• In an earlier paper we modeled the far-infrared emission from a star-forming galaxy using the photoionisation code CLOUDY and presented metallicity sensitive diagnostics based on far-infrared fine structure line ratios. Here, we focus on the applicability of the [OIII]88/[NII]122 microns line ratio as a gas phase metallicity indicator in high redshift submillimetre luminous galaxies. The [OIII]88/[NII]122 microns ratio is strongly dependent on the ionization parameter (which is related to the total number of ionizing photons) as well as the gas electron density. We demonstrate how the ratio of 88/$122 continuum flux measurements can provide a reasonable estimate of the ionization parameter while the availability of the [NII]205 microns line can constrain the electron density. Using the [OIII]88/[NII]122 microns line ratios from a sample of nearby normal and star-forming galaxies we measure their gas phase metallicities and find that their mass metallicity relation is consistent with the one derived using optical emission lines. Using new, previously unpublished, Herschel spectroscopic observations of key far-infrared fine structure lines of the z~3 galaxy HLSW-01 and additional published measurements of far-infrared fine structure lines of high-z submillimetre luminous galaxies we derive gas phase metallicities using their [OIII]88/[NII]122 microns line ratio. We find that the metallicities of these z~3 submm luminous galaxies are consistent with solar metallicities and that they appear to follow the mass-metallicity relation expected for z~3 systems.
  • We report the identification of an extreme proto-cluster of galaxies in the early Universe whose core (nicknamed Distant Red Core, DRC) is formed by at least ten dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs), confirmed to lie at $z_{\rm spec} = 4.002$ via detection of [CI](1-0), $^{12}$CO(6-5), $^{12}$CO(4-3), $^{12}$CO(2-1) and ${\rm H_2O} (2_{11} - 2_{02})$ emission lines, detected using ALMA and ATCA. The spectroscopically-confirmed components of the proto-cluster are distributed over a ${\rm 260\, kpc \times 310\, kpc}$ region and have a collective obscured star-formation rate (SFR) of $\sim 6500 \, M_\odot \, {\rm yr}^{-1}$, considerably higher than has been seen before in any proto-cluster of galaxies or over-densities of DSFGs at $z \gtrsim 4$. Most of the star formation is taking place in luminous DSFGs since no Ly$\alpha$ emitters are detected in the proto-cluster core, apart from a Ly$\alpha$ blob located next to one of the DRC dusty components and extending over $60\,{\rm kpc}$. The total obscured SFR of the proto-cluster could rise to ${\rm SFR} \sim 14,400 \, M_\odot \, {\rm yr}^{-1}$ if all the members of an over-density of bright DSFGs discovered around DRC in a wide-field LABOCA 870-$\mu$m image are part of the same structure. The total halo mass of DRC could be as high as $\sim 4.4 \times 10^{13}\,M_\odot$ and could be the progenitor of a Coma-like cluster at $z = 0$. The relatively short gas-depletion times of the DRC components suggest either the presence of a mechanism able to trigger extreme star formation simultaneously in galaxies spread over a few hundred kpc or the presence of gas flows from the cosmic web able to sustain star formation over several hundred million years.
  • We present high-spatial-resolution ($\sim 0.12''$ or $\approx 800 \, {\rm pc}$ at $z = 4.5$) ALMA $870\,\mu$m dust continuum observations of a sample of 44 ultrared dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) selected from the H-ATLAS and HerMES far-infrared surveys because of their red colors from 250 to 500 $\mu$m: $S_{500} / S_{250} > 1.5$ and $S_{500} / S_{350} > 1.0$. With photometric redshifts in the range $z \sim 4$-6, our sample includes the most luminous starbursting systems in the early Universe known so far, with total obscured star-formation rates (SFRs) of up to $\sim 4,500 \, M_\odot \, {\rm yr}^{-1}$, as well as a population of lensed, less intrinsically luminous sources. The lower limit on the number of ultrared DSFGs at 870 $\mu$m (with flux densities measured from the ALMA maps and thus not affected by source confusion) derived in this work is in reasonable agreement with models of galaxy evolution, whereas there have been reports of conflicts at 500 $\mu$m (where flux densities are derived from SPIRE). Ultrared DSFGs have a variety of morphologies (from relatively extended disks with smooth radial profiles, to compact sources, both isolated and interacting) and an average size, $\theta_{\rm FWHM}$, of $1.46 \pm 0.41\, {\rm kpc}$, considerably smaller than the values reported in previous work for less-luminous DSFGs at lower redshifts. The size and the estimated gas-depletion times of our sources are compatible with their being the progenitors of the most massive, compact, red-and-dead galaxies at $z \sim 2$-3, and ultimately of local ultra-massive elliptical galaxies or massive galaxy clusters. We are witnessing the birth of the high-mass tail of the red sequence of galaxies.
