• The WISE satellite surveyed the entire sky multiple times in four infrared (IR) wavelengths ($3.4,\ 4.6,\ 12,$ and $22\, \mu$m, Wright et al. 2010). This all-sky IR photometric survey makes it possible to leverage many of the large publicly available spectroscopic redshift surveys to measure galaxy properties in the IR. While characterizing the cross-matching of WISE data to a single survey is a straightforward process, doing it with six different redshift surveys takes a fair amount of space to characterize adequately, because each survey has unique caveats and characteristics that need addressing. This work describes a data set that results from matching five public redshift surveys with the AllWISE data release, along with a reanalysis of the data described in Lake et al. 2012. The combined data set has an additional flux limit of $80\,\mu$Jy ($19.14$ AB mag) in WISE's W1 filter imposed in order to limit it to targets with high completeness and reliable photometry in the AllWISE data set. Consistent analysis of all of the data is only possible if the color bias discussed in Ilbert et al. (2004) is addressed (for example: the techniques explored in the first paper in this series Lake et al. 2017b). The sample defined herein is used in this paper's sequel paper, Lake et al. 2017a), to measure the luminosity function of galaxies at $2.4\, \mu$m rest frame wavelength, and the selection process of the sample is optimized for this purpose.
  • The WISE satellite surveyed the entire sky multiple times in four infrared wavelengths (3.4, 4.6, 12, and $22\,\mu$m; Wright et al. 2010). The unprecedented combination of coverage area and depth gives us the opportunity to measure the luminosity function of galaxies, one of the fundamental quantities in the study of them, at $2.4\ \mu$m to an unparalleled level of formal statistical accuracy in the near infrared. The big advantage of measuring luminosity functions at wavelengths in the window $\approx 2$ to $3.5\,\mu$m is that it correlates more closely to the total stellar mass in galaxies than others. In this paper we report on the parameters for the $2.4\,\mu$m luminosity function of galaxies obtained from applying the spectroluminosity functional based methods defined in Lake et al. (2017b) to the data sets described in Lake et al. (2017a) using the mean and covariance of $2.4\,\mu$m normalized SEDs from Lake & Wright (2016). In terms of single Schechter function parameters evaluated at the present epoch, the combined result is: $\phi_\star = 5.8 \pm [0.3_{\mathrm{stat}},\, 0.3_{\mathrm{sys}}] \times 10^{-3} \operatorname{Mpc}^{-3}$, $L_\star = 6.4 \pm [0.1_{\mathrm{stat}},\, 0.3_{\mathrm{sys}}] \times 10^{10}\, L_{2.4\,\mu\mathrm{m}\,\odot}$ ($M_\star = -21.67 \pm [0.02_{\mathrm{stat}},\, 0.05_{\mathrm{sys}}]\operatorname{AB\ mag}$), and $\alpha = -1.050 \pm [0.004_{\mathrm{stat}},\, 0.03_{\mathrm{sys}}]$, corresponding to a galaxy number density of $0.08\operatorname{Mpc}^{-3}$ brighter than $10^6\, L_{2.4\,\mu\mathrm{m}\,\odot}$ ($10^{-3} \operatorname{Mpc}^{-3}$ brighter than $L_\star$) and a $2.4\,\mu$m luminosity density equivalent to $3.8\times10^{8}\,L_{2.4\,\mu\mathrm{m}\,\odot}\operatorname{Mpc}^{-3}$. $\ldots$
  • We present a 45 ks Chandra observation of the quasar ULAS J1342+0928 at z=7.54. We detect 14.0^{+4.8}_{-3.7} counts from the quasar in the observed-frame energy range 0.5-7.0 keV (6-sigma detection), representing the most distant non-transient astronomical source identified in X-rays to date. The present data are sufficient only to infer rough constraints on the spectral parameters. We find an X-ray hardness ratio of HR = -0.51^{+0.26}_{-0.28} between the 0.5-2.0 keV and 2.0-7.0 keV ranges and derive a power-law photon index of Gamma = 1.95^{+0.55}_{-0.53}. Assuming a typical value for high-redshift quasars of Gamma = 1.9, ULAS J1342+0928 has a 2-10 keV rest-frame X-ray luminosity of L_{2-10} = 11.6^{+4.3}_{-3.5} x 10^{44} erg/s. Its X-ray-to-optical power-law slope is alpha_{OX}=-1.67^{+0.16}_{-0.10}, consistent with the general trend indicating that the X-ray emission in the most bolometrically powerful quasars is weaker relative to their optical emission.
