We present spectral analysis of data from an extensive campaign observing Ark 120 in X-rays with XMM-Newton (4$\times$120 ks, 2014 March 18-24), and NuSTAR (65.5 ks, 2014 March 22). During this very deep X-ray campaign, the source was caught in a high flux state similar to the earlier 2003 XMM-Newton observation, and about twice as bright as the lower-flux observation in 2013. The spectral analysis confirms the "softer when brighter" behaviour of Ark 120. The four XMM-Newton/pn spectra are characterized by the presence of a prominent soft X-ray excess and a significant FeK$\alpha$ complex. The continuum is very similar above about 3 keV, while significant variability is present for the soft X-ray excess. We find that relativistic reflection from a constant-density, flat accretion disk cannot simultaneously produce the soft excess, broad FeK$\alpha$ complex, and hard X-ray excess. Instead, Comptonization reproduces the broadband (0.3-79 keV) continuum well, together with a contribution from a mildly relativistic disk reflection spectrum. During this 2014 observational campaign, the soft X-ray spectrum of Ark 120 below $\sim$0.5 keV was found to be dominated by Comptonization of seed photons from the disk by a warm ($kT_{\rm e}$$\sim$0.5 keV), optically-thick corona ($\tau$$\sim$9). Above this energy, the X-ray spectrum becomes dominated by Comptonization from electrons in a hot optically thin corona, while the broad FeK$\alpha$ line and the mild Compton hump result from reflection off the disk at several tens of gravitational radii.
  • We present X-ray bolometric correction factors, $\kappa_{Bol}$ ($\equiv L_{Bol}/L_X$), for Compton-thick (CT) active galactic nuclei (AGN) with the aim of testing AGN torus models, probing orientation effects, and estimating the bolometric output of the most obscured AGN. We adopt bolometric luminosities, $L_{Bol}$, from literature infrared (IR) torus modeling and compile published intrinsic 2--10 keV X-ray luminosities, $L_{X}$, from X-ray torus modeling of NuSTAR data. Our sample consists of 10 local CT AGN where both of these estimates are available. We test for systematic differences in $\kappa_{Bol}$ values produced when using two widely used IR torus models and two widely used X-ray torus models, finding consistency within the uncertainties. We find that the mean $\kappa_{Bol}$ of our sample in the range $L_{Bol}\approx10^{42}-10^{45}$ erg/s is log$_{10}\kappa_{Bol}=1.44\pm0.12$ with an intrinsic scatter of $\sim0.2$ dex, and that our derived $\kappa_{Bol}$ values are consistent with previously established relationships between $\kappa_{Bol}$ and $L_{Bol}$ and $\kappa_{Bol}$ and Eddington ratio. We investigate if $\kappa_{Bol}$ is dependent on $N_H$ by comparing our results on CT AGN to published results on less-obscured AGN, finding no significant dependence. Since many of our sample are megamaser AGN, known to be viewed edge-on, and furthermore under the assumptions of AGN unification whereby unobscured AGN are viewed face-on, our result implies that the X-ray emitting corona is not strongly anisotropic. Finally, we present $\kappa_{Bol}$ values for CT AGN identified in X-ray surveys as a function of their observed $L_X$, where an estimate of their intrinsic $L_{X}$ is not available, and redshift, useful for estimating the bolometric output of the most obscured AGN across cosmic time.
  • MCG-5-23-16 was targeted in early 2015 with a half mega-seconds observing campaign using NuSTAR. Here we present the spectral analysis of these datasets along with an earlier observation and study the relativistic reflection and the primary coronal source. The data show strong reflection features in the form of both narrow and broad iron lines plus a Compton reflection hump. A cutoff energy is significantly detected in all exposures. The shape of the reflection spectrum does not change in the two years spanned by the observations, suggesting a stable geometry. A strong positive correlation is found between the cutoff energy and both the hard X-ray flux and spectral index. The measurements imply that the coronal plasma is not at the runaway electron-positron pair limit, and instead contains mostly electrons. The observed variability in the coronal properties is driven by a variable optical depth. A constant heating to cooling ratio is measured implying that there is a feedback mechanism in which a significant fraction of the photons cooling the corona are due to reprocessed hard X-rays.