  • We present 1.3- and/or 3-mm continuum images and 3-mm spectral scans, obtained using NOEMA and ALMA, of 21 distant, dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs). Our sample is a subset of the galaxies selected by Ivison et al. (2016) on the basis of their extremely red far-infrared (far-IR) colours and low {\it Herschel} flux densities; most are thus expected to be unlensed, extraordinarily luminous starbursts at $z \gtrsim 4$, modulo the considerable cross-section to gravitational lensing implied by their redshift. We observed 17 of these galaxies with NOEMA and four with ALMA, scanning through the 3-mm atmospheric window. We have obtained secure redshifts for seven galaxies via detection of multiple CO lines, one of them a lensed system at $z=6.027$ (two others are also found to be lensed); a single emission line was detected in another four galaxies, one of which has been shown elsewhere to lie at $z=4.002$. Where we find no spectroscopic redshifts, the galaxies are generally less luminous by 0.3-0.4 dex, which goes some way to explaining our failure to detect line emission. We show that this sample contains amongst the most luminous known star-forming galaxies. Due to their extreme star-formation activity, these galaxies will consume their molecular gas in $\lesssim 100$ Myr, despite their high molecular gas masses, and are therefore plausible progenitors of the massive, `red-and-dead' elliptical galaxies at $z \approx 3$.
  • We have combined the wide-area Herschel-ATLAS far-IR survey with spectroscopic redshifts from GAMA and SDSS to define a sample of 21 low--redshift ($z_{\rm spec} < 0.5$) analogs of submm galaxies (SMGs). These have been selected because their dust temperatures and total IR luminosities are similar to those for the classical high-redshift SMG population. As well as presenting the sample, in this paper we report $^{12}$CO(2-1) and $^{12}$CO(1-0) observations of 16 low-redshift analogs of SMGs taken with the IRAM-30m telescope. We have obtained that low-redshift analogs of SMGs represent a very diverse population, similar to what has been found for high-redshift SMGs. A large variety in the molecular gas excitation or $^{12}$CO(2-1)/$^{12}$CO(1-0) line ratio is seen, meaning that extrapolations from $J \geq 2$ CO lines can result in very uncertain molecular gas mass determinations. Our sources with $^{12}$CO(1-0) detections follow the dust--gas correlation found in previous work at different redshifts and luminosities. The molecular gas mass of low-redshift SMGs has an average value of $M_{\rm H_2} \sim 1.6 \times 10^{10}\,M_\odot$ and will be consumed in $\sim 100 \, {\rm Myr}$ . We also find a wide range of molecular gas fractions, with the highest values being compatible with those found in high-redshift SMGs with $^{12}$CO(1-0) detections, which are only the most luminous. Low-redshift SMGs offer a unique opportunity to study the properties of extreme star formation in a detail not possible at higher redshifts.
  • We present an extragalactic survey using observations from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) to characterise galaxy populations up to $z=0.35$: the Valpara\'iso ALMA Line Emission Survey (VALES). We use ALMA Band-3 CO(1--0) observations to study the molecular gas content in a sample of 67 dusty normal star-forming galaxies selected from the $Herschel$ Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey ($H$-ATLAS). We have spectrally detected 49 galaxies at $>5\sigma$ significance and 12 others are seen at low significance in stacked spectra. CO luminosities are in the range of $(0.03-1.31)\times10^{10}$ K km s$^{-1}$ pc$^2$, equivalent to $\log({\rm M_{gas}/M_{\odot}}) =8.9-10.9$ assuming an $\alpha_{\rm CO}$=4.6(K km s$^{-1}$ pc$^{2}$)$^{-1}$, which perfectly complements the parameter space previously explored with local and high-z normal galaxies. We compute the optical to CO size ratio for 21 galaxies resolved by ALMA at $\sim 3$."$5$ resolution (6.5 kpc), finding that the molecular gas is on average $\sim$ 0.6 times more compact than the stellar component. We obtain a global Schmidt-Kennicutt relation, given by $\log [\Sigma_{\rm SFR}/({\rm M_{\odot} yr^{-1}kpc^{-2}})]=(1.26 \pm 0.02) \times \log [\Sigma_{\rm M_{H2}}/({\rm M_{\odot}\,pc^{-2}})]-(3.6 \pm 0.2)$. We find a significant fraction of galaxies lying at `intermediate efficiencies' between a long-standing mode of star-formation activity and a starburst, specially at $\rm L_{IR}=10^{11-12} L_{\odot}$. Combining our observations with data taken from the literature, we propose that star formation efficiencies can be parameterised by $\log [{\rm SFR/M_{H2}}]=0.19 \times {\rm (\log {L_{IR}}-11.45)}-8.26-0.41 \times \arctan[-4.84 (\log {\rm L_{IR}}-11.45) ]$. Within the redshift range we explore ($z<0.35$), we identify a rapid increase of the gas content as a function of redshift.
