• Deriving physical parameters from gamma-ray burst afterglow observations remains a challenge, even now, 20 years after the discovery of afterglows. The main reason for the lack of progress is that the peak of the synchrotron emission is in the sub-mm range, thus requiring radio observations in conjunction with X-ray/optical/near-infrared data in order to measure the corresponding spectral slopes and consequently remove the ambiguity wrt. slow vs. fast cooling and the ordering of the characteristic frequencies. We observed GRB 151027B, the 1000th Swift-detected GRB, with GROND in the optical-NIR, ALMA in the sub-millimeter, ATCA in the radio band, and combine this with public Swift-XRT X-ray data. While some observations at crucial times only return upper limits or surprising features, the fireball model is narrowly constrained by our data set, and allows us to draw a consistent picture with a fully-determined parameter set. Surprisingly, we find rapid, large-amplitude flux density variations in the radio band which are extreme not only for GRBs, but generally for any radio source. We interpret these as scintillation effects, though the extreme nature requires either the scattering screen to be at much smaller distance than usually assumed, multiple screens, or a combination of the two.
  • We present the extensive follow-up campaign on the afterglow of GRB 110715A at 17 different wavelengths, from X-ray to radio bands, starting 81 seconds after the burst and extending up to 74 days later. We performed for the first time a GRB afterglow observation with the ALMA observatory. We find that the afterglow of GRB 110715A is very bright at optical and radio wavelengths. We use optical and near infrared spectroscopy to provide further information about the progenitor's environment and its host galaxy. The spectrum shows weak absorption features at a redshift z = 0.8225, which reveal a host galaxy environment with low ionization, column density and dynamical activity. Late deep imaging shows a very faint galaxy, consistent with the spectroscopic results. The broadband afterglow emission is modelled with synchrotron radiation using a numerical algorithm and we determine the best fit parameters using Bayesian inference in order to constrain the physical parameters of the jet and the medium in which the relativistic shock propagates. We fitted our data with a variety of models, including different density profiles and energy injections. Although the general behaviour can be roughly described by these models, none of them are able to fully explain all data points simultaneously. GRB 110715A shows the complexity of reproducing extensive multi-wavelength broadband afterglow observations, and the need of good sampling in wavelength and time and more complex models to accurately constrain the physics of GRB afterglows.
  • We report on the detection of a bright, short, structured X-ray burst coming from the supernova remnant RCW 103 on 2016 June 22 caught by the Swift/BAT monitor, and on the follow-up campaign made with Swift/XRT, Swift/UVOT and the optical/NIR GROND detector. The characteristics of this flash, such as duration, and spectral shape, are consistent with typical short bursts observed from soft gamma repeaters. The BAT error circle at 68 per cent confidence range encloses the point-like X-ray source at the centre of the nebula, 1E161348-5055. Its nature has been long debated due to a periodicity of 6.67 hr in X-rays, which could indicate either an extremely slow pulsating neutron star, or the orbital period of a very compact X-ray binary system. We found that 20 min before the BAT trigger, the soft X-ray emission of 1E161348-5055 was a factor of ~100 higher than measured 2 yr earlier, indicating that an outburst had already started. By comparing the spectral and timing characteristics of the source in the two years before the outburst and after the BAT event, we find that, besides a change in luminosity and spectral shape, also the 6.67 hr pulsed profile has significantly changed with a clear phase shift with respect to its low-flux profile. The UV/optical/NIR observations did not reveal any counterpart at the position of 1E161348-5055. Based on these findings, we associate the BAT burst with 1E161348-5055, we classify it as a magnetar, and pinpoint the 6.67 hr periodicity as the magnetar spin period.
