• Jan. 11, 2018 astro-ph.IM
    In this paper we describe QUBIC, an experiment that takes up the challenge posed by the detection of primordial gravitational waves with a novel approach, that combines the sensitivity of state-of-the art bolometric detectors with the systematic effects control typical of interferometers. The so-called "self-calibration" is a technique deeply rooted in the interferometric nature of the instrument and allows us to clean the measured data from instrumental effects. The first module of QUBIC is a dual band instrument (150 GHz and 220 GHz) that will be deployed in Argentina during the Fall 2018.
  • QUBIC is an instrument aiming at measuring the B mode polarisation anisotropies at medium scales angular scales (30-200 multipoles). The search for the primordial CMB B-mode polarization signal is challenging, because of many difficulties: smallness of the expected signal, instrumental systematics that could possibly induce polarization leakage from the large E signal into B, brighter than anticipated polarized foregrounds (dust) reducing to zero the initial hope of finding sky regions clean enough to have a direct primordial B-modes observation. The QUBIC instrument is designed to address all aspects of this challenge with a novel kind of instrument, a Bolometric Interferometer, combining the background-limited sensitivity of Transition-Edge-Sensors and the control of systematics allowed by the observation of interference fringe patterns, while operating at two frequencies to disentangle polarized foregrounds from primordial B mode polarization. Its characteristics are described in details in this Technological Design Report.
  • The study of long-term evolution of neutron star (NS) magnetic fields is key to understanding the rich diversity of NS observations, and to unifying their nature despite the different emission mechanisms and observed properties. Such studies in principle permit a deeper understanding of the most important parameters driving their apparent variety, e.g. radio pulsars, magnetars, x-ray dim isolated neutron stars, gamma-ray pulsars. We describe, for the first time, the results from self-consistent magneto-thermal simulations considering not only the effects of the Hall-driven field dissipation in the crust, but adding a complete set of proposed driving forces in a superconducting core. We emphasize how each of these core-field processes drive magnetic evolution and affect observables, and show that when all forces are considered together in vectorial form, the net expulsion of core magnetic flux is negligible, and will have no observable effect in the crust (consequently in the observed surface emission) on megayear time-scales. Our new simulations suggest that strong magnetic fields in NS cores (and the signatures on the NS surface) will persist long after the crustal magnetic field has evolved and decayed, due to the weak combined effects of dissipation and expulsion in the stellar core.
  • Population synthesis studies constitute a powerful method to reconstruct the birth distribution of periods and magnetic fields of the pulsar population. When this method is applied to populations in different wavelengths, it can break the degeneracy in the inferred properties of initial distributions that arises from single-band studies. In this context, we extend previous works to include $X$-ray thermal emitting pulsars within the same evolutionary model as radio-pulsars. We find that the cumulative distribution of the number of X-ray pulsars can be well reproduced by several models that, simultaneously, reproduce the characteristics of the radio-pulsar distribution. However, even considering the most favourable magneto-thermal evolution models with fast field decay, log-normal distributions of the initial magnetic field over-predict the number of visible sources with periods longer than 12 s. We then show that the problem can be solved with different distributions of magnetic field, such as a truncated log-normal distribution, or a binormal distribution with two distinct populations. We use the observational lack of isolated NSs with spin periods P>12 s to establish an upper limit to the fraction of magnetars born with B > 10^{15} G (less than 1\%). As future detections keep increasing the magnetar and high-B pulsar statistics, our approach can be used to establish a severe constraint on the maximum magnetic field at birth of NSs.
  • In 2013 April a new magnetar, SGR 1745-2900, was discovered as it entered an outburst, at only 2.4 arcsec angular distance from the supermassive black hole at the Centre of the Milky Way, Sagittarius A*. SGR 1745-2900 has a surface dipolar magnetic field of ~ 2x10^{14} G, and it is the neutron star closest to a black hole ever observed. The new source was detected both in the radio and X-ray bands, with a peak X-ray luminosity L_X ~ 5x10^{35} erg s^{-1}. Here we report on the long-term Chandra (25 observations) and XMM-Newton (8 observations) X-ray monitoring campaign of SGR 1745-2900, from the onset of the outburst in April 2013 until September 2014. This unprecedented dataset allows us to refine the timing properties of the source, as well as to study the outburst spectral evolution as a function of time and rotational phase. Our timing analysis confirms the increase in the spin period derivative by a factor of ~2 around June 2013, and reveals that a further increase occurred between 2013 Oct 30 and 2014 Feb 21. We find that the period derivative changed from 6.6x10^{-12} s s^{-1} to 3.3x10^{-11} s s^{-1} in 1.5 yr. On the other hand, this magnetar shows a slow flux decay compared to other magnetars and a rather inefficient surface cooling. In particular, starquake-induced crustal cooling models alone have difficulty in explaining the high luminosity of the source for the first ~200 days of its outburst, and additional heating of the star surface from currents flowing in a twisted magnetic bundle is probably playing an important role in the outburst evolution.
  • Diffuse radio emission was detected around the soft gamma-ray repeater SGR 1806-20, after its 2004 powerful giant flare. We study the possible extended X-ray emission at small scales around SGR 1806-20, in two observations by the High Resolution Camera Spectrometer (HRC-S) on board of the Chandra X-ray Observatory: in 2005, 115 days after the giant flare, and in 2013, during quiescence. We compare the radial profiles extracted from data images and PSF simulations, carefully considering various issues related with the uncertain calibration of the HRC PSF at sub-arcsecond scales. We do not see statistically significant excesses pointing to an extended emission on scales of arcseconds. As a consequence, SGR 1806-20 is compatible with being point-like in X-rays, months after the giant flare, as well as in quiescence.
