• Hot-Jupiters are subject to extreme radiation and plasma flows coming from their host stars. Past ultraviolet Hubble Space Telescope observations, supported by hydrodynamic models, confirmed that these factors lead to the formation of an extended envelope, part of which lies beyond the Roche lobe. We use gas-dynamic simulations to study the impact of time variations in the parameters of the stellar wind, namely that of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), on the envelope of the typical hot-Jupiter HD 209458b. We consider three CMEs characterized by different velocities and densities, taking their parameters from typical CMEs observed for the Sun. The perturbations in the ram-pressure of the stellar wind during the passage of each CME tear off most of the envelope that is located beyond the Roche lobe. This leads to a substantial increase of the mass-loss rates during the interaction with the CME. We find that the mass lost by the planet during the whole crossing of a CME is of ${\approx}10^{15}$ g, regardless of the CME taken into consideration. We also find that over the course of 1 Gyr, the mass lost by the planet because of CME impacts is comparable to that lost because of high-energy stellar irradiation.
  • Accretion disks in binary systems can experience hydrodynamic impact at inner as well as outer edges. The first case is typical for protoplanetary disks around young T Tau stars. The second one is typical for circumstellar disks in close binaries. As a result of such an impact, perturbations with different scales and amplitudes are excited in the disk. We investigated the nonlinear evolution of perturbations of a finite, but small amplitude, at the background of sub-Keplerian flow. Nonlinear effects at the front of perturbations lead to the formation of a shock wave, namely the discontinuity of the density and radial velocity. At this, the tangential flow in the neighborhood of the shock becomes equivalent to the flow in in the boundary layer. Instability of the tangential flow further leads to turbulization of the disk. Characteristics of the turbulence depend on perturbation parameters, but alpha-parameter of Shakura-Sunyaev does not exceed ~0.1.
  • The results of three-dimensional numerical simulations of the gas dynamics of the atmosphere of a "hot Jupiter" exoplanet during the passage of a coronal mass ejection (CME) from the central star are presented. These computations assumed the parameters for the stellar wind and the CME to be typical of the solar values. The characteristic variations of the flow pattern are considered for quasi-closed and closed (but appreciably distorted by the gravitational influence of the star) gaseous envelopes of the exoplanet. It is shown that a typical CME is sufficient to tear off the outer part of an asymmetric envelope that is located beyond the Roche lobe and carry it away from the exoplanet. This leads to a substantial increase in the mass-loss rate from the exoplanet envelope during the passage of CMEs. The mass-loss rate grows by about a factor of 11 for a closed envelope, and by about a factor of 14 for a quasi-closed envelope. Possible evolutionary consequences of the loss of part of the atmosphere during the passage of CMEs are discussed.
  • According to the computations results obtained by Bisikalo et al. (2013b) for the gas-dynamical effect of stellar winds on exoplanet atmospheres, three types of gaseous envelopes can form around hot Jupiters: closed, quasi-closed, and open. The type of envelope that forms depends on the position of the frontal collision point (where the dynamical pressure of the wind is equal to the pressure of the surrounding atmosphere) relative to the Roche-lobe boundaries. Closed envelopes are formed around planets whose atmospheres lie completely within their Roche lobes. If the frontal collision point is located outside the Roche lobe, the atmospheric material begins to flow out through the Lagrangian points $\mathrm{L_1}$ and $\mathrm{L_2}$, which can result in the formation of quasi-closed (if the dynamical pressure of the stellar wind stops the outflow through $\mathrm{L_1}$) or open gaseous envelopes. The example of the typical hot Jupiter HD 209458 b is considered for four sets of atmospheric parameters, to determine the mass-loss rates for the different types of envelopes arising with these parameters. The mass-loss rates based on the modeling results were estimated to be $\dot{M} \leq 10^{9}$ g/s for a closed atmosphere, $\dot{M} \simeq 3 \times 10^{9}$ g/s for a quasi-closed atmosphere, and $\dot{M} \simeq 3 \times 10^{10}$ g/s for an open atmosphere. The matter in the closed and quasi-closed atmospheres flows out mainly through $\mathrm{L_2}$, and the matter in open envelopes primarily through $\mathrm{L_1}$.
  • We present a method that can be used to recover the spectrum of turbulence from observations of optically thin emission lines formed in astrophysical disks. Within this method we analyze how line intensity fluctuations depend on the angular resolution of the instrument, used for the observations. The method allows us to restore the slope of the power spectrum of velocity turbulent pulsations and estimate the upper boundary of the turbulence scale.
  • Exoplanet science is now in its full expansion, particularly after the CoRoT and Kepler space missions that led us to the discovery of thousands of extra-solar planets. The last decade has taught us that UV observations play a major role in advancing our understanding of planets and of their host stars, but the necessary UV observations can be carried out only by HST, and this is going to be the case for many years to come. It is therefore crucial to build a treasury data archive of UV exoplanet observations formed by a dozen "golden systems" for which observations will be available from the UV to the infrared. Only in this way we will be able to fully exploit JWST observations for exoplanet science, one of the key JWST science case.
  • This paper describes outstanding issues in astrophysics and cosmology that can be solved by astronomical observations in a broad spectral range from far infrared to millimeter wavelengths. The discussed problems related to the formation of stars and planets, galaxies and the interstellar medium, studies of black holes and the development of the cosmological model can be addressed by the planned space observatory Millimetron (the "Spectr-M" project) equipped with a cooled 10-m mirror. Millimetron can operate both as a single-dish telescope and as a part of a space-ground interferometer with very long baseline.
