• Carbon monoxide (CO) provides crucial information about the molecular gas properties of galaxies. While $^{12}$CO has been targeted extensively, isotopologues such as $^{13}$CO have the advantage of being less optically thick and observations have recently become accessible across full galaxy discs. We present a comprehensive new dataset of $^{13}$CO(1-0) observations with the IRAM 30-m telescope of the full discs of 9 nearby spiral galaxies from the EMPIRE survey at a spatial resolution of $\sim$1.5kpc. $^{13}$CO(1-0) is mapped out to $0.7-1r_{25}$ and detected at high signal-to-noise throughout our maps. We analyse the $^{12}$CO(1-0)-to-$^{13}$CO(1-0) ratio ($\Re$) as a function of galactocentric radius and other parameters such as the $^{12}$CO(2-1)-to-$^{12}$CO(1-0) intensity ratio, the 70-to-160$\mu$m flux density ratio, the star-formation rate surface density, the star-formation efficiency, and the CO-to-H$_2$ conversion factor. We find that $\Re$ varies by a factor of 2 at most within and amongst galaxies, with a median value of 11 and larger variations in the galaxy centres than in the discs. We argue that optical depth effects, most likely due to changes in the mixture of diffuse/dense gas, are favored explanations for the observed $\Re$ variations, while abundance changes may also be at play. We calculate a spatially-resolved $^{13}$CO(1-0)-to-H$_2$ conversion factor and find an average value of $1.0\times10^{21}$ cm$^{-2}$ (K.km/s)$^{-1}$ over our sample with a standard deviation of a factor of 2. We find that $^{13}$CO(1-0) does not appear to be a good predictor of the bulk molecular gas mass in normal galaxy discs due to the presence of a large diffuse phase, but it may be a better tracer of the mass than $^{12}$CO(1-0) in the galaxy centres where the fraction of dense gas is larger.
  • We present observations of CO(3-2) and $^{13}$CO(3-2) emission near the supernebula in the dwarf galaxy NGC 5253, which contains one of the best examples of a potential globular cluster in formation. The 0.3" resolution images reveal an unusual molecular cloud, "Cloud D1", coincident with the radio-infrared supernebula. The ~6-pc diameter cloud has a linewidth, $\Delta$ v = 21.7 km/s, that reflects only the gravitational potential of the star cluster residing within it. The corresponding virial mass is 2.5 x 10$^5$ M$_\odot$. The cluster appears to have a top-heavy initial mass function, with $M_{low}$~1-2 M$_\odot$. Cloud D1 is optically thin in CO(3-2) probably because the gas is hot. Molecular gas mass is very uncertain but constitutes < 35% of the dynamical mass within the cloud boundaries. In spite of the presence of an estimated ~1500-2000 O stars within the small cloud, the CO appears relatively undisturbed. We propose that Cloud D1 consists of molecular clumps or cores, possibly star-forming, orbiting with more evolved stars in the core of the giant cluster.
  • We used the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) to map the CO(3-2) and the underlying continuum emissions around the type 1 low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (LLAGN; bolometric luminosity $\lesssim 10^{42}$ erg~s$^{-1}$) of NGC 1097 at $\sim 10$ pc resolution. These observations revealed a detailed cold gas distribution within a $\sim 100$ pc of this LLAGN. In contrast to the luminous Seyfert galaxy NGC 1068, where a $\sim 7$ pc cold molecular torus was recently revealed, a distinctively dense and compact torus is missing in our CO(3-2) integrated intensity map of NGC 1097. Based on the CO(3-2) flux, the gas mass of the torus of NGC 1097 would be a factor of $\gtrsim 2-3$ less than that found for NGC 1068 by using the same CO-to-H$_2$ conversion factor, which implies less active nuclear star formation and/or inflows in NGC 1097. Our dynamical modeling of the CO(3-2) velocity field implies that the cold molecular gas is concentrated in a thin layer as compared to the hot gas traced by the 2.12 $\mu$m H$_2$ emission in and around the torus. Furthermore, we suggest that NGC 1097 hosts a geometrically thinner torus than NGC 1068. Although the physical origin of the torus thickness remains unclear, our observations support a theoretical prediction that geometrically thick tori with high opacity will become deficient as AGNs evolve from luminous Seyferts to LLAGNs.