  • According to the partially screened gap scenario, an efficient electron-positron pair creation, a general precondition of radio-pulsar activity, relies on the existence of magnetic spots, i.e., local concentrations of strong and small scale magnetic field structures at the surface of neutron stars. They have a strong impact on the surface temperature, which is potentially observable. Here we reinforce the idea that such magnetic spots can be formed by extracting magnetic energy from the toroidal field that resides in deep crustal layers, via Hall drift. We study and discuss the magneto-thermal evolution of qualitatively different neutron star models and initial magnetic field configurations that lead to the creation of magnetic spots. We find that magnetic spots can be created on a timescale of $10^4$ years with magnetic field strengths $\gtrsim 5\times 10^{13}$ G, provided almost the whole magnetic energy is stored in its toroidal component, and that the conductivity in the inner crust is not too large. The lifetime of the magnetic spots is at least $\sim$one million of years, being longer if the initial field permeates both core and crust.
  • We report on the long term X-ray monitoring of the outburst decay of the low magnetic field magnetar SGR 0418+5729, using all the available X-ray data obtained with RXTE, SWIFT, Chandra, and XMM-Newton observations, from the discovery of the source in June 2009, up to August 2012. The timing analysis allowed us to obtain the first measurement of the period derivative of SGR 0418+5729: \dot{P}=4(1)x10^{-15} s/s, significant at ~3.5 sigma confidence level. This leads to a surface dipolar magnetic field of B_dip ~6x 10^{12} G. This measurement confirms SGR 0418+5729 as the lowest magnetic field magnetar. Following the flux and spectral evolution from the beginning of the outburst up to ~1200 days, we observe a gradual cooling of the tiny hot spot responsible for the X-ray emission, from a temperature of ~0.9 to 0.3 keV. Simultaneously, the X-ray flux decreased by about 3 orders of magnitude: from about 1.4x10^{-11} to 1.2x10^{-14} erg/s/cm^2 . Deep radio, millimeter, optical and gamma-ray observations did not detect the source counterpart, implying stringent limits on its multi-band emission, as well as constraints on the presence of a fossil disk. By modeling the magneto-thermal secular evolution of SGR 0418+5729, we infer a realistic age of ~550 kyr, and a dipolar magnetic field at birth of ~10^{14} G. The outburst characteristics suggest the presence of a thin twisted bundle with a small heated spot at its base. The bundle untwisted in the first few months following the outburst, while the hot spot decreases in temperature and size. We estimate the outburst rate of low magnetic field magnetars to be about one per year per galaxy, and we briefly discuss the consequences of such result in several other astrophysical contexts.
  • The radio pulsar models based on the existence of an inner accelerating gap located above the polar cap rely on the existence of a small scale, strong surface magnetic field $B_s$. This field exceeds the dipolar field $B_d$, responsible for the braking of the pulsar rotation, by at least one order of magnitude. Neither magnetospheric currents nor small scale field components generated during neutron star's birth can provide such field structures in old pulsars. While the former are too weak to create $B_s \gtrsim 5\times 10^{13}$G$\;\gg B_d$, the ohmic decay time of the latter is much shorter than $10^6$ years. We suggest that a large amount of magnetic energy is stored in a toroidal field component that is confined in deeper layers of the crust, where the ohmic decay time exceeds $10^7$ years. This toroidal field may be created by various processes acting early in a neutron star's life. The Hall drift is a non-linear mechanism that, due to the coupling between different components and scales, may be able to create the demanded strong, small scale, magnetic spots. Taking into account both realistic crustal microphysics and a minimal cooling scenario, we show that, in axial symmetry, these field structures are created on a Hall time scale of $10^3$-$10^4$ years. These magnetic spots can be long-lived, thereby fulfilling the pre-conditions for the appearance of the radio pulsar activity. Such magnetic structures created by the Hall drift are not static, and dynamical variations on the Hall time scale are expected in the polar cap region.
  • Nowadays, the analysis of the X-ray spectra of magnetically powered neutron stars or magnetars is one of the most valuable tools to gain insight into the physical processes occurring in their interiors and magnetospheres. In particular, the magnetospheric plasma leaves a strong imprint on the observed X-ray spectrum by means of Compton up-scattering of the thermal radiation coming from the star surface. Motivated by the increased quality of the observational data, much theoretical work has been devoted to develop Monte Carlo (MC) codes that incorporate the effects of resonant Compton scattering in the modeling of radiative transfer of photons through the magnetosphere. The two key ingredients in this simulations are the kinetic plasma properties and the magnetic field (MF) configuration. The MF geometry is expected to be complex, but up to now only mathematically simple solutions (self-similar solutions) have been employed. In this work, we discuss the effects of new, more realistic, MF geometries on synthetic spectra. We use new force-free solutions in a previously developed MC code to assess the influence of MF geometry on the emerging spectra. Our main result is that the shape of the final spectrum is mostly sensitive to uncertain parameters of the magnetospheric plasma, but the MF geometry plays an important role on the angle-dependence of the spectra.