  • We present the final data release of the APEX low-redshift legacy survey for molecular gas (ALLSMOG), comprising CO(2-1) emission line observations of 88 nearby, low-mass (10^8.5<M* [M_Sun]<10^10) star-forming galaxies carried out with the 230 GHz APEX-1 receiver on the APEX telescope. The main goal of ALLSMOG is to probe the molecular gas content of more typical and lower stellar mass galaxies than have been studied by previous CO surveys. We also present IRAM 30m observations of the CO(1-0) and CO(2-1) emission lines in nine galaxies aimed at increasing the M*<10^9 M_Sun sample size. In this paper we describe the observations, data reduction and analysis methods and we present the final CO spectra together with archival HI 21cm line observations for the entire sample of 97 galaxies. At the sensitivity limit of ALLSMOG, we register a total CO detection rate of 47%. Galaxies with higher M*, SFR, nebular extinction (A_V), gas-phase metallicity (O/H), and HI gas mass have systematically higher CO detection rates. In particular, the parameter according to which CO detections and non-detections show the strongest statistical differences is the gas-phase metallicity, for any of the five metallicity calibrations examined in this work. We investigate scaling relations between the CO(1-0) line luminosity and galaxy-averaged properties using ALLSMOG and a sub-sample of COLD GASS for a total of 185 sources that probe the local main sequence (MS) of star-forming galaxies and its +-0.3 dex intrinsic scatter from M* = 10^8.5 M_Sun to M* = 10^11 M_Sun. L'_{CO(1-0)} is most strongly correlated with the SFR, but the correlation with M* is closer to linear and almost comparably tight. The relation between L'_{CO(1-0)} and metallicity is the steepest one, although deeper CO observations of galaxies with A_V<0.5 mag may reveal an as much steep correlation with A_V. [abridged]
  • The identification of high-redshift massive galaxies with old stellar populations may pose challenges to some models of galaxy formation. However, to securely classify a galaxy as quiescent, it is necessary to exclude significant ongoing star formation, something that can be challenging to achieve at high redshift. In this letter, we analyse deep ALMA/870um and SCUBA-2/450um imaging of the claimed "post-starburst" galaxy ZF-20115 at z=3.717 that exhibits a strong Balmer break and absorption lines. The far-infrared imaging reveals a luminous starburst located 0.4+/-0.1 arcsec (~3kpc in projection) from the position of the rest-frame ultra-violet/optical emission, with an obscured star-formation rate of 100 Mo/yr. This star-forming component is undetected in the rest-frame ultraviolet but contributes significantly to the lower angular resolution photometry at restframe wavelengths >3500A, significantly complicating the determination of a reliable stellar mass. Importantly, in the presence of dust obscuration, strong Balmer features are not a unique signature of a post-starburst galaxy and are indeed frequently observed in infrared-luminous galaxies. We conclude that the ZF20015 system does not pose a challenge to current models of galaxy formation and that deep sub-/millimeter observations are a prerequisite for any claims of quiescence. The multi-wavelength observations of ZF20115 unveil a complex system with an intricate and spatially-varying star-formation history. ZF20115 demonstrates that understanding high-redshift obscured starbursts will only be possible with multi-wavelength studies that include high-resolution observations, available with the JWST, at mid-infrared wavelengths.
  • We present ALMA and VLA detections of the dense molecular gas tracers HCN, HCO$^+$ and HNC in two lensed, high-redshift starbursts selected from the {\it Herschel}-ATLAS survey: {\it H}-ATLAS\,J090740.0$-$004200 (SDP.9, $z \sim 1.6$) and {\it H}-ATLAS\,J091043.1$-$000321 (SDP.11, $z \sim 1.8$). ALMA observed the $J = 3-2$ transitions in both sources, while the VLA observed the $J = 1-0$ transitions in SDP.9. We have detected all observed HCN and HCO$^+$ lines in SDP.9 and SDP.11, and also HNC(3--2) in SDP.9. The amplification factors for both galaxies have been determined from sub-arcsec resolution CO and dust emission observations carried out with NOEMA and the SMA. The HNC(1--0)/HCN(1--0) line ratio in SDP.9 suggests the presence of photon-dominated regions, as it happens to most local (U)LIRGs. The CO, HCN and HCO$^+$ SLEDs of SDP.9 are compatible to those found for many local, infrared (IR) bright galaxies, indicating that the molecular gas in local and high-redshift dusty starbursts can have similar excitation conditions. We obtain that the correlation between total IR ($L_{\rm IR}$) and dense line ($L_{\rm dense}$) luminosity in SDP.9 and SDP.11 and local star-forming galaxies can be represented by a single relation. The scatter of the $L_{\rm IR} - L_{\rm dense}$ correlation, together with the lack of sensitive dense molecular gas tracer observations for a homogeneous sample of high-redshift galaxies, prevents us from distinguishing differential trends with redshift. Our results suggest that the intense star formation found in some high-redshift dusty, luminous starbursts is associated with more massive dense molecular gas reservoirs and higher dense molecular gas fractions.
