• Key performance characteristics are demonstrated for the microwave SQUID multiplexer ($\mu$MUX) coupled to transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers that have been optimized for cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations. In a 64-channel demonstration, we show that the $\mu$MUX produces a white, input referred current noise level of 29~pA$/\sqrt{\mathrm{Hz}}$ at -77~dB microwave probe tone power, which is well below expected fundamental detector and photon noise sources for a ground-based CMB-optimized bolometer. Operated with negligible photon loading, we measure 98~pA$/\sqrt{\mathrm{Hz}}$ in the TES-coupled channels biased at 65% of the sensor normal resistance. This noise level is consistent with that predicted from bolometer thermal fluctuation (i.e., phonon) noise. Furthermore, the power spectral density exhibits a white spectrum at low frequencies ($\sim$~100~mHz), which enables CMB mapping on large angular scales that constrain the physics of inflation. Additionally, we report cross-talk measurements that indicate a level below 0.3%, which is less than the level of cross-talk from multiplexed readout systems in deployed CMB imagers. These measurements demonstrate the $\mu$MUX as a viable readout technique for future CMB imaging instruments.
  • We introduce a new technique for determining x-ray fluorescence line energies and widths, and we present measurements made with this technique of 22 x-ray L lines from lanthanide-series elements. The technique uses arrays of transition-edge sensors, microcalorimeters with high energy-resolving power that simultaneously observe both calibrated x-ray standards and the x-ray emission lines under study. The uncertainty in absolute line energies is generally less than 0.4 eV in the energy range of 4.5 keV to 7.5 keV. Of the seventeen line energies of neodymium, samarium, and holmium, thirteen are found to be consistent with the available x-ray reference data measured after 1990; only two of the four lines for which reference data predate 1980, however, are consistent with our results. Five lines of terbium are measured with uncertainties that improve on those of existing data by factors of two or more. These results eliminate a significant discrepancy between measured and calculated x-ray line energies for the terbium Ll line (5.551 keV). The line widths are also measured, with uncertainties of 0.6 eV or less on the full-width at half-maximum in most cases. These measurements were made with an array of approximately one hundred superconducting x- ray microcalorimeters, each sensitive to an energy band from 1 keV to 8 keV. No energy-dispersive spectrometer has previously been used for absolute-energy estimation at this level of accuracy. Future spectrometers, with superior linearity and energy resolution, will allow us to improve on these results and expand the measurements to more elements and a wider range of line energies.
  • In recent years, the progress on low temperature detector technologies has allowed design of large scale experiments aiming at pushing down the sensitivity on the neutrino mass below 1\,eV. Even with outstanding performances in both energy ($\sim$eV on keV) and time resolution ($\sim 1\,\mu$s) on the single channel, a large number of detectors working in parallel is required to reach a sub-eV sensitivity. HOLMES is a new experiment to directly measure the neutrino mass with a sensitivity as low as 2\,eV. HOLMES will perform a calorimetric measurement of the energy released in the electron capture (EC) decay of 163Ho. In its final configuration, HOLMES will deploy 1000 detectors of low temperature microcalorimeters with implanted 163Ho nuclei. The baseline sensors for HOLMES are Mo/Cu TESs (Transition Edge Sensors) on SiN\textsubscript{x} membrane with gold absorbers. The readout is based on the use of rf-SQUIDs as input devices with flux ramp modulation for linearization purposes; the rf-SQUID is then coupled to a superconducting lambda/4-wave resonator in the GHz range, and the modulated signal is finally read out using the homodyne technique. The TES detectors have been designed with the aim of achieving an energy resolution of a few eV at the spectrum endpoint and a time resolution of a few micro-seconds, in order to minimize pile-up artifacts.
  • A performance evaluation of superconducting transition-edge sensors (TESs) in the environment of a pion beam line at a particle accelerator is presented. Averaged across the 209 functioning sensors in the array, the achieved energy resolution is 5.2 eV FWHM at Co $K_{\alpha}$ (6.9 keV) when the pion beam is off and 7.3 eV at a beam rate of 1.45 MHz. Absolute energy uncertainty of $\pm$0.04 eV is demonstrated for Fe $K_{\alpha}$ (6.4 keV) with in-situ energy calibration obtained from other nearby known x-ray lines. To achieve this small uncertainty, it is essential to consider the non-Gaussian energy response of the TESs and thermal cross-talk pile-up effects due to charged-particle hits in the silicon substrate of the TES array.
  • We introduce a filter-construction method for pulse processing that differs in two respects from that in standard optimal filtering, in which the average pulse shape and noise-power spectral density are combined to create a convolution filter for estimating pulse heights. First, the proposed filters are computed in the time domain, to avoid periodicity artifacts of the discrete Fourier transform, and second, orthogonality constraints are imposed on the filters, to reduce the filtering procedure's sensitivity to unknown baseline height and pulse tails. We analyze the proposed filters, predicting energy resolution under several scenarios, and apply the filters to high-rate pulse data from gamma-rays measured by a transition-edge-sensor microcalorimeter.