  • We present broadband X-ray analyses of a sample of bright ultraluminous X-ray sources with the goal of investigating the spectral similarity of this population to the known ULX pulsars, M82 X-2, NGC7793 P13 and NGC5907 ULX. We perform a phase-resolved analysis of the broadband XMM-Newton+NuSTAR dataset of NGC5907 ULX, finding that the pulsed emission from the accretion column in this source exhibits a similar spectral shape to that seen in both M82 X-2 and NGC7793 P13, and that this is responsible for the excess emission observed at the highest energies when the spectra are fit with accretion disk models. We then demonstrate that similar 'hard' excesses are seen in all the ULXs in the broadband sample. Finally, for the ULXs where the nature of the accretor is currently unknown, we test whether the hard excesses are all consistent with being produced by an accretion column similar to those present in M82 X-2, NGC7793 P13 and NGC5907 ULX. Based on the average shape of the pulsed emission, we find that in all cases a similar accretion column can successfully reproduce the observed data, consistent with the hypothesis that this ULX sample may be dominated by neutron star accretors. Compared to the known pulsar ULXs, our spectral fits for the remaining ULXs suggest that the non-pulsed emission from the accretion flow beyond the magnetosphere makes a stronger relative contribution than the component associated with the accretion column. If these sources do also contain neutron star accretors, this may help to explain the lack of detected pulsations.
  • Dorn-Wallenstein, Levesque, & Ruan recently presented the identification of a z=0.215 active galaxy located behind M31 and claimed the detection of multiple periodic variations in the object's light curve with as many as nine different periods. They interpreted these results as evidence for the presence of a binary supermassive black hole with an orbital separation of just a few hundred AU, and estimated the gravitational-wave signal implied by such a system. We demonstrate that the claimed periodicities are based on a misinterpretation of the null hypothesis test simulations and an error in the method used to calculate the false alarm probabilities. There is no evidence for periodicity in the data.
  • The basic unified model of active galactic nuclei (AGN) invokes an anisotropic obscuring structure, usually referred to as a torus, to explain AGN obscuration as an angle-dependent effect. We present a new grid of X-ray spectral templates based on radiative transfer calculations in neutral gas in an approximately toroidal geometry, appropriate for CCD-resolution X-ray spectra (FWHM > 130 eV). Fitting the templates to broadband X-ray spectra of AGN provides constraints on two important geometrical parameters of the gas distribution around the supermassive black hole: the average column density and the covering factor. Compared to the currently available spectral templates, our model is more flexible, and capable of providing constraints on the main torus parameters in a wider range of AGN. We demonstrate the application of this model using hard X-ray spectra from NuSTAR (3-79 keV) for four AGN covering a variety of classifications: 3C 390.3, NGC 2110, IC 5063, and NGC 7582. This small set of examples was chosen to illustrate the range of possible torus configurations, from disk-like to sphere-like geometries with column densities below, as well as above, the Compton-thick threshold. This diversity of torus properties challenges the simple assumption of a standard geometrically and optically thick toroidal structure commonly invoked in the basic form of the unified model of AGN. Finding broad consistency between the our constraints and those from infrared modeling, we discuss how the approach from the X-ray band complements similar measurements of AGN structures at other wavelengths.
  • We discuss the spectral analysis of a sample of 63 Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) detected above a limiting flux of $S(8-24$ keV$)=7\times10^{-14}$ erg/s/cm$^2$ in the multi-tiered NuSTAR Extragalactic Survey program. The sources span a redshift range z=0-2.1 (median $\langle$z$\rangle=$0.58). The spectral analysis is performed over the broad 0.5-24 keV energy range, combining NuSTAR with Chandra and/or XMM-Newton data and employing empirical and physically motivated models. This constitutes the largest sample of AGN selected at $ >10$ keV to be homogeneously spectrally analyzed at these flux levels. We study the distribution of spectral parameters such as photon index, column density ($N_{\rm H}$), reflection parameter ($R$) and 10-40 keV luminosity ($L_{X}$). Heavily obscured ($\log [N_{\rm H}/cm^{-2}]\ge23$) and Compton Thick (CT; $\log [N_{\rm H}/cm^{-2}]\ge24$) AGN constitute $\sim$25% (15-17 sources) and $\sim$2-3% ( 1-2 sources) of the sample, respectively. The observed $N_{\rm H}$ distribution fairly agrees with predictions of Cosmic X-ray Background population synthesis models (CXBPSM). We estimate the intrinsic fraction of AGN as a function of $N_{H}$, accounting for the bias against obscured AGN in a flux-selected sample. The fraction of CT AGN relative to $\log [N_{\rm H}/cm^{-2}]=20-24$ AGN is poorly constrainted, formally in the range 2-56% (90% upper limit of 66%). We derived a fraction ($f_{abs}$) of obscured AGN ($\log [N_{\rm H}/cm^{-2}]=22-24$) as a function of $L_{X}$ in agreement with CXBPSM and previous z < 1 X-ray determinations. Furthermore $f_{abs}$ at z=0.1-0.5 and $\log (L_{X}/erg$ $s^{-1})\approx43.6-44.3$ agrees with observational measurements/trends obtained over larger redshift intervals. We report a significant anti-correlation of $R$ with $L_{X}$ (confirmed by our companion paper on stacked spectra) with considerable scatter around the median $R$ values.