  • We present the detection of four far-infrared fine-structure oxygen lines, as well as strong upper limits for the CO(2-1) and [N II] 205 um lines, in 3C 368, a well-studied radio-loud galaxy at z = 1.131. These new oxygen lines, taken in conjunction with previously observed neon and carbon fine-structure lines, suggest a powerful active galactic nucleus (AGN), accompanied by vigorous and extended star formation. A starburst dominated by O8 stars, with an age of ~6.5 Myr, provides a good fit to the fine-structure line data. This estimated age of the starburst makes it nearly concurrent with the latest episode of AGN activity, suggesting a link between the growth of the supermassive black hole and stellar population in this source. We do not detect the CO(2-1) line, down to a level twelve times lower than the expected value for star forming galaxies. This lack of CO line emission is consistent with recent star formation activity if the star-forming molecular gas has low metallicity, is highly fractionated (such that CO is photodissociated through much of the clouds), or is chemically very young (such that CO has not yet had time to form). It is also possible, though we argue unlikely, that the ensemble of fine structure lines are emitted from the region heated by the AGN.
  • Until recently, only a handful of dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) were known at $z>4$, most of them significantly amplified by gravitational lensing. Here, we have increased the number of such DSFGs substantially, selecting galaxies from the uniquely wide 250-, 350- and 500-$\mu$m Herschel-ATLAS imaging survey on the basis of their extremely red far-infrared colors and faint 350- and 500-$\mu$m flux densities - ergo they are expected to be largely unlensed, luminous, rare and very distant. The addition of ground-based continuum photometry at longer wavelengths from the JCMT and APEX allows us to identify the dust peak in their SEDs, better constraining their redshifts. We select the SED templates best able to determine photometric redshifts using a sample of 69 high-redshift, lensed DSFGs, then perform checks to assess the impact of the CMB on our technique, and to quantify the systematic uncertainty associated with our photometric redshifts, $\sigma=0.14\,(1+z)$, using a sample of 25 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts, each consistent with our color selection. For Herschel-selected ultrared galaxies with typical colors of $S_{500}/S_{250}\sim 2.2$ and $S_{500}/S_{350}\sim 1.3$ and flux densities, $S_{500}\sim 50\,$mJy, we determine a median redshift, $\hat{z}_{\rm phot}=3.66$, an interquartile redshift range, 3.30$-$4.27, with a median rest-frame 8$-$1000-$\mu$m luminosity, $\hat{L}_{\rm IR}$, of $1.3\times 10^{13}\,$L$_\odot$. A third lie at $z>4$, suggesting a space density, $\rho_{z>4}$, of $\approx 6 \times 10^{-7}\,$Mpc$^{-3}$. Our sample contains the most luminous known star-forming galaxies, and the most over-dense cluster of starbursting proto-ellipticals yet found.
  • We present direct estimates of the mean sky brightness temperature in observing bands around 99GHz and 242GHz due to line emission from distant galaxies. These values are calculated from the summed line emission observed in a blind, deep survey for specrtal line emission from high redshift galaxies using ALMA (the 'ASPECS' survey). In the 99 GHz band, the mean brightness will be dominated by rotational transitions of CO from intermediate and high redshift galaxies. In the 242GHz band, the emission could be a combination of higher order CO lines, and possibly [CII] 158$\mu$m line emission from very high redshift galaxies ($z \sim 6$ to 7). The mean line surface brightness is a quantity that is relevant to measurements of spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background, and as a potential tool for studying large-scale structures in the early Universe using intensity mapping. While the cosmic volume and the number of detections are admittedly small, this pilot survey provides a direct measure of the mean line surface brightness, independent of conversion factors, excitation, or other galaxy formation model assumptions. The mean surface brightness in the 99GHZ band is: $T_B = 0.94\pm 0.09$ $\mu$K. In the 242GHz band, the mean brightness is: $T_B = 0.55\pm 0.033$ $\mu$K. These should be interpreted as lower limits on the average sky signal, since we only include lines detected individually in the blind survey, while in a low resolution intensity mapping experiment, there will also be the summed contribution from lower luminosity galaxies that cannot be detected individually in the current blind survey.
