• Using 2MASS photometry of Gaia DR2 sources, we present a technique for selecting upper main sequence stars and giants without the need for individual extinction estimates, to a distance of 7 kpc from the Sun. The spatial distribution of the upper main sequence stars clearly shows the nearest spiral arms, while the large-scale kinematics of the two populations perpendicular to the Galactic plane both show for the first time a clear signature of the warp of the Milky Way.
  • Gaia second Data Release (DR2) presents a first mapping of full-sky RR Lyrae stars and Cepheids observed by the spacecraft during the initial 22 months of observations and publishes characteristic parameters derived for these sources by the Specific Objects Study (SOS) pipeline developed to validate and fully characterise Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars (SOS Cep&RRL) observed by Gaia. The SOS Cep&RRL processing uses tools such as the period-amplitude (PA) and the period-luminosity (PL) relations in the G-band. For the Gaia DR2 data processing we also used tools based on the G_BP and G_RP photometry, such as the period-Wesenheit (PW) relation in G,G_RP. Furthermore, we implemented the use of parallaxes working directly in parallax space and applied different PL, PW relations depending on the source position on sky, whether in the LMC, in the SMC or outside them. G, G_BP and G_RP time series photometry and characterisation by the SOS Cep&RRL pipeline (mean magnitudes and pulsation characteristics) are published in Gaia DR2 for a total of 150,359 sources distributed all over the sky: 9,575 are classified as Cepheids and 140,784 as RR Lyrae stars. These samples include also variables in 87 globular clusters and 12 dwarf galaxies. To the best of our knowledge, as of 25 April 2018, 50,570 of these variables (about 350 Cepheids and 50,220 RR Lyrae stars) do not have a known counterpart in the literature, hence they are likely new discoveries by Gaia. Furthermore, an estimate of the interstellar absorption is published for 54,272 fundamental mode RR Lyrae stars from a relation based on the amplitude of the light variation in the G-band and the star period. Photometric metal abundances ([Fe/H]) derived from the Fourier parameters of the light curves are also released for 64,932 RR Lyrae stars and for 3,738 fundamental-mode classical Cepheids with period shorter than 6.3 days.
  • The Gaia DR2 short timescale variable candidates sample results from the investigation of the first 22 months of Gaia $G$ per-CCD, $G_{BP}$ and $G_{RP}$ photometry, for a subsample of sources at the Gaia faint end ($G \sim 16.5 - 20\,$mag). For this first Gaia short timescale variability search, we limit ourselves to the case of rapid, suspected periodic variability. Our study combines fast variability detection through variogram analysis, Least-Square high frequency search, and empirical selection criterion based on various statistics and built from the investigation of specific sources seen through Gaia eyes (e.g. known variables or visually identified objects with peculiar features in their light-curves). The progressive selection criterion definition, improvement and validation also make use of supplementary ground-based photometric monitoring, performed at the Flemish Mercator telescope in La Palma (Canary Islands, Spain) between August and November 2017. We publish a list of 3018 bona fide, suspected periodic, short timescale variable candidates, spread all over the sky, with a contamination level from false positives and non-periodic variables up to 10-20\% in the Magellanic Clouds. Though its completeness is around 0.05\%, the Gaia DR2 short timescale variables sample recover very interesting known short period variables, such as Post Common Envelope Binaries or Cataclysmic Variables, and points fascinating newly discovered variables sources. Several improvements in the short timescale variability processing are considered for the future Gaia Data Releases, by enhancing the existing variogram and period search algorithms or going one step beyond with the classification of the identified candidates. The encouraging outcome of our analysis demonstrates the power of the Gaia mission for such fast variability studies and opens great perspectives for this domain of astrophysics.