  • We report the early discovery of the optical afterglow of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 140801A in the 137 deg$^2$ 3-$\sigma$ error-box of the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). MASTER is the only observatory that automatically react to all Fermi alerts. GRB 140801A is one of the few GRBs whose optical counterpart was discovered solely from its GBM localization. The optical afterglow of GRB 140801A was found by MASTER Global Robotic Net 53 sec after receiving the alert, making it the fastest optical detection of a GRB from a GBM error-box. Spectroscopy obtained with the 10.4-m Gran Telescopio Canarias and the 6-m BTA of SAO RAS reveals a redshift of $z=1.32$. We performed optical and near-infrared photometry of GRB 140801A using different telescopes with apertures ranging from 0.4-m to 10.4-m. GRB 140801A is a typical burst in many ways. The rest-frame bolometric isotropic energy release and peak energy of the burst is $E_\mathrm{iso} = 5.54_{-0.24}^{+0.26} \times 10^{52}$ erg and $E_\mathrm{p, rest}\simeq280$ keV, respectively, which is consistent with the Amati relation. The absence of a jet break in the optical light curve provides a lower limit on the half-opening angle of the jet $\theta=6.1$ deg. The observed $E_\mathrm{peak}$ is consistent with the limit derived from the Ghirlanda relation. The joint Fermi GBM and Konus-Wind analysis shows that GRB 140801A could belong to the class of intermediate duration. The rapid detection of the optical counterpart of GRB 140801A is especially important regarding the upcoming experiments with large coordinate error-box areas.
  • Over the last decade there has been immense progress in the follow-up of short and long GRBs, resulting in a significant rise in the detection rate of X-ray and optical afterglows, in the determination of GRB redshifts, and of the identification of the underlying host galaxies. Nevertheless, our theoretical understanding on the progenitors and central engines powering these vast explosions is lagging behind, and a newly identified class of `ultra-long' GRBs has fuelled speculation on the existence of a new channel of GRB formation. In this paper we present high signal-to-noise X-shooter observations of the host galaxy of GRB130925A, which is the fourth unambiguously identified ultra-long GRB, with prompt gamma-ray emission detected for ~20ks. The GRB line of sight was close to the host galaxy nucleus, and our spectroscopic observations cover both this region along the bulge/disk of the galaxy, in addition to a bright star-forming region within the outskirts of the galaxy. From our broad wavelength coverage we obtain accurate metallicity and dust-extinction measurements at both the galaxy nucleus, and an outer star-forming region, and measure a super-solar metallicity at both locations, placing this galaxy within the 10-20% most metal-rich GRB host galaxies. Such a high metal enrichment has implications on the progenitor models of both long and ultra-long GRBs, although the edge-on orientation of the host galaxy does not allow us to rule out a large metallicity variation along our line of sight. The spatially resolved spectroscopic data presented in this paper offer important insight into variations in the metal and dust abundance within GRB host galaxies. They also illustrate the need for IFU observations on a larger sample of GRB host galaxies at varies metallicities to provide a more quantitative view on the relation between the GRB circumburst and the galaxy-whole properties.
  • In order to constrain the broad-band spectral energy distribution of the afterglow of GRB 100621A, dedicated observations were performed in the optical/near-infrared with the 7-channel "Gamma-Ray Burst Optical and Near-infrared Detector" (GROND) at the 2.2m MPG/ESO telescope, in the sub-millimeter band with the large bolometer array LABOCA at APEX, and at radio frequencies with ATCA. Utilizing also Swift X-ray observations, we attempt an interpretation of the observational data within the fireball scenario. The afterglow of GRB 100621A shows a very complex temporal as well as spectral evolution. We identify three different emission components, the most spectacular one causing a sudden intensity jump about one hour after the prompt emission. The spectrum of this component is much steeper than the canonical afterglow. We interpret this component using the prescription of Vlasis et al. (2011) for a two-shell collision after the first shell has been decelerated by the circumburst medium. We use the fireball scenario to derive constraints on the microphysical parameters of the first shell. Long-term energy injection into a narrow jet seems to provide an adequate description. Another noteworthy result is the large ($A_V$ = 3.6 mag) line-of-sight host extinction of the afterglow in an otherwise extremely blue host galaxy.