  • We present the results and the source catalog of the NuSTAR survey in the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey (UDS) field, bridging the gap in depth and area between NuSTAR's ECDFS and COSMOS surveys. The survey covers a $\sim 0.6$ deg$^2$ area of the field for a total observing time of $\sim$ 1.75 Ms, to a half-area depth of $\sim$ 155 ks corrected for vignetting at $3-24$ keV, and reaching sensitivity limits at half-area in the full ($3-24$ keV), soft ($3-8$ keV) and hard ($8-24$ keV) bands of $2.2 \times 10^{-14}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$, $1.0 \times 10^{-14}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$, and $2.7 \times 10^{-14}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$, respectively. A total of 67 sources are detected in at least one of the three bands, 56 of which have a robust optical redshift with a median of $\langle z\rangle \sim 1.1$. Through a broadband ($0.5-24$ keV) spectral analysis of the whole sample combined with the NuSTAR hardness ratios, we compute the observed Compton-thick (CT; $N_{\rm H} > 10^{24}$ cm$^{-2}$) fraction. Taking into account the uncertainties on each $N_{\rm H}$ measurement, the final number of CT sources is $6.8\pm1.2$. This corresponds to an observed CT fraction of $(11.5\pm2.0)\%$, providing a robust lower limit to the intrinsic fraction of CT AGN and placing constraints on cosmic X-ray background synthesis models.
  • We present two large catalogs of AGN candidates identified across ~75% of the sky from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer's AllWISE Data Release. Both catalogs, some of the largest such catalogs published to date, are selected purely on the basis of mid-IR photometry in the WISE W1 and W2 bands. The catalogs are designed to be appropriate for a broad range of scientific investigations, with one catalog emphasizing reliability while the other emphasizes completeness. Specifically, the R90 catalog consists of 4,543,530 AGN candidates with 90% reliability, while the C75 catalog consists of 20,907,127 AGN candidates with 75% completeness. We provide a detailed discussion of potential artifacts, and excise portions of the sky close to the Galactic Center, Galactic Plane, nearby galaxies, and other expected contaminating sources. Our final catalogs cover 30,093 deg^2 of extragalactic sky. These catalogs are expected to enable a broad range of science, and we present a few simple illustrative cases. From the R90 sample we identify 45 highly variable AGN lacking radio counterparts in the FIRST survey, implying they are unlikely to be blazars. One of these sources, WISEA J142846.71+172353.1, is a mid-IR-identified changing-look quasar at z=0.104. We characterize our catalogs by comparing them to large, wide-area AGN catalogs in the literature, specifically UV-to-near-IR quasar selections from SDSS and XDQSOz, mid-IR selection from Secrest et al. (2015) and X-ray selection from ROSAT. From the latter work, we identify four ROSAT X-ray sources that each are matched to three WISE-selected AGN in the R90 sample within 30". Palomar spectroscopy reveals one of these systems, 2RXS J150158.6+691029, to consist of a triplet of quasars at z=1.133 +/- 0.004, suggestive of a rich group or forming galaxy cluster.(Abridged)
  • We present Gemini and Keck spectroscopic redshifts and velocity dispersions for twenty clusters detected via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect by the Planck space mission, with estimated masses in the range $2.3 \times 10^{14} M_{\odot} < M < 9.4 \times 10^{14} M_{\odot}$. Cluster members were selected for spectroscopic follow-up with Palomar, Gemini and Keck optical and (in some cases) infrared imaging. Seven cluster redshifts were measured for the first time with this observing campaign, including one of the most distant Planck clusters confirmed to date, at $z=0.782\pm0.010$, PSZ2 G085.95+25.23. The spectroscopic redshift catalogs of members of each confirmed cluster are included as on-line tables. We show the galaxy redshift distributions and measure the cluster velocity dispersions. The cluster velocity dispersions obtained in this paper were used in a companion paper to measure the Planck mass bias and to constrain the cluster velocity bias.
