• We use high quality K2 light curves for hundreds of stars in the Pleiades to understand better the angular momentum evolution and magnetic dynamos of young, low mass stars. The K2 light curves provide not only rotational periods but also detailed information from the shape of the phased light curve not available in previous studies. A slowly rotating sequence begins at $(V-K_{\rm s})_0\sim$1.1 (spectral type F5) and ends at $(V-K_{\rm s})_0\sim$ 3.7 (spectral type K8), with periods rising from $\sim$2 to $\sim$11 days in that interval. Fifty-two percent of the Pleiades members in that color interval have periods within 30\% of a curve defining the slow sequence; the slowly rotating fraction decreases significantly redward of $(V-K_{\rm s})_0$=2.6. Nearly all of the slow-sequence stars show light curves that evolve significantly on timescales less than the K2 campaign duration. The majority of the FGK Pleiades members identified as photometric binaries are relatively rapidly rotating, perhaps because binarity inhibits star-disk angular momentum loss mechanisms during pre-main sequence evolution. The fully convective, late M dwarf Pleiades members (5.0 $<(V-K_{\rm s})_0<$ 6.0) nearly always show stable light curves, with little spot evolution or evidence of differential rotation. During PMS evolution from $\sim$3 Myr (NGC2264 age) to $\sim$125 Myr (Pleiades age), stars of 0.3 $M_{\odot}$ shed about half their angular momentum, with the fractional change in period between 3 and 125 Myr being nearly independent of mass for fully convective stars. Our data also suggest that very low mass binaries form with rotation periods more similar to each other and faster than would be true if drawn at random from the parent population of single stars.
  • Young (125 Myr), populous ($>$1000 members), and relatively nearby, the Pleiades has provided an anchor for stellar angular momentum models for both younger and older stars. We used K2 to explore the distribution of rotation periods in the Pleiades. With more than 500 new periods for Pleiades members, we are vastly expanding the number of Pleiads with periods, particularly at the low mass end. About 92\% of the members in our sample have at least one measured spot-modulated rotation period. For the $\sim$8\% of the members without periods, non-astrophysical effects often dominate (saturation, etc.), such that periodic signals might have been detectable, all other things being equal. We now have an unusually complete view of the rotation distribution in the Pleiades. The relationship between $P$ and $(V-K_{\rm s})_0$ follows the overall trends found in other Pleiades studies. There is a slowly rotating sequence for $1.1\lesssim(V-K_{\rm s})_0\lesssim 3.7$, and a primarily rapidly rotating population for $(V-K_{\rm s})_0\gtrsim 5.0$. There is a region in which there seems to be a disorganized relationship between $P$ and $(V-K_{\rm s})_0$ for $3.7 \lesssim(V-K_{\rm s})_0\lesssim 5.0$. Paper II continues the discussion, focusing on multi-period structures, and Paper III speculates about the origin and evolution of the period distribution in the Pleiades.
  • The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) was installed in the Hubble Space Telescope in May, 2009 as part of Servicing Mission 4 to provide high sensitivity, medium and low resolution spectroscopy at far- and near-ultraviolet wavelengths (FUV, NUV). COS is the most sensitive FUV/NUV spectrograph flown to date, spanning the wavelength range from 900{\AA} to 3200{\AA} with peak effective area approaching 3000 cm^2. This paper describes instrument design, the results of the Servicing Mission Orbital Verification (SMOV), and the ongoing performance monitoring program.
  • We will utilize the sensitivity of SIRTF through the Legacy Science Program to carry out spectrophotometric observations of solar-type stars aimed at (1) defining the timescales over which terrestrial and gas giant planets are built, from measurements diagnostic of dust/gas masses and radial distributions; and (2) establishing the diversity of planetary architectures and the frequency of planetesimal collisions as a function of time through observations of circumstellar debris disks. Together, these observations will provide an astronomical context for understanding whether our solar system - and its habitable planet - is a common or a rare circumstance. Achieving our science goals requires measuring precise spectral energy distributions for a statistically robust sample capable of revealing evolutionary trends and the diversity of system outcomes. Our targets have been selected from two carefully assembled databases of solar-like stars: (1) a sample located within 50 pc of the Sun spanning an age range from 100-3000 Myr for which a rich set of ancillary measurements (e.g. metallicity, stellar activity, kinematics) are available; and (2) a selection located between 15 and 180 pc and spanning ages from 3 to 100 Myr. For stars at these distances SIRTF is capable of detecting stellar photospheres with SNR >30 at lambda < 24 microns for our entire sample, as well as achieving SNR >5 at the photospheric limit for over 50% of our sample at lambda=70 microns. Thus we will provide a complete census of stars with excess emission down to the level produced by the dust in our present-day solar system. More information concerning our program can be found at: http://gould.as.arizona.edu/feps