  • We report the detection of a faint optical flash by the 2-m Faulkes Telescope North simultaneously with the second of two prompt gamma-ray pulses in INTEGRAL gamma-ray burst (GRB) 080603A, beginning at t_rest = 37 s after the onset of the GRB. This optical flash appears to be distinct from the subsequent emerging afterglow emission, for which we present comprehensive broadband radio to X-ray light curves to 13 days post-burst and rigorously test the standard fireball model. The intrinsic extinction toward GRB 080603A is high (A_V,z = 0.8 mag), and the well-sampled X-ray-to-near-infrared spectral energy distribution is interesting in requiring an LMC2 extinction profile, in contrast to the majority of GRBs. Comparison of the gamma-ray and extinction-corrected optical flux densities of the flash rules out an inverse-Compton origin for the prompt gamma-rays; instead, we suggest that the optical flash could originate from the inhomogeneity of the relativistic flow. In this scenario, a large velocity irregularity in the flow produces the prompt gamma-rays, followed by a milder internal shock at a larger radius that would cause the optical flash. Flat gamma-ray spectra, roughly F propto nu^-0.1, are observed in many GRBs. If the flat spectrum extends down to the optical band in GRB 080603A, the optical flare could be explained as the low-energy tail of the gamma-ray emission. If this is indeed the case, it provides an important clue to understanding the nature of the emission process in the prompt phase of GRBs and highlights the importance of deep (R> 20 mag), rapid follow-up observations capable of detecting faint, prompt optical emission.
  • Context. After the launch of the Swift satellite, the Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) optical light-curve smoothness paradigm has been questioned thanks to the faster and better sampled optical follow-up, which has unveiled a very complex behaviour. This complexity is triggering the interest of the whole GRB community. The GROND multi-channel imager is used to study optical and near-infrared (NIR) afterglows of GRBs with unprecedented optical and near-infrared temporal and spectral resolution. The GRB 081029 has a very prominent optical rebrightening event and is an outstanding example of the application of the multi-channel imager to GRB afterglows. Aims. Here we exploit the rich GROND multi-colour follow-up of GRB 081029 combined with XRT observations to study the nature of late-time rebrightenings that appear in the optical-NIR light-curves of some GRB afterglows. Methods. We analyse the optical and NIR observations obtained with the seven-channel Gamma-Ray burst Optical and Near-infrared Detector (GROND) at the 2.2 m MPI/ESO telescope and the X-ray data obtained with the XRT telescope on board the Swift observatory. The multi-wavelength temporal and spectral evolution is discussed in the framework of different physical models. Results. The extremely steep optical and NIR rebrightening observed in GRB 081029 cannot be explained in the framework of the standard forward shock afterglow model. The absence of a contemporaneous X-ray rebrightening and the evidence of a strong spectral evolution in the optical-NIR bands during the rise suggest two separate components that dominate in the early and late-time lightcurves, respectively. The steepness of the optical rise cannot be explained even in the framework of the alternative scenarios proposed in the literature unless a late-time activity of the central engine is assumed.
  • The possible existence of a continuum encompassing the diversity of explosive stellar deaths,ranging from ordinary SNe to relativistic hypernovae associated with long duration GRBs, is under intense debate. In this context, SN2008D associated with XT080109 could represent a paradigmatic case, since it might exemplify a potential borderline event. The main aim is to infer geometric information of SN2008D through the evolution of its linear optical polarization. We also report the polarization evolution of SN2007uy, and discuss the properties of the host ISM towards the XT. The final goal is to compare the polarization properties, and hence the geometries of both SNe, which shone contemporaneously in NGC2770. This fortunate coincidence brought us the opportunity to observe both SNe simultaneously, and most importantly, with identical instrumental setups. The observations span 74.9 days, starting 3.6 days after the XT and are distributed in 11 visits. In addition we performed observations in the mm range in order to identify the dominant polarization. We report positive linear polarization detections at several epochs for SN2008D at a level of ~1% and at ~1.5% for SN2007uy. SN2007uy shows constant polarization, which could be described by the host interstellar polarization plus a constant eccentricity expansion on the sky plane. A statistical analysis of the distribution of the SN2008D Stokes parametres suggests that it could show an intrinsic variable polarization component. Assuming the SN2007uy polarization is constant, we find that the evolution of the intrinsic SN2008D polarization could be explained by an aspherical axisymmetric expansion with variable eccentricity. We come to the same result even if we make no assumption on SN2007uy, although at a lower significance level. We suggest that at least the projected, if not the intrinsic, geometries of both SNe could differ.