  • We analyze the evolution of the dual AGN in ESO 509-IG066, a galaxy pair located at z=0.034 whose nuclei are separated by 11 kpc. Previous observations with XMM-Newton on this dual AGN found evidence for two moderately obscured ($N_H\sim10^{22}$ cm$^{-2}$) X-ray luminous ($L_X\sim10^{43}$ erg/s) nuclear sources. We present an analysis of subsequent Chandra, NuSTAR and Swift/XRT observations that show one source has dropped in flux by a factor of 10 between 2004 and 2011, which could be explained by either an increase in the absorbing column or an intrinsic fading of the central engine possibly due to a decrease in mass accretion. Both of these scenarios are predicted by galaxy merger simulations. The source which has dropped in flux is not detected by NuSTAR, which argues against absorption, unless it is extreme. However, new Keck/LRIS optical spectroscopy reveals a previously unreported broad H-alpha line which is highly unlikely to be visible under the extreme absorption scenario. We therefore conclude that the black hole in this nucleus has undergone a dramatic drop in accretion rate. From AO-assisted near-infrared integral-field spectroscopy of the other nucleus, we find evidence that the galaxy merger is having a direct effect on the kinematics of the gas close to the nucleus of the galaxy, providing a direct observational link between the galaxy merger and the mass accretion rate on to the black hole.
  • We present a study of the average X-ray spectral properties of the sources detected by the NuSTAR extragalactic survey, comprising observations of the E-CDFS, EGS and COSMOS fields. The sample includes 182 NuSTAR sources (64 detected at 8-24 keV), with 3-24 keV fluxes ranging between $f_{\rm 3-24 keV}\approx10^{-14}$ and $6\times10^{-13}$ erg/cm$^2$/s ($f_{\rm 8-24 keV}\approx3\times10^{-14}-3\times10^{-13}$ erg/cm$^2$/s) and redshifts of $z=0.04-3.21$. We produce composite spectra from the Chandra+NuSTAR data ($E\approx2-40$ keV, rest frame) for all the sources with redshift identifications (95%) and investigate the intrinsic, average spectra of the sources, divided into broad-line (BL) and narrow-line (NL) AGN, and also in different bins of X-ray column density and luminosity. The average power-law photon index for the whole sample is $\Gamma=1.65_{-0.03}^{+0.03}$, flatter than $\Gamma\approx1.8$ typically found for AGN. While the spectral slope of BL and X-ray unabsorbed AGN is consistent with typical values ($\Gamma=1.79_{-0.01}^{+0.01}$), a significant flattening is seen in NL AGN and heavily-absorbed sources ($\Gamma=1.60_{-0.05}^{+0.08}$ and $\Gamma=1.38_{-0.12}^{+0.12}$, respectively), likely due to the effect of absorption and to the contribution from Compton reflection to the high-energy flux (E>10 keV). We find that the typical reflection fraction in our spectra is $R\approx0.5$ (for $\Gamma=1.8$), with a tentative indication of an increase of the reflection strength with column density. While there is no significant evidence for a dependence of the photon index with X-ray luminosity in our sample, we find that $R$ decreases with luminosity, with relatively high levels of reflection ($R\approx1.2$) for $L_{\rm 10-40 keV}<10^{44}$ erg/s and $R\approx0.3$ for $L_{\rm 10-40 keV}>10^{44}$ erg/s AGN, assuming $\Gamma=1.8$.
  • Quasars are galaxies hosting accreting supermassive black holes; due to their brightness, they are unique probes of the early universe. To date, only few quasars have been reported at $z > 6.5$ ($<$800 Myr after the Big Bang). In this work, we present six additional $z \gtrsim 6.5$ quasars discovered using the Pan-STARRS1 survey. We use a sample of 15 $z \gtrsim 6.5$ quasars to perform a homogeneous and comprehensive analysis of this highest-redshift quasar population. We report four main results: (1) the majority of $z\gtrsim$6.5 quasars show large blueshifts of the broad CIV 1549\AA$\,$emission line compared to the systemic redshift of the quasars, with a median value $\sim$3$\times$ higher than a quasar sample at $z\sim$1; (2) we estimate the quasars' black hole masses (M$\rm_{BH}\sim$0.3$-$5 $\times$ 10$^{9}$ M$_{\odot}$) via modeling of the MgII 2798\AA$\,$emission line and rest-frame UV continuum; we find that quasars at high redshift accrete their material (with $\langle (L_{\mathrm{bol}}/L_{\mathrm{Edd}}) \rangle = 0.39$) at a rate comparable to a luminosity-matched sample at lower$-$redshift, albeit with significant scatter ($0.4$ dex); (3) we recover no evolution of the FeII/MgII abundance ratio with cosmic time; (4) we derive near zone sizes; together with measurements for $z\sim6$ quasars from recent work, we confirm a shallow evolution of the decreasing quasar near zone sizes with redshift. Finally, we present new millimeter observations of the [CII] 158 $\mu$m emission line and underlying dust continuum from NOEMA for four quasars, and provide new accurate redshifts and [CII]/infrared luminosities estimates. The analysis presented here shows the large range of properties of the most distant quasars.