  • NGC 1448 is one of the nearest luminous galaxies ($L_{8-1000\mu m} >$ 10$^{9} L_{\odot}$) to ours ($z$ $=$ 0.00390), and yet the active galactic nucleus (AGN) it hosts was only recently discovered, in 2009. In this paper, we present an analysis of the nuclear source across three wavebands: mid-infrared (MIR) continuum, optical, and X-rays. We observed the source with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), and combined this data with archival Chandra data to perform broadband X-ray spectral fitting ($\approx$0.5-40 keV) of the AGN for the first time. Our X-ray spectral analysis reveals that the AGN is buried under a Compton-thick (CT) column of obscuring gas along our line-of-sight, with a column density of $N_{\rm H}$(los) $\gtrsim$ 2.5 $\times$ 10$^{24}$ cm$^{-2}$. The best-fitting torus models measured an intrinsic 2-10 keV luminosity of $L_{2-10\rm{,int}}$ $=$ (3.5-7.6) $\times$ 10$^{40}$ erg s$^{-1}$, making NGC 1448 one of the lowest luminosity CTAGNs known. In addition to the NuSTAR observation, we also performed optical spectroscopy for the nucleus in this edge-on galaxy using the European Southern Observatory New Technology Telescope. We re-classify the optical nuclear spectrum as a Seyfert on the basis of the Baldwin-Philips-Terlevich diagnostic diagrams, thus identifying the AGN at optical wavelengths for the first time. We also present high spatial resolution MIR observations of NGC 1448 with Gemini/T-ReCS, in which a compact nucleus is clearly detected. The absorption-corrected 2-10 keV luminosity measured from our X-ray spectral analysis agrees with that predicted from the optical [OIII]$\lambda$5007\AA\ emission line and the MIR 12$\mu$m continuum, further supporting the CT nature of the AGN.
  • We present the first full catalog and science results for the NuSTAR serendipitous survey. The catalog incorporates data taken during the first 40 months of NuSTAR operation, which provide ~20Ms of effective exposure time over 331 fields, with an areal coverage of 13 sq deg, and 497 sources detected in total over the 3-24 keV energy range. There are 276 sources with spectroscopic redshifts and classifications, largely resulting from our extensive campaign of ground-based spectroscopic followup. We characterize the overall sample in terms of the X-ray, optical, and infrared source properties. The sample is primarily comprised of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), detected over a large range in redshift from z = 0.002 - 3.4 (median of <z> = 0.56), but also includes 16 spectroscopically confirmed Galactic sources. There is a large range in X-ray flux, from log( f_3-24keV / erg s^-1 cm^-2 ) ~ -14 to -11, and in rest-frame 10-40 keV luminosity, from log( L_10-40keV / erg s^-1 ) ~ 39 to 46, with a median of 44.1. Approximately 79% of the NuSTAR sources have lower energy (<10 keV) X-ray counterparts from XMM-Newton, Chandra, and Swift/XRT. The mid-infrared (MIR) analysis, using WISE all-sky survey data, shows that MIR AGN color selections miss a large fraction of the NuSTAR-selected AGN population, from ~15% at the highest luminosities (Lx > 10^44 erg s^-1) to ~80% at the lowest luminosities (Lx < 10^43 erg s^-1). Our optical spectroscopic analysis finds that the observed fraction of optically obscured AGNs (i.e., the Type 2 fraction) is F_Type2 = 53(+14-15)%, for a well-defined subset of the 8-24 keV selected sample. This is higher, albeit at a low significance level, than the Type 2 fraction measured for redshift- and luminosity-matched AGNs selected by <10 keV X-ray missions.