  • The arising of turbulence in gas-dynamic (non-magnetic) accretion disks is a major issue of modern astrophysics. Such accretion disks should be stable against the turbulence generation, in contradiction to observations. Searching for possible instabilities leading to the turbulization of gas-dynamic disks is one of the challenging astrophysical problems. In 2004, we showed that in accretion disks in binary stars the so-called precessional density wave forms and induces additional density and velocity gradients in the disk. Linear analysis of the fluid instability of an accretion disk in a binary system revealed that the presence of the precessional wave in the disk due to tidal interaction with the binary companion gives rise to instability of radial modes with the characteristic growth time of tenths and hundredths of the binary orbital period. The radial velocity gradient in the precessional wave is shown to be responsible for the instability. A perturbation becomes unstable if the velocity variation the perturbation wavelength scale is about or higher than the sound speed. Unstable perturbations arise in the inner part of the disk and, by propagating towards its outer edge, lead to the disk turbulence with parameters corresponding to observations (the Shakura-Sunyaev parameter $\alpha \lesssim 0.01$).
  • We have performed numerical simulations of the interaction between "hot Jupiter" planet and gas of the stellar wind using numerical code developed for investigations of binary stars. With this code we have modeled the structure of the gaseous flow in the system HD 209458. The results have been used to explain observations of this system performed with the COS instrument on-board the HST.
  • We performed 3D MHD calculations of stream accretion in cataclysmic variable stars for which the white dwarf primary star possesses a strong and complex magnetic field. These calculations are motivated by observations of polars; cataclysmic variables containing white dwarfs with magnetic fields sufficiently strong to prevent the formation of an accretion disk. So an accretion stream flows from the L1 point and impacts directly onto one or more spots on the surface of the white dwarf. Observations indicate that the white dwarf, in some binaries, possesses a complex (non-dipolar) magnetic field. We perform simulations of 10 polars or equivalently one asynchronous polar at 10 different beat phases. Our models have an aligned dipole plus quadrupole magnetic field centered on the white dwarf primary. We find that for a sufficiently strong quadrupole component an accretion spot occurs near the magnetic equator for slightly less than half of our simulations while a polar accretion zone is active for most of the rest of the simulations. For one or two configurations; accretion at the dominant polar region and at an equatorial zone occurs simultaneously. These are the first 3D MHD calculations to confirm the existence of complex magnetic fields in magnetic CVs. We conclude, that it might be difficult observationally determine if the field is a pure dipole or if it is complex for polars, but there will be indications for some systems. Specifically, a complex magnetic field should be considered if the there is an accretion zone near the white dwarf's spin equator (orbital plane) or if there are two or more accretion regions that cannot be fit by a dipole magnetic field. For asynchronous polars, magnetic field constraints are expected to be substantially stronger, with clearer indicators of complex field geometry due to changes in accretion flow structure as a function of spin-orbit beat phase.
  • The results of 3D modelling of the flow structure in the classical symbiotic system Z~Andromedae are presented. Outbursts in systems of this type occur when the accretion rate exceeds the upper limit of the steady burning range. Therefore, in order to realize the transition from a quiescent to an active state it is necessary to find a mechanism able to sufficiently increase the accretion rate on a time scale typical to the duration of outburst development. Our calculations have confirmed the transition mechanism from quiescence to outburst in classic symbiotic systems suggested earlier on the basis of 2D calculations (Bisikalo et al, 2002). The analysis of our results have shown that for wind velocity of 20 km/s an accretion disc forms in the system. The accretion rate for the solution with the disc is ~22.5-25% of the mass loss rate of the donor, that is, ~4.5-5*10^(-8)Msun/yr for Z And. This value is in agreement with the steady burning range for white dwarf masses typically accepted for this system. When the wind velocity increases from 20 to 30 km/s the accretion disc is destroyed and the matter of the disc falls onto the accretor's surface. This process is followed by an approximately twofold accretion rate jump. The resulting accretion rate growth is sufficient for passing the upper limit of the steady burning range, thereby bringing the system into an active state. The time during which the accretion rate is above the steady burning value is in a very good agreement with observations. The analysis of the results presented here allows us to conclude that small variations in the donor's wind velocity can lead to the transition from the disc accretion to the wind accretion and, as a consequence, to the transition from quiescent to active state in classic symbiotic stars.
  • The results of 3D hydrodynamic simulation of mass transfer in semidetached binaries of different types (cataclysmic variables and low-mass X-ray binaries) are presented. We find that taking into account of a circumbinary envelope leads to significant changes in the stream-disc morphology. In particular, the obtained steady-state self-consistent solutions show an absence of impact between gas stream from the inner Lagrangian point L1 and forming accretion disc. The stream deviates under the action of gas of circumbinary envelope, and does not cause the shock perturbation of the disc boundary (traditional `hotspot'). At the same time, the gas of circumbinary envelope interacts with the stream and causes the formation of an extended shock wave, located on the stream edge. We discuss the implication of this model without `hotspot' (but with a shock wave located outside the disc) for interpretation of observations. The comparison of synthetic light curves with observations proves the validity of the discussed hydrodynamic model without `hotspot'. We also consider the influence of a circumbinary envelope on the mass transfer rate in semidetached binaries. The obtained features of flow structure in the vicinity of L1 show that the gas of circumbinary envelope plays an important role in the flow dynamics, and that it leads to significant (in order of magnitude) increasing of the mass transfer rate. The comparison of gaseous flows structure obtained in 2D and 3D approaches is presented. We discuss the common features of the flow structures and the possible reasons of revealed differences.