  • AX J1745.6-2901 is a high-inclination (eclipsing) transient neutron star (NS) Low Mass X-ray Binary (LMXB) showcasing intense ionised Fe K absorption. We present here the analysis of 11 XMM-Newton and 15 NuSTAR new data-sets (obtained between 2013-2016), therefore tripling the number of observations of AX J1745.6-2901 in outburst. Thanks to simultaneous XMM-Newton and NuSTAR spectra, we greatly improve on the fitting of the X-ray continuum. During the soft state the emission can be described by a disk black body ($kT\sim1.1-1.2$ keV and inner disc radius $r_{DBB}\sim14$ km), plus hot ($kT\sim2.2-3.0$ keV) black body radiation with a small emitting radius ($r_{BB}\sim0.5-0.8$ km) likely associated with the boundary layer or NS surface, plus a faint Comptonisation component. Imprinted on the spectra are clear absorption features created by both neutral and ionised matter. Additionally, positive residuals suggestive of an emission Fe K$\alpha$ disc line and consistent with relativistic ionised reflection are present during the soft state, while such residuals are not significant during the hard state. The hard state spectra are characterised by a hard ($\Gamma\sim1.9-2.1$) power law, showing no evidence for a high energy cut off ($kT_e>60-140$ keV) and implying a small optical depth ($\tau<1.6$). The new observations confirm the previously witnessed trend of exhibiting strong Fe K absorption in the soft state, that significantly weakens during the hard state. Optical (GROND) and radio (GMRT) observations suggest for AX J1745.6-2901 a standard broad band SED as typically observed in accreting neutron stars.
  • We identify sources with extremely hard X-ray spectra (i.e., with photon indices of Gamma<0.6 in the 13 sq. deg. NuSTAR serendipitous survey, to search for the most highly obscured AGNs detected at >10 keV. Eight extreme NuSTAR sources are identified, and we use the NuSTAR data in combination with lower energy X-ray observations (from Chandra, Swift XRT, and XMM-Newton) to characterize the broad-band (0.5-24 keV) X-ray spectra. We find that all of the extreme sources are highly obscured AGNs, including three robust Compton-thick (CT; N_H > 1.5e24 cm^-2) AGNs at low redshift (z<0.1), and a likely-CT AGN at higher redshift (z=0.16). Most of the extreme sources would not have been identified as highly obscured based on the low energy (<10 keV) X-ray coverage alone. The multiwavelength properties (e.g., optical spectra and X-ray/MIR luminosity ratios) provide further support for the eight sources being significantly obscured. Correcting for absorption, the intrinsic rest-frame 10-40 keV luminosities of the extreme sources cover a broad range, from ~ 5 x 10^42 to 10^45 erg s^-1. The estimated number counts of CT AGNs in the NuSTAR serendipitous survey are in broad agreement with model expectations based on previous X-ray surveys, except for the lowest redshifts (z<0.07) where we measure a high CT fraction of f_CT^obs = 30 (+16 -12) %. For the small sample of CT AGNs, we find a high fraction of galaxy major mergers (50 +/- 33%) compared to control samples of "normal" AGNs.
  • We perform an X-ray spectral analysis of the brightest and cleanest bare AGN known so far, Ark 120, in order to determine the process(es) at work in the vicinity of the SMBH. We present spectral analysis of data from an extensive campaign observing Ark 120 in X-rays with XMM-Newton (4$\times$120 ks, 2014 March 18-24), and NuSTAR (65.5 ks, 2014 March 22). During this very deep X-ray campaign, the source was caught in a high flux state similar to the earlier 2003 XMM-Newton observation, and about twice as bright as the lower-flux observation in 2013. The spectral analysis confirms the "softer when brighter" behaviour of Ark 120. The four XMM-Newton/pn spectra are characterized by the presence of a prominent soft X-ray excess and a significant FeK$\alpha$ complex. The continuum is very similar above about 3 keV, while significant variability is present for the soft X-ray excess. We find that relativistic reflection from a constant-density, flat accretion disk cannot simultaneously produce the soft excess, broad FeK$\alpha$ complex, and hard X-ray excess. Instead, Comptonization reproduces the broadband (0.3-79 keV) continuum well, together with a contribution from a mildly relativistic disk reflection spectrum. During this 2014 observational campaign, the soft X-ray spectrum of Ark 120 below $\sim$0.5 keV was found to be dominated by Comptonization of seed photons from the disk by a warm ($kT_{\rm e}$$\sim$0.5 keV), optically-thick corona ($\tau$$\sim$9). Above this energy, the X-ray spectrum becomes dominated by Comptonization from electrons in a hot optically thin corona, while the broad FeK$\alpha$ line and the mild Compton hump result from reflection off the disk at several tens of gravitational radii.