  • We discuss the broadband X-ray spectrum of GRS 1734-292 obtained from non-simultaneous XMM-Newton and NuSTAR observations, performed in 2009 and 2014, respectively. GRS1734-292 is a Seyfert 1 galaxy, located near the Galactic plane at $z=0.0214$. The NuSTAR spectrum ($3-80$ keV) is dominated by a primary power-law continuum with $\Gamma=1.65 \pm 0.05$ and a high-energy cutoff $E_c=53^{+11}_{-8}$ keV, one of the lowest measured by NuSTAR in a Seyfert galaxy. Comptonization models show a temperature of the coronal plasma of $kT_e=11.9^{+1.2}_{-0.9}$ keV and an optical depth, assuming a slab geometry, $\tau=2.98^{+0.16}_{-0.19}$ or a similar temperature and $\tau=6.7^{+0.3}_{-0.4}$ assuming a spherical geometry. The 2009 XMM-Newton spectrum is well described by a flatter intrinsic continuum ($\Gamma=1.47^{+0.07}_{-0.03}$) and one absorption line due to Fe\textsc{XXV} K$\alpha$ produced by a warm absorber. Both data sets show a modest iron K$\alpha$ emission line at $6.4$ keV and the associated Compton reflection, due to reprocessing from neutral circumnuclear material.
  • Hot, Dust-Obscured Galaxies (Hot DOGs), selected from the WISE all sky infrared survey, host some of the most powerful Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) known, and might represent an important stage in the evolution of galaxies. Most known Hot DOGs are at $z> 1.5$, due in part to a strong bias against identifying them at lower redshift related to the selection criteria. We present a new selection method that identifies 153 Hot DOG candidates at $z\sim 1$, where they are significantly brighter and easier to study. We validate this approach by measuring a redshift $z=1.009$, and an SED similar to higher redshift Hot DOGs for one of these objects, WISE J1036+0449 ($L_{\rm\,Bol}\simeq 8\times 10^{46}\rm\,erg\,s^{-1}$), using data from Keck/LRIS and NIRSPEC, SDSS, and CSO. We find evidence of a broadened component in MgII, which, if due to the gravitational potential of the supermassive black hole, would imply a black hole mass of $M_{\rm\,BH}\simeq 2 \times 10^8 M_{\odot}$, and an Eddington ratio of $\lambda_{\rm\,Edd}\simeq 2.7$. WISE J1036+0449 is the first Hot DOG detected by NuSTAR, and the observations show that the source is heavily obscured, with a column density of $N_{\rm\,H}\simeq(2-15)\times10^{23}\rm\,cm^{-2}$. The source has an intrinsic 2-10 keV luminosity of $\sim 6\times 10^{44}\rm\,erg\,s^{-1}$, a value significantly lower than that expected from the mid-infrared/X-ray correlation. We also find that the other Hot DOGs observed by X-ray facilities show a similar deficiency of X-ray flux. We discuss the origin of the X-ray weakness and the absorption properties of Hot DOGs. Hot DOGs at $z\lesssim1$ could be excellent laboratories to probe the characteristics of the accretion flow and of the X-ray emitting plasma at extreme values of the Eddington ratio.
  • We analyse high-quality NuSTAR observations of the local (z = 0.011) Seyfert 2 active galactic nucleus (AGN) IC 3639, in conjunction with archival Suzaku and Chandra data. This provides the first broadband X-ray spectral analysis of the source, spanning nearly two decades in energy (0.5-30 keV). Previous X-ray observations of the source below 10 keV indicated strong reflection/obscuration on the basis of a pronounced iron fluorescence line at 6.4 keV. The hard X-ray energy coverage of NuSTAR, together with self-consistent toroidal reprocessing models, enables direct broadband constraints on the obscuring column density of the source. We find the source to be heavily Compton-thick (CTK) with an obscuring column in excess of $3.6\times10^{24}$ cm$^{-2}$, unconstrained at the upper end. We further find an intrinsic 2-10 keV luminosity of $\textrm{log}_{10}(L_{\textrm{2-10 keV}} \textrm{[erg s}^{-1}]) = 43.4^{+0.6}_{-1.1}$ to 90% confidence, almost 400 times the observed flux, and consistent with various multi-wavelength diagnostics. Such a high intrinsic to observed flux ratio in addition to an Fe-K$\alpha$ fluorescence line equivalent width exceeding 2 keV is extreme amongst known bona fide CTK AGN, which we suggest are both due to the high level of obscuration present around IC 3639. Our study demonstrates that broadband spectroscopic modelling with NuSTAR enables large corrections for obscuration to be carried out robustly, and emphasises the need for improved modelling of AGN tori showing intense iron fluorescence.