  • We report on the detection by Swift of GRB 080913, and subsequent optical/near-infrared follow-up observations by GROND which led to the discovery of its optical/NIR afterglow and the recognition of its high-z nature via the detection of a spectral break between the i' and z' bands. Spectroscopy obtained at the ESO-VLT revealed a continuum extending down to lambda = 9400 A, and zero flux for 7500 A < lambda<9400 A, which we interpret as the onset of a Gunn-Peterson trough at z=6.695+-0.025 (95.5% conf. level), making GRB 080913 the highest redshift GRB to date, and more distant than the highest-redshift QSO. We note that many redshift indicators which are based on promptly available burst or afterglow properties have failed for GRB 080913. We report on our follow-up campaign and compare the properties of GRB 080913 with bursts at lower redshift. In particular, since the afterglow of this burst is fainter than typical for GRBs, we show that 2m-class telescopes can identify most high-redshift GRBs.
  • Soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) are a rare type of gamma-ray transient sources that are ocasionally detected as bursts in the high-energy sky. They are thought to be produced by magnetars, young neutron stars with very strong magnetic fields of the order of 10^(14-15) G. Only three such objects are known in our Galaxy, and a fourth one is associated with the supernova remnant N49 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. In none of these cases has an optical counterpart to either the gamma-ray flares or the quiescent source been identified. Here we present multi-wavelength observations of a puzzling source, SWIFT J195509+261406, for which we detected more than 40 flaring episodes in the optical band over a time span of 3 days, plus a faint infrared flare 11 days later, after which it returned to quiescence. We propose that SWIFT J195509+261406 is a member of a subgroup of SGRs for which the long-term X-ray emission is transient in nature. Furthermore, it is the first SGR for which bursts have been detected in the optical and near-infrared bands and maybe the link between the "persistent" SGRs and the dim isolated neutron stars.
  • Although it is well recognized that gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows are obscured and reddened by dust in their host galaxies, the wavelength-dependence and quantity of dust extinction are still poorly known. Current studies on this mostly rely on fitting the afterglow spectral energy distributions (SEDs) with template extinction models. The inferred extinction (both quantity and wavelength-dependence) and dust-to-gas ratios are often in disagreement with that obtained from dust depletion and X-ray spectroscopy studies. We argue that this discrepancy could result from the prior assumption of a template extinction law. We propose an analytical formula to approximate the GRB host extinction law. With the template extinction laws self-contained, and the capability of revealing extinction laws differing from the conventional ones, it is shown that this is a powerful approach in modeling the afterglow SEDs to derive GRB host extinction.
  • We present and discuss the results of an extensive observational campaign devoted to GRB071010A, a long-duration gamma-ray burst detected by the Swift satellite. This event was followed for almost a month in the optical/near-infrared (NIR) with various telescopes starting from about 2min after the high-energy event. Swift-XRT observations started only later at about 0.4d. The light-curve evolution allows us to single out an initial rising phase with a maximum at about 7min, possibly the afterglow onset in the context of the standard fireball model, which is then followed by a smooth decay interrupted by a sharp rebrightening at about 0.6d. The rebrightening was visible in both the optical/NIR and X-rays and can be interpreted as an episode of discrete energy injection, although various alternatives are possible. A steepening of the afterglow light curve is recorded at about 1d. The entire evolution of the optical/NIR afterglow is consistent with being achromatic. This could be one of the few identified GRB afterglows with an achromatic break in the X-ray through the optical/NIR bands. Polarimetry was also obtained at about 1d, just after the rebrightening and almost coincident with the steepening. This provided a fairly tight upper limit of 0.9% for the polarized-flux fraction.
  • We report early follow-up observations of the error box of the short burst 050813 using the telescopes at Calar Alto and at Observatorio Sierra Nevada (OSN), followed by deep VLT/FORS2 I-band observations obtained under very good seeing conditions 5.7 and 11.7 days after the event. Neither a fading afterglow, nor a rising SN component was found, so the potential GRB host galaxy has not been identified based on a comparison of the two VLT images taken at different epoches. We discuss if any of the galaxies present in the original 10 arcsec XRT error circle could be the host. In any case, the optical afterglow of GRB 050813 was of very low luminosity. We conclude that all these properties are consistent with the binary compact merger hypothesis for the progenitor of GRB 050813.