  • We investigate the region around the Planck-detected z=3.26 gravitationally lensed galaxy HATLAS J114637.9-001132 (hereinafter HATLAS12-00) using both archival Herschel data from the H-ATLAS survey and using submm data obtained with both LABOCA and SCUBA2. The lensed source is found to be surrounded by a strong overdensity of both Herschel-SPIRE sources and submm sources. We detect 17 bright (S_870 >~7 mJy) sources at >4sigma closer than 5 arcmin to the lensed object at 850/870 microns. Ten of these sources have good cross-identifications with objects detected by Herschel-SPIRE which have redder colours than other sources in the field, with 350 micron flux > 250 micron flux, suggesting that they lie at high redshift. Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations localise one of these companions to ~1 arcsecond, allowing unambiguous cross identification with a 3.6 and 4.5 micron Spitzer source. The optical/near-IR spectral energy distribution (SED) of this source is measured by further observations and found to be consistent with z>2, but incompatible with lower redshifts. We conclude that this system may be a galaxy cluster/protocluster or larger scale structure that contains a number of galaxies undergoing starbursts at the same time.
  • Exploiting the sensitivity and spatial resolution of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), we have studied the morphology and the physical scale of the interstellar medium - both gas and dust - in SGP38326, an unlensed pair of interacting starbursts at $z= 4.425$. SGP38326 is the most luminous star bursting system known at $z > 4$ with an IR-derived ${\rm SFR \sim 4300 \,} M_\odot \, {\rm yr}^{-1}$. SGP38326 also contains a molecular gas reservoir among the most massive ever found in the early Universe, and it is the likely progenitor of a massive, red-and-dead elliptical galaxy at $z \sim 3$. Probing scales of $\sim 0.1"$ or $\sim 800 \, {\rm pc}$ we find that the smooth distribution of the continuum emission from cool dust grains contrasts with the more irregular morphology of the gas, as traced by the [CII] fine structure emission. The gas is also extended over larger physical scales than the dust. The velocity information provided by the resolved [CII] emission reveals that the dynamics of the two components of SGP38326 are compatible with disk-like, ordered rotation, but also reveals an ISM which is turbulent and unstable. Our observations support a scenario where at least a subset of the most distant extreme starbursts are highly dissipative mergers of gas-rich galaxies.
  • We describe the search for Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) near the sub-millimeter bright starburst galaxy HFLS3 at $z$$=$6.34 and a study on the environment of this massive galaxy during the end of reionization.We performed two independent selections of LBGs on images obtained with the \textit{Gran Telescopio Canarias} (GTC) and the \textit{Hubble Space Telescope} (HST) by combining non-detections in bands blueward of the Lyman-break and color selection. A total of 10 objects fulfilling the LBG selection criteria at $z$$>$5.5 were selected over the 4.54 and 55.5 arcmin$^2$ covered by our HST and GTC images, respectively. The photometric redshift, UV luminosity, and the star-formation rate of these sources were estimated with models of their spectral energy distribution. These $z$$\sim$6 candidates have physical properties and number densities in agreement with previous results. The UV luminosity function at $z$$\sim$6 and a Voronoi tessellation analysis of this field shows no strong evidence for an overdensity of relatively bright objects (m$_{F105W}$$<$25.9) associated with \textit{HFLS3}. However, the over-density parameter deduced from this field and the surface density of objects can not excluded definitively the LBG over-density hypothesis. Moreover we identified three faint objects at less than three arcseconds from \textit{HFLS3} with color consistent with those expected for $z$$\sim$6 galaxies. Deeper data are needed to confirm their redshifts and to study their association with \textit{HFLS3} and the galaxy merger that may be responsible for the massive starburst.