  • We present $\simeq$0$.\!\!^{\prime\prime}4$-resolution extinction-independent distributions of star formation and dust in 11 star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at $z = 1.3-3.0$. These galaxies are selected from sensitive, blank-field surveys of the $2' \times 2'$ Hubble Ultra-Deep Field at $\lambda = 5$ cm and 1.3 mm using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). They have star-formation rates (SFRs), stellar masses, and dust properties representative of massive main-sequence SFGs at $z \sim 2$. Morphological classification performed on spatially-resolved stellar mass maps indicates a mixture of disk and morphologically disturbed systems; half of the sample harbor X-ray active galactic nuclei (AGN), thereby representing a diversity of $z \sim 2$ SFGs undergoing vigorous mass assembly. We find that their intense star formation most frequently occurs at the location of stellar-mass concentration and extends over an area comparable to their stellar-mass distribution, with a median diameter of $4.2 \pm 1.8$ kpc. This provides direct evidence for galaxy-wide star formation in distant, blank-field-selected main-sequence SFGs. The typical galactic-average SFR surface density is 2.5 M$_{\odot}$yr$^{-1}$kpc$^{-2}$, sufficiently high to drive outflows. In X-ray-selected AGN where radio emission is enhanced over the level associated with star formation, the radio excess pinpoints the AGN, which are found to be co-spatial with star formation. The median extinction-independent size of main-sequence SFGs is two times larger than those of bright submillimeter galaxies whose SFRs are $3-8$ times larger, providing a constraint on the characteristic SFR ($\sim300$ M$_{\odot}$yr$^{-1}$) above which a significant population of more compact star-forming galaxies appears to emerge.
  • We present the 3-8 keV and 8-24 keV number counts of active galactic nuclei (AGN) identified in the NuSTAR extragalactic surveys. NuSTAR has now resolved 33-39% of the X-ray background in the 8-24 keV band, directly identifying AGN with obscuring columns up to approximately 1e25 /cm2. In the softer 3-8 keV band the number counts are in general agreement with those measured by XMM-Newton and Chandra over the flux range 5e-15 < S(3 - 8 keV)/(erg/cm2/s) < 1e-12 probed by NuSTAR. In the hard 8-24 keV band NuSTAR probes fluxes over the range 2e-14 < S(8-24 keV)/(erg/cm2/s) < 1e-12, a factor of approximately 100 fainter than previous measurements. The 8-24 keV number counts match predictions from AGN population synthesis models, directly confirming the existence of a population of obscured and/or hard X-ray sources inferred from the shape of the integrated cosmic X-ray background. The measured NuSTAR counts lie significantly above simple extrapolation with a Euclidian slope to low flux of the Swift/BAT 15-55 keV number counts measured at higher fluxes S(15-55 keV) > 1e-11 erg/cm2/s, reflecting the evolution of the AGN population between the Swift/BAT local (z<0.1) sample and NuSTAR's z~1 sample. CXB synthesis models, which account for AGN evolution, lie above the Swift/BAT measurements, suggesting that they do not fully capture the evolution of obscured AGN at low redshifts.
  • Due to their heavily obscured central engines, the growth rate of Compton-thick (CT) active galactic nuclei (AGN) is difficult to measure. A statistically significant correlation between the Eddington ratio, {\lambda}$_{Edd}$, and the X-ray power-law index, {\Gamma}, observed in unobscured AGN offers an estimate of their growth rate from X-ray spectroscopy (albeit with large scatter). However, since X-rays undergo reprocessing by Compton scattering and photoelectric absorption when the line-of-sight to the central engine is heavily obscured, the recovery of the intrinsic {\Gamma} is challenging. Here we study a sample of local, predominantly Compton-thick megamaser AGN, where the black hole mass, and thus Eddington luminosity, are well known. We compile results on X-ray spectral fitting of these sources with sensitive high-energy (E> 10 keV) NuSTAR data, where X-ray torus models which take into account the reprocessing effects have been used to recover the intrinsic {\Gamma} values and X-ray luminosities, L$_X$. With a simple bolometric correction to L$_X$ to calculate {\lambda}$_{Edd}$, we find a statistically significant correlation between {\Gamma} and {\lambda}$_{Edd}$ (p = 0.007). A linear fit to the data yields {\Gamma} = (0.41$\pm$0.18)log$_{10}${\lambda}$_{Edd}$+(2.38$\pm$ 0.20), which is statistically consistent with results for unobscured AGN. This result implies that torus modeling successfully recovers the intrinsic AGN parameters. Since the megamasers have low-mass black holes (M$_{BH}\approx10^6-10^7$ M$_{sol}$) and are highly inclined, our results extend the {\Gamma}-{\lambda}$_{Edd}$ relationship to lower masses and argue against strong orientation effects in the corona, in support of AGN unification. Finally this result supports the use of {\Gamma} as a growth-rate indicator for accreting black holes, even for Compton-thick AGN.