  • Most of the stars in our Galaxy including our Sun, move in a disk-like component and give the Milky Way its characteristic appearance on the night sky. As in all fields in science, motions can be used to reveal the underlying forces, and in the case of disk stars they provide important diagnostics on the structure and history of the Galaxy. But because of the challenges involved in measuring stellar motions, samples have so far remained limited in their number of stars, precision and spatial extent. This has changed dramatically with the second Data Release of the Gaia mission which has just become available. Here we report that the phase space distribution of stars in the disk of the Milky Way is full of substructure with a variety of morphologies, most of which have never been observed before. This includes shapes such as arches and shells in velocity space, and snail shells and ridges when spatial and velocity coordinates are combined. The nature of these substructures implies that the disk is phase mixing from an out of equilibrium state, and that the Galactic bar and/or spiral structure are strongly affecting the orbits of disk stars. Our analysis of the features leads us to infer that the disk was perturbed between 300 and 900 Myr ago, which matches current estimations of the previous pericentric passage of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy. The Gaia data challenge the most basic premise of stellar dynamics of dynamical equilibrium, and show that modelling the Galactic disk as a time-independent axisymmetric component is definitively incorrect. These findings mark the start of a new era when, by modelling the richness of phase space substructures, we can determine the gravitational potential of the Galaxy, its time evolution and the characteristics of the perturbers that have most influenced our home in the Universe.
  • The second Gaia data release is based on 22 months of mission data with an average of 0.9 billion individual CCD observations per day. A data volume of this size and granularity requires a robust and reliable but still flexible system to achieve the demanding accuracy and precision constraints that Gaia is capable of delivering. The internal Gaia photometric system was initialised using an iterative process that is solely based on Gaia data. A set of calibrations was derived for the entire Gaia DR2 baseline and then used to produce the final mean source photometry. The photometric catalogue contains 2.5 billion sources comprised of three different grades depending on the availability of colour information and the procedure used to calibrate them: 1.5 billion gold, 144 million silver, and 0.9 billion bronze. These figures reflect the results of the photometric processing; the content of the data release will be different due to the validation and data quality filters applied during the catalogue preparation. The photometric processing pipeline, PhotPipe, implements all the processing and calibration workflows in terms of Map/Reduce jobs based on the Hadoop platform. This is the first example of a processing system for a large astrophysical survey project to make use of these technologies. The improvements in the generation of the integrated G-band fluxes, in the attitude modelling, in the cross-matching, and and in the identification of spurious detections led to a much cleaner input stream for the photometric processing. This, combined with the improvements in the definition of the internal photometric system and calibration flow, produced high-quality photometry. Hadoop proved to be an excellent platform choice for the implementation of PhotPipe in terms of overall performance, scalability, downtime, and manpower required for operations and maintenance.
  • Aims. We describe the photometric content of the second data release of the Gaia project (Gaia DR2) and its validation along with the quality of the data. Methods. The validation was mainly carried out using an internal analysis of the photometry. External comparisons were also made, but were limited by the precision and systematics that may be present in the external catalogues used. Results. In addition to the photometric quality assessment, we present the best estimates of the three photometric passbands. Various colour-colour transformations are also derived to enable the users to convert between the Gaia and commonly used passbands. Conclusions. The internal analysis of the data shows that the photometric calibrations can reach a precision as low as 2 mmag on individual CCD measurements. Other tests show that systematic effects are present in the data at the 10 mmag level.
  • Aims. The photometric validation of the Gaia DR1 release of the ESA Gaia mission is described and the quality of the data shown. Methods. This is carried out via an internal analysis of the photometry using the most constant sources. Comparisons with external photometric catalogues are also made, but are limited by the accuracies and systematics present in these catalogues. An analysis of the quoted errors is also described. Investigations of the calibration coefficients reveal some of the systematic effects that affect the fluxes. Results. The analysis of the constant sources shows that the early-stage photometric calibrations can reach an accuracy as low as 3 mmag.