  • We present $NuSTAR$ X-ray observations of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) in NGC 7674. The source shows a flat X-ray spectrum, suggesting that it is obscured by Compton-thick gas columns. Based upon long-term flux dimming, previous work suggested the alternate possibility that the source is a recently switched-off AGN with the observed X-rays being the lagged echo from the torus. Our high-quality data show the source to be reflection-dominated in hard X-rays, but with a relatively weak neutral Fe K$\alpha$ emission line (equivalent width [EW] of $\approx$ 0.4 keV) and a strong Fe XXVI ionised line (EW $\approx$ 0.2 keV). We construct an updated long-term X-ray light curve of NGC 7674 and find that the observed 2-10 keV flux has remained constant for the past $\approx$ 20 years, following a high flux state probed by $Ginga$. Light travel time arguments constrain the minimum radius of the reflector to be $\sim$ 3.2 pc under the switched-off AGN scenario, $\approx$ 30 times larger than the expected dust sublimation radius, rendering this possibility unlikely. A patchy Compton-thick AGN (CTAGN) solution is plausible, requiring a minimum line-of-sight column density ($N_{\rm H}$) of 3 $\times$ 10$^{24}$ cm$^{-2}$ at present, and yields an intrinsic 2-10 keV luminosity of (3-5) $\times$ 10$^{43}$ erg s$^{-1}$. Realistic uncertainties span the range of $\approx$ (1-13) $\times$ 10$^{43}$ erg s$^{-1}$. The source has one of the weakest fluorescence lines amongst {\em bona fide} CTAGN, and is potentially a local analogue of bolometrically luminous systems showing complex neutral and ionised Fe emission. It exemplifies the difficulty of identification and proper characterisation of distant CTAGN based on the strength of the neutral Fe K$\alpha$ line.
  • We present results from a coordinated $XMM$-$Newton$+$NuSTAR$ observation of the type 1.8 Seyfert galaxy IRAS 13197-1627. This is a highly complex source, with strong contributions from relativistic reflection from the inner accretion disk, neutral absorption and further reprocessing by more distant material, and ionised absorption from an outflow. We undertake a detailed spectral analysis combining the broadband coverage provided by $XMM$-$Newton$+$NuSTAR$ with a multi-epoch approach incorporating archival observations performed by $XMM$-$Newton$ and $Suzaku$. Our focus is on characterising the reflection from the inner accretion disk, which previous works have suggested may dominate the AGN emission, and constraining the black hole spin. Using lamppost disk reflection models, we find that the results for the inner disk are largely insensitive to assumptions regarding the geometry of the distant reprocessor and the precise form of the illuminating X-ray continuum. However, these results do depend on the treatment of the iron abundance of the distant absorber/reprocessor. The multi-epoch data favour a scenario in which the AGN is chemically homogeneous, and we find that a rapidly rotating black hole is preferred, with $a^* \geq 0.7$, but a slowly-rotating black hole is not strongly excluded. In addition to the results for the inner disk, we also find that both the neutral and ionised absorbers vary from epoch to epoch, implying that both have some degree of inhomogeneity in their structure.
  • We present X-ray bolometric correction factors, $\kappa_{Bol}$ ($\equiv L_{Bol}/L_X$), for Compton-thick (CT) active galactic nuclei (AGN) with the aim of testing AGN torus models, probing orientation effects, and estimating the bolometric output of the most obscured AGN. We adopt bolometric luminosities, $L_{Bol}$, from literature infrared (IR) torus modeling and compile published intrinsic 2--10 keV X-ray luminosities, $L_{X}$, from X-ray torus modeling of NuSTAR data. Our sample consists of 10 local CT AGN where both of these estimates are available. We test for systematic differences in $\kappa_{Bol}$ values produced when using two widely used IR torus models and two widely used X-ray torus models, finding consistency within the uncertainties. We find that the mean $\kappa_{Bol}$ of our sample in the range $L_{Bol}\approx10^{42}-10^{45}$ erg/s is log$_{10}\kappa_{Bol}=1.44\pm0.12$ with an intrinsic scatter of $\sim0.2$ dex, and that our derived $\kappa_{Bol}$ values are consistent with previously established relationships between $\kappa_{Bol}$ and $L_{Bol}$ and $\kappa_{Bol}$ and Eddington ratio. We investigate if $\kappa_{Bol}$ is dependent on $N_H$ by comparing our results on CT AGN to published results on less-obscured AGN, finding no significant dependence. Since many of our sample are megamaser AGN, known to be viewed edge-on, and furthermore under the assumptions of AGN unification whereby unobscured AGN are viewed face-on, our result implies that the X-ray emitting corona is not strongly anisotropic. Finally, we present $\kappa_{Bol}$ values for CT AGN identified in X-ray surveys as a function of their observed $L_X$, where an estimate of their intrinsic $L_{X}$ is not available, and redshift, useful for estimating the bolometric output of the most obscured AGN across cosmic time.