  • Type I X-ray bursts and superbursts from accreting neutron stars illuminate the accretion disk and produce a reflection signal that evolves as the burst fades. Examining the evolution of reflection features in the spectra will give insight into the burst-disk interaction, a potentially powerful probe of accretion disk physics. At present, reflection has been observed during only two bursts of exceptional duration. We investigate the detectability of reflection signatures with four of the latest well-studied X-ray observatory concepts: Hitomi, NICER, Athena, and LOFT. Burst spectra are modeled for different values for the flux, temperature, and the disk ionization parameter, which are representative for most known bursts and sources. The effective area and through-put of a Hitomi-like telescope are insufficient for characterizing burst reflection features. NICER and Athena will detect reflection signatures in Type I bursts with peak fluxes $\ge 10^{-7.5}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$, and also effectively constrain the reflection parameters for bright bursts with fluxes of $10^{-7}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ in exposures of several seconds. Thus, these observatories will provide crucial new insight into the interaction of accretion flows and X-ray bursts. For sources with low line-of-sight absorption, the wide band-pass of these instruments allows for the detection of soft X-ray reflection features, which are sensitive to the disk metallicity and density. The large collecting area that is part of the LOFT design would revolutionize the field by tracing the evolution of the accretion geometry in detail throughout short bursts.
  • We present a new metric that uses the spectral curvature (SC) above 10 keV to identify Compton-thick AGN in low-quality Swift BAT X-ray data. Using NuSTAR, we observe nine high SC-selected AGN. We find that high-sensitivity spectra show the majority are Compton-thick (78% or 7/9) and the remaining two are nearly Compton-thick (NH~5-8x10^23 cm^-2). We find the SC_bat and SC_nustar measurements are consistent, suggesting this technique can be applied to future telescopes. We tested the SC method on well-known Compton-thick AGN and find it is much more effective than broad band ratios (e.g. 100% using SC vs. 20% using 8-24/3-8 keV). Our results suggest that using the >10 keV emission may be the only way to identify this population since only two sources show Compton-thick levels of excess in the OIII to X-ray emission ratio (F_OIII/F_2-10 keV>1) and WISE colors do not identify most of them as AGN. Based on this small sample, we find that a higher fraction of these AGN are in the final merger stage than typical BAT AGN. Additionally, these nine obscured AGN have, on average, four times higher accretion rates than other BAT-detected AGN (Edd ratio=0.068 compared to 0.016). The robustness of SC at identifying Compton-thick AGN implies a higher fraction of nearby AGN may be Compton-thick (~22%) and the sum of black hole growth in Compton-thick AGN (Eddington ratio times population percentage), is nearly as large as mildly obscured and unobscured AGN.
  • PG1247+267 is one of the most luminous known quasars at $z\sim2$ and is a strongly super-Eddington accreting SMBH candidate. We obtained NuSTAR data of this intriguing source in December 2014 with the aim of studying its high-energy emission, leveraging the broad band covered by the new NuSTAR and the archival XMM-Newton data. Several measurements are in agreement with the super-Eddington scenario for PG1247+267: the soft power law ($\Gamma=2.3\pm0.1$); the weak ionized Fe emission line and a hint of the presence of outflowing ionized gas surrounding the SMBH. The presence of an extreme reflection component is instead at odds with the high accretion rate proposed for this quasar. This can be explained with three different scenarios; all of them are in good agreement with the existing data, but imply very different conclusions: i) a variable primary power law observed in a low state, superimposed on a reflection component echoing a past, higher flux state; ii) a power law continuum obscured by an ionized, Compton thick, partial covering absorber; and iii) a relativistic disk reflector in a lamp-post geometry, with low coronal height and high BH spin. The first model is able to explain the high reflection component in terms of variability. The second does not require any reflection to reproduce the hard emission, while a rather low high-energy cutoff of $\sim100$ keV is detected for the first time in such a high redshift source. The third model require a face-on geometry, which may affect the SMBH mass and Eddington ratio measurements. Deeper X-ray broad-band data are required in order to distinguish between these possibilities.