  • We present Very Large Array observations of the 33 GHz radio continuum emission from 22 local ultraluminous and luminous infrared (IR) galaxies (U/LIRGs). These observations have spatial (angular) resolutions of 30--720 pc (0.07"-0.67") in a part of the spectrum that is likely to be optically thin. This allows us to estimate the size of the energetically dominant regions. We find half-light radii from 30 pc to 1.7 kpc. The 33 GHz flux density correlates well with the IR emission, and we take these sizes as indicative of the size of the region that produces most of the energy. Combining our 33 GHz sizes with unresolved measurements, we estimate the IR luminosity and star formation rate per area, and the molecular gas surface and volume densities. These quantities span a wide range (4 dex) and include some of the highest values measured for any galaxy (e.g., $\mathrm{\Sigma_{SFR}^{33GHz} \leq 10^{4.1} M_{\odot} yr^{-1} kpc^{-2}}$). At least $13$ sources appear Compton thick ($\mathrm{N_{H}^{33GHz} \geq 10^{24} cm^{-2}}$). Consistent with previous work, contrasting these data with observations of normal disk galaxies suggests a nonlinear and likely multi-valued relation between SFR and molecular gas surface density, though this result depends on the adopted CO-to-H$_{2}$ conversion factor and the assumption that our 33 GHz sizes apply to the gas. 11 sources appear to exceed the luminosity surface density predicted for starbursts supported by radiation pressure and supernovae feedback, however we note the need for more detailed observations of the inner disk structure. U/LIRGs with higher surface brightness exhibit stronger [{\sc Cii}] 158$\mu$m deficits, consistent with the suggestion that high energy densities drive this phenomenon.
  • Extragalactic observations of water emission can provide valuable insights into the excitation of the interstellar medium. In addition, extragalactic megamasers are powerful probes of kinematics close to active nuclei. Therefore, it is paramount to determine the true origin of the water emission, whether it is excited by processes close to an AGN or in star-forming regions. We use ALMA Band 5 science verification observations to analyse the emission of the 183 GHz water line in Arp 220 on sub-arcsecond scales, in conjunction with new ALMA Band 7 data at 325 GHz. Specifically, the nature of the process leading to the excitation of emission at these water lines is studied in this context. Supplementary 22 GHz VLA observations are used to better constrain the parameter space in the excitation modelling of the water lines. We detect 183 GHz H2O and 325 GHz water emission towards the two compact nuclei at the center of Arp 220, being brighter in Arp 220 West. The emission at these two frequencies is compared to previous single-dish data and does not show evidence of variability. The 183 and 325 GHz lines show similar spectra and kinematics, but the 22 GHz profile is significantly different in both nuclei due to a blend with an NH3 absorption line. Our findings suggest that the most likely scenario to cause the observed water emission in Arp 220 is a large number of independent masers originating from numerous star-forming regions.
  • High critical density molecular lines like HCN(1-0) or HCO+(1-0) represent our best tool to study currently star-forming, dense molecular gas at extragalactic distances. The optical depth of these lines is a key ingredient to estimate the effective density required to excite emission. However, constraints on this quantity are even scarcer in the literature than measurements of the high density tracers themselves. Here, we combine new observations of HCN, HCO+ and HNC(1-0) and their optically thin isotopologues H13CN, H13CO+ and HN13C(1-0) to measure isotopologue line ratios. We use IRAM 30-m observations from the large program EMPIRE and new ALMA observations, which together target 6 nearby star-forming galaxies. Using spectral stacking techniques, we calculate or place strong upper limits on the HCN/H13CN, HCO+/H13CO+ and HNC/HN13C line ratios in the inner parts of these galaxies. Under simple assumptions, we use these to estimate the optical depths of HCN(1-0) and HCO+(1-0) to be \tau ~2-11 in the active, inner regions of our targets. The critical densities are consequently lowered to values between 5-20$\times 10^5$, 1-3$\times 10^5$ and 9$\times 10^4$ cm-3 for HCN, HCO+ and HNC, respectively. We study the impact of having different beam-filling factors, $\eta$, on these estimates and find that the effective critical densities decrease by a factor of $\frac{\eta_{12}}{\eta_{13}}\,\tau_{12}$. A comparison to existing work in NGC 5194 and NGC 253 shows HCN/H13CN and HCO+/H13CO+ ratios in agreement with our measurements within the uncertainties. The same is true for studies in other environments such as the Galactic Centre or nuclear regions of AGN-dominated nearby galaxies.