  • The Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) has identified large numbers of dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) over a wide range in redshift. A detailed understanding of these DSFGs is hampered by the limited spatial resolution of Herschel. We present 870um 0.45" resolution imaging from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) of 29 HerMES DSFGs with far-infrared (FIR) flux densities in between the brightest of sources found by Herschel and fainter DSFGs found in ground-based sub-millimeter (sub-mm) surveys. We identify 62 sources down to the 5-sigma point-source sensitivity limit in our ALMA sample (sigma~0.2mJy), of which 6 are strongly lensed (showing multiple images) and 36 experience significant amplification (mu>1.1). To characterize the properties of the ALMA sources, we introduce and make use of uvmcmcfit, a publicly available Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis tool for interferometric observations of lensed galaxies. Our lens models tentatively favor intrinsic number counts for DSFGs with a steep fall off above 8mJy at 880um. Nearly 70% of the Herschel sources comprise multiple ALMA counterparts, consistent with previous research indicating that the multiplicity rate is high in bright sub-mm sources. Our ALMA sources are located significantly closer to each other than expected based on results from theoretical models as well as fainter DSFGs identified in the LABOCA ECDFS Submillimeter Survey. The high multiplicity rate and low projected separations argue in favor of interactions and mergers driving the prodigious emission from the brightest DSFGs as well as the sharp downturn above S_880=8mJy.
  • Evolution in the measured rest frame ultraviolet spectral slope and ultraviolet to optical flux ratios indicate a rapid evolution in the dust obscuration of galaxies during the first 3 billion years of cosmic time (z>4). This evolution implies a change in the average interstellar medium properties, but the measurements are systematically uncertain due to untested assumptions, and the inability to measure heavily obscured regions of the galaxies. Previous attempts to directly measure the interstellar medium in normal galaxies at these redshifts have failed for a number of reasons with one notable exception. Here we report measurements of the [CII] gas and dust emission in 9 typical (~1-4L*) star-forming galaxies ~1 billon years after the big bang (z~5-6). We find these galaxies have >12x less thermal emission compared with similar systems ~2 billion years later, and enhanced [CII] emission relative to the far-infrared continuum, confirming a strong evolution in the interstellar medium properties in the early universe. The gas is distributed over scales of 1-8 kpc, and shows diverse dynamics within the sample. These results are consistent with early galaxies having significantly less dust than typical galaxies seen at z<3 and being comparable to local low-metallicity systems.
  • We explore the behaviour of [CII]-157.74um forbidden fine-structure line observed in a sample of 28 galaxies selected from ~50deg^2 of the H-ATLAS survey. The sample is restricted to galaxies with flux densities higher than S_160um>150mJy and optical spectra from the GAMA survey at 0.02<z<0.2. Far-IR spectra centred on this redshifted line were taken with the PACS instrument on-board the Herschel Space Observatory. The galaxies span 10<log(L_IR/Lo)<12 (where L_IR=L_IR[8-1000um]) and 7.3<log(L_[CII]/Lo)<9.3, covering a variety of optical galaxy morphologies. The sample exhibits the so-called [CII] deficit at high IR luminosities, i.e. L_[CII]/L_IR (hereafter [CII]/IR) decreases at high L_IR. We find significant differences between those galaxies presenting [CII]/IR>2.5x10^-3 with respect to those showing lower ratios. In particular, those with high ratios tend to have: (1) L_IR<10^11Lo; (2) cold dust temperatures, T_d<30K; (3) disk-like morphologies in r-band images; (4) a WISE colour 0.5<S_12um/S_22um<1.0; (5) low surface brightness Sigma_IR~10^8-9 Lo kpc^-2, (6) and specific star-formation rates of sSFR~0.05-3 Gyr^-1. We suggest that the strength of the far-UV radiation fields (<G_O>) is main parameter responsible for controlling the [CII]/IR ratio. It is possible that relatively high <G_O> creates a positively charged dust grain distribution, impeding an efficient photo-electric extraction of electrons from these grains to then collisionally excite carbon atoms. Within the brighter IR population, 11<log(L_IR/Lo)<12, the low [CII]/IR ratio is unlikely to be modified by [CII] self absorption or controlled by the presence of a moderately luminous AGN (identified via the BPT diagram).
  • We investigate the CO excitation of normal star forming disk galaxies at z=1.5 using IRAM PdBI observations of the CO[2-1], CO[3-2] and CO[5-4] transitions for 4 galaxies, including VLA observations of CO[1-0] for 3 of them, with the aim of constraining the average state of H2 gas. Exploiting prior knowledge of the velocity range, spatial extent and size of the CO emission we measure reliable line fluxes with S/N>4-7 for individual transitions. While the average CO Spectral Line Energy Distribution (SLED) has a sub-thermal excitation similar to the Milky Way (MW) up to CO[3-2], we show that the average CO[5-4] emission is four times stronger than assuming MW excitation. This demonstrates the presence of an additional component of more excited, denser and possibly warmer molecular gas. The ratio of CO[5-4] to lower-J CO emission is lower than in local (U)LIRGs and high-redshift SMGs, correlating closely with the average intensity of the radiation field <U> and with the star formation surface density, but not with the SF efficiency (SFE). The CO[5-4] luminosity correlates linearly with LIR over 4 orders of magnitudes, with z=1.5 BzK galaxies following the same trend as local spirals and (U)LIRGs and high redshift star bursting SMGs. The CO[5-4] luminosity is thus empirically related to the dense gas, and might be a more convenient way to probe it than standard high--density tracers that are much fainter than CO. We see excitation variations among our sample galaxies, that can be linked to their evolutionary state and clumpiness in optical rest frame images. In one galaxy we see spatially resolved excitation variations, where the more highly excited part of the galaxy corresponds to the location of massive SF clumps. This supports to models that suggest that giant clumps are the main source of the high excitation CO emission in high redshift disk-like galaxies.