  • Aims. Study the connection between the masing disk and obscuring torus in Seyfert 2 galaxies. Methods. We present a uniform X-ray spectral analysis of the high energy properties of 14 nearby megamaser Active Galactic Nuclei observed by NuSTAR. We use a simple analytical model to localize the maser disk and understand its connection with the torus by combining NuSTAR spectral parameters with available physical quantities from VLBI mapping. Results. Most of the sources analyzed are heavily obscured, showing a column density in excess of $\sim 10^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$. In particular, $79\%$ are Compton-thick ($N_{\rm H} > 1.5 \times 10^{24}$ cm$^{-2}$). Using column densities measured by NuSTAR, with the assumption that the torus is the extension of the maser disk, and further assuming a reasonable density profile, the torus dimensions can be predicted. They are found to be consistent with mid-IR interferometry parsec-scale observations of Circinus and NGC 1068. In this picture, the maser disk is intimately connected to the inner part of the torus. It is probably made of a large number of molecular clouds connecting the torus and the outer part of the accretion disk, giving rise to a thin disk rotating in most cases in Keplerian or sub-Keplerian motion. This toy model explains the established close connection between water megamaser emission and nuclear obscuration as a geometric effect.
  • We present the first direct measurements of the rest-frame 10-40 keV X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) based on a sample of 94 sources at 0.1 < z <3, selected at 8-24 keV energies from sources in the NuSTAR extragalactic survey program. Our results are consistent with the strong evolution of the AGN population seen in prior, lower-energy studies of the XLF. However, different models of the intrinsic distribution of absorption, which are used to correct for selection biases, give significantly different predictions for the total number of sources in our sample, leading to small, systematic differences in our binned estimates of the XLF. Adopting a model with a lower intrinsic fraction of Compton-thick sources and a larger population of sources with column densities N_H ~ 10^{23-24} /cm2 or a model with stronger Compton reflection component (with a relative normalization of R ~ 2 at all luminosities) can bring extrapolations of the XLF from 2-10 keV into agreement with our NuSTAR sample. Ultimately, X-ray spectral analysis of the NuSTAR sources is required to break this degeneracy between the distribution of absorbing column densities and the strength of the Compton reflection component and thus refine our measurements of the XLF. Furthermore, the models that successfully describe the high-redshift population seen by NuSTAR tend to over-predict previous, high-energy measurements of the local XLF, indicating that there is evolution of the AGN population that is not fully captured by the current models.
  • To provide the census of the sources contributing to the X-ray background peak above 10 keV, NuSTAR is performing extragalactic surveys using a three-tier "wedding cake" approach. We present the NuSTAR survey of the COSMOS field, the medium sensitivity and medium area tier, covering 1.7 deg2 and overlapping with both Chandra and XMM-Newton data. This survey consists of 121 observations for a total exposure of ~3 Ms. To fully exploit these data, we developed a new detection strategy, carefully tested through extensive simulations. The survey sensitivity at 20% completeness is 5.9, 2.9 and 6.4 x 10^-14 erg/cm2/s in the 3-24 keV, 3-8 keV and 8-24 keV bands, respectively. By combining detections in 3 bands, we have a sample of 91 NuSTAR sources with 10^42 -10^45.5 erg/s luminosities and redshift z=0.04-2.5. Thirty two sources are detected in the 8-24 keV band with fluxes ~100 times fainter than sources detected by Swift-BAT. Of the 91 detections, all but four are associated with a Chandra and/or XMM-Newton point-like counterpart. One source is associated with an extended lower energy X-ray source. We present the X-ray (hardness ratio and luminosity) and optical-to-X-ray properties. The observed fraction of candidate Compton-thick AGN measured from the hardness ratio is between 13-20%. We discuss the spectral properties of NuSTAR J100259+0220.6 (ID 330) at z=0.044, with the highest hardness ratio in the entire sample. The measured column density exceeds 10^24 /cm2, implying the source is Compton-thick. This source was not previously recognized as such without the >10 keV data.