  • AGN feedback is invoked as one of the most relevant mechanisms that shape the evolution of galaxies. Our goal is to understand the interplay between AGN feedback and the interstellar medium in M51, a nearby spiral galaxy with a modest AGN and a kpc-scale radio jet expanding through the disc of the galaxy. For that purpose, we combine molecular gas observations in the CO(1-0) and HCN(1-0) lines from the Plateau de Bure interferometer with archival radio, X-ray, and optical data. We show that there is a significant scarcity of CO emission in the ionisation cone, while molecular gas emission tends to accumulate towards the edges of the cone. The distribution and kinematics of CO and HCN line emission reveal AGN feedback effects out to r~500pc, covering the whole extent of the radio jet, with complex kinematics in the molecular gas which displays strong local variations. We propose that this is the result of the almost coplanar jet pushing on molecular gas in different directions as it expands; the effects are more pronounced in HCN than in CO emission, probably as the result of radiative shocks. Following previous interpretation of the redshifted molecular line in the central 5" as caused by a molecular outflow, we estimate the outflow rates to be Mdot_H2~0.9Msun/yr and Mdot_dense~0.6Msun/yr, which are comparable to the molecular inflow rates (~1Msun/yr); gas inflow and AGN feedback could be mutually regulated processes. The agreement with findings in other nearby radio galaxies suggests that this is not an isolated case, and probably the paradigm of AGN feedback through radio jets, at least for galaxies hosting low-luminosity active nuclei.
  • A local dwarf galaxy, NGC 5253, has a young super star cluster that may provide an example of highly efficient star formation. Here we report the detection and imaging, with the Submillimeter Array, of the J= 3-2 rotational transition of CO at the location of the massive cluster associated with the supernebula. The gas cloud is hot, dense, quiescent, and extremely dusty. Its gas-to-dust ratio is lower than the Galactic value, which we attribute to dust enrichment by Wolf-Rayet stars within the embedded star cluster. Its star formation efficiency exceeds 50%, ten times higher than clouds in the Milky Way: this cloud is a factory of stars and soot. We suggest that high efficiency results from the force-feeding of star formation by a streamer of gas falling into the galaxy.
  • The nearby Sy 1 galaxy NGC 1097 represents an ideal laboratory to explore the molecular chemistry in the presence and surroundings of an active galactic nucleus. Exploring the distribution of different molecular species allows us to understand the physical processes affecting the ISM both in the AGN vicinity as well as in the outer star forming molecular ring. We carried out 3 mm ALMA observations of HCN, HCO+, CCH, CS, HNCO, SiO, HC3N, and SO as well as the 13C isotopologues. All species were imaged over the central 2 kpc (~30") of the galaxy at a resolution of ~2.2"x1.5 (150 pc x 100 pc). HCO+ and CS appear to be slightly enhanced in the star forming ring. CCH, showing the largest variations across NGC 1097, is suggested to be a good tracer of both obscured and early stage star formation. HNCO, SiO and HC3N are significantly enhanced in the inner circumnuclear disk surrounding the AGN. Differences in the molecular abundances are observed between the star forming ring and the inner circumnuclear disk. We conclude that the HCN/HCO+ and HCN/CS differences observed between AGN dominated and starburst galaxies are not due to a HCN enhancement due to X-rays, but rather this enhancement is produced by shocked material at distances of 200 pc from the AGN. Additionally we claim the lower HCN/CS to be a combination of a small under-abundance of CS in AGNs together with excitation effects, where a high dense gas component (~10^6 cm^-3) may be more prominent in SB galaxies. However the most promising are the differences found among the dense gas tracers which, at our modest spatial resolution, seem to outline the physical structure of the molecular disk around the AGN. In this picture, HNCO probes the well shielded gas in the disk, surrounding the dense material moderately exposed to X-ray radiation traced by HC3N. Finally SiO might be the innermost molecule in the disk structure.