  • We present optical photometry and spectroscopy of the afterglow and host galaxy of gamma-ray burst 040924. This GRB had a rather short duration of T90 ~2.4s, and a well sampled optical afterglow light curve. We aim to use this dataset to find further evidence that this burst is consistent with a massive star core-collapse progenitor. We combine the afterglow data reported here with data taken from the literature and compare the host properties with survey data. We find that the global behaviour of the optical afterglow is well fit by a broken power-law, with a break at ~0.03 days. We determine the redshift z = 0.858 +/- 0.001 from the detected emission lines in our spectrum. Using the spectrum and photometry we derive global properties of the host, showing it to have similar properties to long GRB hosts. We detect the [Ne III] emission line in the spectrum, and compare the fluxes of this line of a sample of 15 long GRB host galaxies with survey data, showing the long GRB hosts to be comparable to local metal-poor emission line galaxies in their [Ne III] emission. We fit the supernova bump accompanying this burst, and find that it is similar to other long GRB supernova bumps, but fainter. All properties of GRB 040924 are consistent with an origin in the core-collapse of a massive star: the supernova, the spectrum and SED of the host and the afterglow.
  • The availability of multi-wavelength high-quality data of gamma-ray burst afterglows in the Swift era, contrary to the expectations, did not allow us to fully confirm yet one of the most fundamental features of the standard afterglow picture: the presence of an achromatic break in the decaying light curve. We briefly review the most interesting cases identified so far.
  • We present multiwavelength observations of the gamma-ray burst GRB 051028 detected by HETE-2 in order to derive its afterglow emission parameters and to determine the reason for its optical faintness when compared to other events. Observations were taken in the optical (2.0m Himalayan Chandra Telescope, 1.34m Tautenburg, 4.2m William Herschel Telescope) and in X-rays (Swift/XRT) between 2.7 hours and 10 days after the onset of the event. The data can be interpreted by collimated emission in a jet with a typical value of $p$ = 2.4 which is moving in an homogeneous interstellar medium and with a cooling frequency nu_{c} still above the X-rays at 0.5 days after the burst onset. GRB 051028 can be classified as a ``gray'' or ``potentially dark'' GRB. On the basis of the combined optical and Swift/XRT data, we conclude that the reason for the optical dimness is not extra absorption in the host galaxy, but rather the GRB taking place at high-redshift.We also notice the very striking similarity with the optical lightcurve of GRB 050730, a burst with a spectroscopic redshift of 3.967, although GRB 051028 is about 3 mag fainter. We suggest that the bump could be explained by multiple energy injection episodes and that the burst is intrinsically faint when compared to the average afterglows detected since 1997. The non-detection of the host galaxy down to R = 25.1 is also consistent with the burst arising at high redshift, compatible with the published pseudo-z of 3.7 +/- 1.8.
  • Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are associated with type Ic supernovae that are more luminous than average and that eject material at very high velocities. Less-luminous supernovae were not hitherto known to be associated with GRBs, and therefore GRB-supernovae were thought to be rare events. Whether X-ray flashes - analogues of GRBs, but with lower luminosities and fewer gamma-rays - can also be associated with supernovae, and whether they are intrinsically 'weak' events or typical GRBs viewed off the axis of the burst, is unclear. Here we report the optical discovery and follow-up observations of the type Ic supernova SN 2006aj associated with X-ray flash XRF 060218. Supernova 2006aj is intrinsically less luminous than the GRB-supernovae, but more luminous than many supernovae not accompanied by a GRB. The ejecta velocities derived from our spectra are intermediate between these two groups, which is consistent with the weakness of both the GRB output and the supernova radio flux. Our data, combined with radio and X-ray observations, suggest that XRF 060218 is an intrinsically weak and soft event, rather than a classical GRB observed off-axis. This extends the GRB-supernova connection to X-ray flashes and fainter supernovae, implying a common origin. Events such as XRF 060218 are probably more numerous than GRB-supernovae.