  • We present a detailed, broadband X-ray spectral analysis of the ULX pulsar NGC 7793 P13, a known super-Eddington source, utilizing data from the $XMM$-$Newton$, $NuSTAR$ and $Chandra$ observatories. The broadband $XMM$-$Newton+NuSTAR$ spectrum of P13 is qualitatively similar to the rest of the ULX sample with broadband coverage, suggesting that additional ULXs in the known population may host neutron star accretors. Through time-averaged, phase-resolved and multi-epoch studies, we find that two non-pulsed thermal blackbody components with temperatures $\sim$0.5 and $\sim$1.5 keV are required to fit the data below 10 keV, in addition to a third continuum component which extends to higher energies and is associated with the pulsed emission from the accretion column. The characteristic radii of the thermal components appear to be similar, and are too large to be associated with the neutron star itself, so the need for two components likely indicates the accretion flow outside the magnetosphere is complex. We suggest a scenario in which the thick inner disc expected for super-Eddington accretion begins to form, but is terminated by the neutron star's magnetic field soon after its onset, implying a magnetic field of $B \lesssim 6 \times 10^{12}$ G for the central neutron star. Evidence of similar termination of the disc in other sources may offer a further means of identifying additional neutron star ULXs. Finally, we examine the spectrum exhibited by P13 during one of its unusual 'off' states. These data require both a hard powerlaw component, suggesting residual accretion onto the neutron star, and emission from a thermal plasma, which we argue is likely associated with the P13 system.
  • The most powerful sources among the blazar family are MeV blazars. Often detected at $z>2$, they usually display high X- and \gm-ray luminosities, larger-than-average jet powers and black hole masses $\gtrsim 10^9 M_{\odot}$. In the present work we perform a multiwavelength study of three high redshift blazars: 3FGL J0325.5+2223 ($z=2.06$), 3FGL J0449.0+1121 ($z= 2.15$), and 3FGL J0453.2$-$2808 ($z=2.56$), analysing quasi simultaneous data from GROND, \swift-UVOT and XRT, \nustar, and \fermi-LAT. Our main focus is on the hard X-ray band recently unveiled by \nustar~(3$-$79 keV) where these objects show a hard spectrum which enables us to constrain the inverse Compton peak and the jet power. We found that all three targets resemble the most powerful blazars, with the synchrotron peak located in the sub-millimeter range and the inverse Compton peak in the MeV range, and therefore belong to the MeV blazar class. Using a simple one zone leptonic emission model to reproduce the spectral energy distributions, we conclude that a simple combination of synchrotron and accretion disk emission reproduces the infrared-optical spectra while the X-ray to \gm-ray part is well reproduced by the inverse Compton scattering of low energy photons supplied by the broad line region. The black hole masses for each of the three sources are calculated to be $\gtrsim 4 \times 10^{8} M_{\odot}$. The three studied sources have jet power at the level of, or beyond, the accretion luminosity.
  • Mergers of galaxies are thought to cause significant gas inflows to the inner parsecs, which can activate rapid accretion onto supermassive black holes (SMBHs), giving rise to Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). During a significant fraction of this process, SMBHs are predicted to be enshrouded by gas and dust. Studying 52 galactic nuclei in infrared-selected local Luminous and Ultra-luminous infrared galaxies in different merger stages in the hard X-ray band, where radiation is less affected by absorption, we find that the amount of material around SMBHs increases during the last phases of the merger. We find that the fraction of Compton-thick (CT, $N_{\rm\,H}\geq 10^{24}\rm\,cm^{-2}$) AGN in late merger galaxies is higher ($f_{\rm\,CT}=65^{+12}_{-13}\%$) than in local hard X-ray selected AGN ($f_{\rm\,CT}=27\pm 4\%$), and that obscuration reaches its maximum when the nuclei of the two merging galaxies are at a projected distance of $D_{12}\simeq0.4-10.8$ kiloparsecs ($f_{\rm\,CT}=77_{-17}^{+13}\%$). We also find that all AGN of our sample in late merger galaxies have $N_{\rm\,H}> 10^{23}\rm\,cm^{-2}$, which implies that the obscuring material covers $95^{+4}_{-8}\%$ of the X-ray source. These observations show that the material is most effectively funnelled from the galactic scale to the inner tens of parsecs during the late stages of galaxy mergers, and that the close environment of SMBHs in advanced mergers is richer in gas and dust with respect to that of SMBHs in isolated galaxies, and cannot be explained by the classical AGN unification model in which the torus is responsible for the obscuration.