  • We present high-resolution observations of the 880 $\mu$m (rest-frame FIR) continuum emission in the z$=$4.05 submillimeter galaxy GN20 from the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI). These data resolve the obscured star formation in this unlensed galaxy on scales of 0.3$^{\prime\prime}$$\times$0.2$^{\prime\prime}$ ($\sim$2.1$\times$1.3 kpc). The observations reveal a bright (16$\pm$1 mJy) dusty starburst centered on the cold molecular gas reservoir and showing a bar-like extension along the major axis. The striking anti-correlation with the HST/WFC3 imaging suggests that the copious dust surrounding the starburst heavily obscures the rest-frame UV/optical emission. A comparison with 1.2 mm PdBI continuum data reveals no evidence for variations in the dust properties across the source within the uncertainties, consistent with extended star formation, and the peak star formation rate surface density (119$\pm$8 M$_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ kpc$^{-2}$) implies that the star formation in GN20 remains sub-Eddington on scales down to 3 kpc$^2$. We find that the star formation efficiency is highest in the central regions of GN20, leading to a resolved star formation law with a power law slope of $\Sigma_{\rm SFR}$ $\sim$ $\Sigma_{\rm H_2}^{\rm 2.1\pm1.0}$, and that GN20 lies above the sequence of normal star-forming disks, implying that the dispersion in the star formation law is not due solely to morphology or choice of conversion factor. These data extend previous evidence for a fixed star formation efficiency per free-fall time to include the star-forming medium on $\sim$kpc-scales in a galaxy 12 Gyr ago.
  • The broad spectral bandwidth at mm and cm-wavelengths provided by the recent upgrades to the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) has made it possible to conduct unbiased searches for molecular CO line emission at redshifts, z > 1.31. We present the discovery of a gas-rich, star-forming galaxy at z = 2.48, through the detection of CO(1-0) line emission in the COLDz survey, through a sensitive, Ka-band (31 to 39 GHz) VLA survey of a 6.5 square arcminute region of the COSMOS field. We argue that the broad line (FWHM ~570 +/- 80 km/s) is most likely to be CO(1-0) at z=2.48, as the integrated emission is spatially coincident with an infrared-detected galaxy with a photometric redshift estimate of z = 3.2 +/- 0.4. The CO(1-0) line luminosity is L'_CO = (2.2 +/- 0.3) x 10^{10} K km/s pc^2, suggesting a cold molecular gas mass of M_gas ~ (2 - 8)x10^{10}M_solar depending on the assumed value of the molecular gas mass to CO luminosity ratio alpha_CO. The estimated infrared luminosity from the (rest-frame) far-infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) is L_IR = 2.5x10^{12} L_solar and the star-formation rate is ~250 M_solar/yr, with the SED shape indicating substantial dust obscuration of the stellar light. The infrared to CO line luminosity ratio is ~114+/-19 L_solar/(K km/s pc^2), similar to galaxies with similar SFRs selected at UV/optical to radio wavelengths. This discovery confirms the potential for molecular emission line surveys as a route to study populations of gas-rich galaxies in the future.
  • We present Keck-Adaptive Optics and Hubble Space Telescope high resolution near-infrared (IR) imaging for 500 um-bright candidate lensing systems identified by the Herschel Multi-tiered Extra-galactic Survey (HerMES) and Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Survey (H-ATLAS). Out of 87 candidates with near-IR imaging, 15 (~17%) display clear near-IR lensing morphologies. We present near-IR lens models to reconstruct and recover basic rest-frame optical morphological properties of the background galaxies from 12 new systems. Sources with the largest near-IR magnification factors also tend to be the most compact, consistent with the size bias predicted from simulations and pre- vious lensing models for sub-millimeter galaxies. For four new sources that also have high-resolution sub-mm maps, we test for differential lensing between the stellar and dust components and find that the 880 um magnification factor (u_880) is ~1.5 times higher than the near-IR magnification factor (u_NIR), on average. We also find that the stellar emission is ~2 times more extended in size than dust. The rest-frame optical properties of our sample of Herschel-selected lensed SMGs are consistent with those of unlensed SMGs, which suggests that the two populations are similar.