  • We present an overview of the Specific Objects Study (SOS) pipeline developed within the Coordination Unit 7 (CU7) of the Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC), the coordination unit charged with the processing and analysis of variable sources observed by Gaia, to validate and fully characterise Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars observed by the spacecraft. We describe how the SOS for Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars (SOS Cep&RRL) was specifically tailored to analyse Gaia's G-band photometric time-series with a South Ecliptic Pole (SEP) footprint, which covers an external region of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). G-band time-series photometry and characterization by the SOS Cep&RRL pipeline (mean magnitude and pulsation characteristics) are published in Gaia Data Release 1 (Gaia DR1) for a total sample of 3,194 variable stars, 599 Cepheids and 2,595 RR Lyrae stars, of which 386 (43 Cepheids and 343 RR Lyrae stars) are new discoveries by Gaia. All 3,194 stars are distributed over an area extending 38 degrees on either side from a point offset from the centre of the LMC by about 3 degrees to the north and 4 degrees to the east. The vast majority, but not all, are located within the LMC. The published sample also includes a few bright RR Lyrae stars that trace the outer halo of the Milky Way in front of the LMC.
  • We report the discovery and characterisation of a deeply eclipsing AM CVn-system, Gaia14aae (= ASSASN-14cn). Gaia14aae was identified independently by the All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN; Shappee et al. 2014) and by the Gaia Science Alerts project, during two separate outbursts. A third outburst is seen in archival Pan-STARRS-1 (PS1; Schlafly et al. 2012; Tonry et al. 2012; Magnier et al. 2013) and ASAS-SN data. Spectroscopy reveals a hot, hydrogen-deficient spectrum with clear double-peaked emission lines, consistent with an accreting double degenerate classification. We use follow-up photometry to constrain the orbital parameters of the system. We find an orbital period of 49.71 min, which places Gaia14aae at the long period extremum of the outbursting AM CVn period distribution. Gaia14aae is dominated by the light from its accreting white dwarf. Assuming an orbital inclination of 90 degrees for the binary system, the contact phases of the white dwarf lead to lower limits of 0.78 M solar and 0.015 M solar on the masses of the accretor and donor respectively and a lower limit on the mass ratio of 0.019. Gaia14aae is only the third eclipsing AM CVn star known, and the first in which the WD is totally eclipsed. Using a helium WD model, we estimate the accretor's effective temperature to be 12900+-200 K. The three out-burst events occurred within 4 months of each other, while no other outburst activity is seen in the previous 8 years of Catalina Real-time Transient Survey (CRTS; Drake et al. 2009), Pan-STARRS-1 and ASAS-SN data. This suggests that these events might be rebrightenings of the first outburst rather than individual events.
  • Gaia is a very ambitious mission of the European Space Agency. At the heart of Gaia lie the measurements of the positions, distances, space motions, brightnesses and astrophysical parameters of stars, which represent fundamental pillars of modern astronomical knowledge. We provide a brief description of the Gaia mission with an emphasis on binary stars. In particular, we summarize results of simulations, which estimate the number of binary stars to be processed to several tens of millions. We also report on the catalogue release scenarios. In the current proposal, the first results for binary stars will be available in 2017 (for a launch in 2013).
  • Two upcoming large scale surveys, the ESA Gaia and LSST projects, will bring a new era in astronomy. The number of binary systems that will be observed and detected by these projects is enormous, estimations range from millions for Gaia to several tens of millions for LSST. We review some tools that should be developed and also what can be gained from these missions on the subject of binaries and exoplanets from the astrometry, photometry, radial velocity and their alert systems.
  • Aims. We demonstrate the feasibility of determining parallaxes for nearby objects with theWide Field Camera on the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) using the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey as a first epoch. We determine physical parameters for ULAS J003402.77-005206.7, one of the coolest brown dwarfs currently known, using atmospheric and evolutionary models with the distance found here. Methods. Observations over the period 10/2005 to 07/2009 were pipeline processed at the Cambridge Astronomical Survey Unit and combined to produce a parallax and proper motion using standard procedures. Results. We determined pi = 79.6 +/- 3.8 mas, mura = -20.0 +/- 3.7 mas/yr and mudec = -363.8 +/- 4.3 mas/yr for ULAS J003402.77-005206.7. Conclusions. We have made a direct parallax determination for one of the coolest objects outside of the solar system. The distance is consistent with a relatively young, 1 - 2 Gyr, low mass, 13 - 20 MJ, cool, 550-600K, brown dwarf. We present a measurement of the radial velocity that is consistent with an age between 0.5 and 4.0 Gyr.