  • We present results from four new broadband X-ray observations of the extreme ultraluminous X-ray source Holmberg IX X-1 ($L_{\rm{X}} > 10^{40}$ erg/s), performed by $Suzaku$ and $NuSTAR$ in coordination. Combined with the archival data, we now have broadband observations of this remarkable source from six separate epochs. Two of these new observations probe lower fluxes than seen previously, allowing us to extend our knowledge of the broadband spectral variability exhibited. The spectra are well fit by two thermal blackbody components, which dominate the emission below 10 keV, as well as a steep ($\Gamma \sim 3.5$) powerlaw tail which dominates above $\sim$15 keV. Remarkably, while the 0.3-10.0 keV flux varies by a factor of $\sim$3 between all these epochs, the 15-40 keV flux varies by only $\sim$20%. Although the spectral variability is strongest in the $\sim$1-10 keV band, both of the thermal components are required to vary when all epochs are considered. We also re-visit the search for iron absorption features, leveraging the high-energy $NuSTAR$ data to improve our sensitivity to extreme velocity outflows in light of the ultra-fast outflow recently detected in NGC 1313 X-1. Iron absorption from a similar outflow along our line of sight can be ruled out in this case. We discuss these results in the context of super-Eddington accretion models that invoke a funnel-like geometry for the inner flow, and propose a scenario in which we have an almost face-on view of a funnel that expands to larger radii with increasing flux, resulting in an increasing degree of geometrical collimation for the emission from intermediate temperature regions.
  • We present first results from a series of $NuSTAR$ observations of the black hole X-ray binary V404 Cyg obtained during its summer 2015 outburst, primarily focusing on observations during the height of this outburst activity. The $NuSTAR$ data show extreme variability in both the flux and spectral properties of the source. This is partly driven by strong and variable line-of-sight absorption, similar to previous outbursts. The latter stages of this observation are dominated by strong flares, reaching luminosities close to Eddington. During these flares, the central source appears to be relatively unobscured and the data show clear evidence for a strong contribution from relativistic reflection, providing a means to probe the geometry of the innermost accretion flow. Based on the flare properties, analogy with other Galactic black hole binaries, and also the simultaneous onset of radio activity, we argue that this intense X-ray flaring is related to transient jet activity during which the ejected plasma is the primary source of illumination for the accretion disk. If this is the case, then our reflection modelling implies that these jets are launched in close proximity to the black hole (as close as a few gravitational radii), consistent with expectations for jet launching models that tap either the spin of the central black hole, or the very innermost accretion disk. Our analysis also allows us to place the first constraints on the black hole spin for this source, which we find to be $a^* > 0.92$ (99% statistical uncertainty, based on an idealized lamppost geometry).
  • We present a sample of 10 low-mass active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected from the 40-month NuSTAR serendipitous survey. The sample is selected to have robust NuSTAR detections at $3 - 24$~keV, to be at $z < 0.3$, and to have optical r-band magnitudes at least 0.5~mag fainter than an $L_\star$ galaxy at its redshift. The median values of absolute magnitude, stellar mass and 2--10 X-ray luminosity of our sample are $\langle M_r\rangle = -20.03$, $\langle M_\star\rangle = 4.6\times10^{9}M_\odot$, and $\langle L_{2-10\mathrm{keV}}\rangle = 3.1\times10^{42}$ erg s$^{-1}$, respectively. Five objects have detectable broad H$\alpha$ emission in their optical spectra, indicating black-hole masses of $(1.1-10.4)\times 10^6 M_\odot$. We find that $30^{+17}_{-10}\%$ of the galaxies in our sample do not show AGN-like optical narrow emission lines, and one of the ten galaxies in our sample, J115851+4243.2, shows evidence for heavy X-ray absorption. This result implies that a non-negligible fraction of low-mass galaxies might harbor accreting massive black holes that are missed by optical spectroscopic surveys and $<10$ keV X-ray surveys. The mid-IR colors of our sample also indicate these optically normal low-mass AGNs cannot be efficiently identified with typical AGN selection criteria based on WISE colors. While the hard ($>10$ keV) X-ray selected low-mass AGN sample size is still limited, our results show that sensitive NuSTAR observations are capable of probing faint hard X-ray emission originating from the nuclei of low-mass galaxies out to moderate redshift ($z<0.3$), thus providing a critical step in understanding AGN demographics in low-mass galaxies.