  • We present initial results and the source catalog from the NuSTAR survey of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (hereafter, ECDFS) - currently the deepest contiguous component of the NuSTAR extragalactic survey program. The survey covers the full ~30 arcmin x 30 arcmin area of this field to a maximum depth of ~360 ks (~220 ks when corrected for vignetting at 3-24 keV), reaching sensitivity limits of ~1.3 x 10^-14 erg/cm2/s (3-8 keV), ~3.4 x 10^-14 erg/cm2/s (8-24 keV) and ~3.0 x 10^-14 erg/cm2/s (3-24 keV). Fifty four (54) sources are detected over the full field, although five of these are found to lie below our significance threshold once contaminating flux from neighboring (i.e., blended) sources is taken into account. Of the remaining 49 that are significant, 19 are detected in the 8-24 keV band. The 8-24 keV to 3-8 keV band ratios of the twelve sources that are detected in both bands span the range 0.39-1.7, corresponding to a photon index range of Gamma ~ 0.5-2.3, with a median photon index of 1.70 +/- 0.52. The redshifts of the 49 sources in our main sample span the range z = 0.21-2.7, and their rest-frame 10-40 keV luminosities (derived from the observed 8-24 keV fluxes) span the range L(10-40 keV) ~ (0.7-300) x 10^43 erg/s, sampling below the "knee" of the X-ray luminosity function out to z ~ 0.8-1. Finally, we identify one NuSTAR source that has neither a Chandra nor an XMM-Newton counterpart, but that shows evidence of nuclear activity at infrared wavelengths, and thus may represent a genuine, new X-ray source detected by NuSTAR in the ECDFS.
  • We present two NuSTAR observations of the local Seyfert 2 active galactic nucleus (AGN) and an ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) candidate in NGC 5643. Together with archival data from Chandra, XMM-Newton and Swift-BAT, we perform a high-quality broadband spectral analysis of the AGN over two decades in energy ($\sim$0.5-100 keV). Previous X-ray observations suggested that the AGN is obscured by a Compton-thick (CT) column of obscuring gas along our line-of-sight. However, the lack of high-quality $\gtrsim$ 10 keV observations, together with the presence of a nearby X-ray luminous source, NGC 5643 X-1, had left significant uncertainties in the characterization of the nuclear spectrum. NuSTAR now enables the AGN and NGC 5643 X-1 to be separately resolved above 10 keV for the first time and allows a direct measurement of the absorbing column density toward the nucleus. The new data show that the nucleus is indeed obscured by a CT column of $N_{\rm{H}}$ $\gtrsim$ 5 $\times$ 10$^{24}$ cm$^{-2}$. The range of 2-10 keV absorption-corrected luminosity inferred from the best fitting models is $L_{2-10,\rm{int}} =$ (0.8-1.7) $\times$ 10$^{42}$ erg s$^{-1}$, consistent with that predicted from multiwavelength intrinsic luminosity indicators. We also study the NuSTAR data for NGC 5643 X-1, and show that it exhibits evidence for a spectral cut-off at energy, $E$ $\sim$ 10 keV, similar to that seen in other ULXs observed by NuSTAR. Along with the evidence for significant X-ray luminosity variations in the 3-8 keV band from 2003-2014, our results further strengthen the ULX classification of NGC 5643 X-1.
  • We present an analysis of the 3-79 keV NuSTAR spectrum of the low-luminosity active galactic nucleus NGC 7213. In agreement with past observations, we find a lower limit to the high-energy cut-off of Ec > 140 keV, no evidence for a Compton-reflected continuum, and the presence of an iron Kalpha complex, possibly produced in the broad-line region. From the application of the MYTorus model, we find that the line-emitting material is consistent with the absence of a significant Compton reflection if arising from a Compton-thin torus of gas with a column density of 5.0(+2.0,-1.6) cm^-2. We report variability of the equivalent width of the iron lines on the time-scale of years using archival observations from XMM-Newton, Chandra and Suzaku. This analysis suggests a possible contribution from dusty gas. A fit with a Comptonization model indicates the presence of a hot corona with a temperature kTe > 40 keV and an optical depth tau < 1, assuming a spherical geometry.