  • We present Herschel far-IR photometry and spectroscopy as well as ground based CO observations of an intermediate redshift (0.21 < z < 0.88) sample of Herschel-selected (ultra)-luminous infrared galaxies (L_IR > 10^11.5L_sun). With these measurements we trace the dust continuum, far-IR atomic line emission, in particular [CII]\,157.7microns, as well as the molecular gas of z~0.3 (U)LIRGs and perform a detailed investigation of the interstellar medium of the population. We find that the majority of Herschel-selected intermediate redshift (U)LIRGs have L_CII/L_FIR ratios that are a factor of about 10 higher than that of local ULIRGs and comparable to that of local normal and high-$z$ star forming galaxies. Using our sample to bridge local and high-z [CII] observations, we find that the majority of galaxies at all redshifts and all luminosities follow a L_CII-L_FIR relation with a slope of unity, from which local ULIRGs and high-z AGN dominated sources are clear outliers. We also confirm that the strong anti-correlation between the L_CII/L_FIR ratio and the far-IR color L_60/L_100 observed in the local Universe holds over a broad range of redshifts and luminosities, in the sense that warmer sources exhibit lower L_CII/L_FIR at any epoch. Intermediate redshift ULIRGs are also characterised by large molecular gas reservoirs and by lower star formation efficiencies compared to that of local ULIRGs. The high L_CII/L_FIR ratios, the moderate star formation efficiencies (L_LIR/L_CO or L_IR/M_gas) and the relatively low dust temperatures of our sample (which are also common characteristics of high-z star forming galaxies with ULIRG-like luminosities) indicate that the evolution of the physical properties of (U)LIRGs between the present day and z > 1 is already significant by z ~ 0.3.
  • We present ALLSMOG, the APEX Low-redshift Legacy Survey for MOlecular Gas. ALLSMOG is a survey designed to observe the CO(2-1) emission line with the APEX telescope, in a sample of local galaxies (0.01 < z < 0.03), with stellar masses in the range 8.5 < log(M*/Msun) < 10. This paper is a data release and initial analysis of the first two semesters of observations, consisting of 42 galaxies observed in CO(2-1). By combining these new CO(2-1) emission line data with archival HI data and SDSS optical spectroscopy, we compile a sample of low-mass galaxies with well defined molecular gas masses, atomic gas masses, and gas-phase metallicities. We explore scaling relations of gas fraction and gas consumption timescale, and test the extent to which our findings are dependent on a varying CO/H2 conversion factor. We find an increase in the H2/HI mass ratio with stellar mass which closely matches semi-analytic predictions. We find a mean molecular gas fraction for ALLSMOG galaxies of MH2/M* = (0.09 - 0.13), which decreases with stellar mass. We measure a mean molecular gas consumption timescale for ALLSMOG galaxies of 0.4 - 0.7 Gyr. We also confirm the non-universality of the molecular gas consumption timescale, which varies (with stellar mass) from ~100 Myr to ~2 Gyr. Importantly, we find that the trends in the H2/HI mass ratio, gas fraction, and the non-universal molecular gas consumption timescale are all robust to a range of recent metallicity-dependent CO/H2 conversion factors.
  • We describe a search for submillimeter emission in the vicinity of one of the most distant, luminous galaxies known, HerMES FLS3 at z=6.34, exploiting it as a signpost to a potentially biased region of the early Universe, as might be expected in hierarchical structure formation models. Imaging to the confusion limit with the innovative, wide-field submillimeter bolometer camera, SCUBA-2, we are sensitive to colder and/or less luminous galaxies in the surroundings of HFLS3. We use the Millennium Simulation to illustrate that HFLS3 may be expected to have companions if it is as massive as claimed, but find no significant evidence from the surface density of SCUBA-2 galaxies in its vicinity, or their colors, that HFLS3 marks an over-density of dusty, star-forming galaxies. We cannot rule out the presence of dusty neighbours with confidence, but deeper 450-um imaging has the potential to more tightly constrain the redshifts of nearby galaxies, at least one of which likely lies at z>~5. If associations with HFLS3 can be ruled out, this could be taken as evidence that HFLS3 is less biased than a simple extrapolation of the Millennium Simulation may imply. This could suggest either that it represents a rare short-lived, but highly luminous, phase in the evolution of an otherwise typical galaxy, or that this system has suffered amplification due to a foreground gravitational lens and so is not as intrinsically luminous as claimed.