  • The UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey (GPS) is one of the five near infrared Public Legacy Surveys that are being undertaken by the UKIDSS consortium, using the Wide Field Camera on the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope. It is surveying 1868 sq.deg. of the northern and equatorial Galactic plane at Galactic latitudes -5<b<5 in the J, H and K filters and a ~200 sq.deg. area of the Taurus-Auriga-Perseus molecular cloud complex in these three filters and the 2.12 um (1-0) H_2 filter. It will provide data on ~2 billion sources. Here we describe the properties of the dataset and provide a user's guide for its exploitation. We also present brief Demonstration Science results from DR2 and from the Science Verification programme. These results illustrate how GPS data will frequently be combined with data taken in other wavebands to produce scientific results. The Demonstration Science includes studies of: (i) the star formation region G28.983-0.603, cross matching with Spitzer-GLIMPSE data to identify YSOs; (ii) the M17 nebula; (iii) H_2 emission in the rho Ophiuchi dark cloud; (iv) X-ray sources in the Galactic Centre; (v) external galaxies in the Zone of Avoidance; (vi) IPHAS-GPS optical-infrared spectrophotometric typing. (abridged).
  • The First Data Release (DR1) of the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) took place on 2006 July 21. UKIDSS is a set of five large near-infrared surveys, covering a complementary range of areas, depths, and Galactic latitudes. DR1 is the first large release of survey-quality data from UKIDSS and includes 320 sq degs of multicolour data to (Vega) K=18, complete (depending on the survey) in three to five bands from the set ZYJHK, together with 4 sq degs of deep JK data to an average depth K=21. In addition the release includes a similar quantity of data with incomplete filter coverage. In JHK, in regions of low extinction, the photometric uniformity of the calibration is better than 0.02 mag. in each band. The accuracy of the calibration in ZY remains to be quantified, and the same is true of JHK in regions of high extinction. The median image FWHM across the dataset is 0.82 arcsec. We describe changes since the Early Data Release in the implementation, pipeline and calibration, quality control, and archive procedures. We provide maps of the areas surveyed, and summarise the contents of each of the five surveys in terms of filters, areas, and depths. DR1 marks completion of 7 per cent of the UKIDSS 7-year goals.
  • The UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) is a set of five large near-infrared surveys, covering a complementary range of areas, depths, and Galactic latitudes. The UKIDSS Second Data Release (DR2) includes the First Data Release (DR1), with minor improvements, plus new data for the LAS, GPS, GCS, and DXS, from observations made over 2006 May through July (when the UDS was unobservable). DR2 was staged in two parts. The first part excluded the GPS, and took place on 2007 March 1. The GPS was released on 2007 April 12. DR2 includes 282 sq. degs of multicolour data to (Vega) K=18, complete in the full YJHK set for the LAS, 57 sq. degs in the ZYJHK set for the GCS, and 236 sq. degs in the JHK set for the GPS. DR2 includes nearly 7 sq. degs of deep JK data (DXS, UDS) to an average depth K=21. In addition the release includes a comparable quantity of data where coverage of the filter set for any survey is incomplete. We document changes that have occurred since DR1 to the pipeline, calibration, and archive procedures. The two most noteworthy changes are presentation of the data in a single database (compared to two previously), and provision of additional error flags for detected sources, flagging potentially spurious artifacts, corrupted data and suspected cross-talk sources. We summarise the contents of each of the surveys in terms of filters, areas, and depths.
  • This paper contains the general data reduction methods used in processing the data from the Carlsberg Meridian Telescope CCD Drift Scan Survey. An efficient method to calibrate the fluctuations in the positions of the images caused by atmospheric turbulence is described. The external accuracy achieved is 36 mas in right ascension and declination. A description of the recently released catalogue is given.