• The ionosphere is the main driver of a series of systematic effects that limit our ability to explore the low frequency (<1 GHz) sky with radio interferometers. Its effects become increasingly important towards lower frequencies and are particularly hard to calibrate in the low signal-to-noise ratio regime in which low-frequency telescopes operate. In this paper we characterize and quantify the effect of ionospheric-induced systematic errors on astronomical interferometric radio observations at ultra-low frequencies (<100 MHz). We also provide guidelines for observations and data reduction at these frequencies with the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) and future instruments such as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). We derive the expected systematic error induced by the ionosphere. We compare our predictions with data from the Low Band Antenna (LBA) system of LOFAR. We show that we can isolate the ionospheric effect in LOFAR LBA data and that our results are compatible with satellite measurements, providing an independent way to measure the ionospheric total electron content (TEC). We show how the ionosphere also corrupts the correlated amplitudes through scintillations. We report values of the ionospheric structure function in line with the literature. The systematic errors on the phases of LOFAR LBA data can be accurately modelled as a sum of four effects (clock, ionosphere 1st, 2nd, and 3rd order). This greatly reduces the number of required calibration parameters, and therefore enables new efficient calibration strategies.
  • Mechanical feedback via Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) jets in the centres of galaxy groups and clusters is a crucial ingredient in current models of galaxy formation and cluster evolution. Jet feedback is believed to regulate gas cooling and thus star formation in the most massive galaxies, but a robust physical understanding of this feedback mode is currently lacking. The large collecting area, excellent spectral resolution and high spatial resolution of Athena+ will provide the breakthrough diagnostic ability necessary to develop this understanding, via: (1) the first kinematic measurements on relevant spatial scales of the hot gas in galaxy, group and cluster haloes as it absorbs the impact of AGN jets, and (2) vastly improved ability to map thermodynamic conditions on scales well-matched to the jets, lobes and gas disturbances produced by them. Athena+ will therefore determine for the first time how jet energy is dissipated and distributed in group and cluster gas, and how a feedback loop operates in group/cluster cores to regulate gas cooling and AGN fuelling. Athena+ will also establish firmly the cumulative impact of powerful radio galaxies on the evolution of baryons from the epoch of group/cluster formation to the present day.
  • (abridged) We identify a numerically significant population of heavily obscured AGNs at z~0.5-1 in the Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) and Extended Chandra Deep Field-South by selecting 242 X-ray undetected objects with infrared-based star formation rates (SFRs) substantially higher (a factor of 3.2 or more) than their SFRs determined from the UV after correcting for dust extinction. An X-ray stacking analysis of 23 candidates in the central CDF-S region using the 4 Ms Chandra data reveals a hard X-ray signal with an effective power-law photon index of Gamma=0.6_{-0.4}^{+0.3}, indicating a significant contribution from obscured AGNs. Based on Monte Carlo simulations, we conclude that 74+-25% of the selected galaxies host obscured AGNs, within which ~95% are heavily obscured and ~80% are Compton-thick (CT; NH>1.5x10^{24} cm^{-2}). The heavily obscured objects in our sample are of moderate intrinsic X-ray luminosity [ ~ (0.9-4)x10^{42} erg/s in the 2-10 keV band]. The space density of the CT AGNs is (1.6+-0.5)x10^{-4} Mpc^{-3}. The z~0.5-1 CT objects studied here are expected to contribute ~1% of the total XRB flux in the 10-30 keV band, and they account for ~5-15% of the emission in this energy band expected from all CT AGNs according to population-synthesis models. In the 6--8 keV band, the stacked signal of the 23 heavily obscured candidates accounts for <5% of the unresolved XRB flux, while the unresolved ~25% of the XRB in this band can probably be explained by a stacking analysis of the X-ray undetected optical galaxies in the CDF-S (a 2.5 sigma stacked signal). We discuss prospects to identify such heavily obscured objects using future hard X-ray observatories.
  • We use the 4Ms CDF-S survey to place direct X-ray constraints on the ubiquity of z~2 heavily obscured AGNs in K<22 BzK galaxies. Forty seven of the 222 BzK galaxies in the central region of the CDF-S are detected at X-ray energies, 11 of which have hard X-ray spectral slopes (Gamma<1) indicating the presence of heavily obscured AGN activity. The other 36 X-ray detected BzK galaxies appear to be relatively unobscured AGNs and starburst galaxies; we use X-ray variability analyses over a rest-frame baseline of ~3 years to further confirm the presence of AGN activity in many of these systems. The majority (7 out of 11) of the heavily obscured AGNs have excess IR emission over that expected from star formation (termed "IR-excess galaxies"). However, we find that X-ray detected heavily obscured AGNs only comprise ~25% of the IR-excess galaxy population, which is otherwise composed of relatively unobscured AGNs and starburst galaxies. We find that the typical X-ray spectrum of the heavily obscured AGNs is better characterized by a pure reflection model than an absorbed power-law model, suggesting extreme Compton-thick absorption in some systems. We verify this result by producing a composite rest-frame 2-20 keV spectrum, which has a similar shape as a reflection-dominated X-ray spectrum and reveals an emission feature at rest-frame energy ~6.4 keV, likely to be due to Fe K. These heavily obscured AGNs are likely to be the distant analogs of the reflection-dominated AGNs recently identified at z~0 with >10 keV observatories. On the basis of these analyses we estimate the space density for typical (intrinsic X-ray luminosities of L_X>1E43 erg/s) heavily obscured and Compton-thick AGNs at z~2. Our space-density constraints are conservative lower limits but they are already consistent with the range of predictions from X-ray background models.
  • [abridged] We present point-source catalogs for the 4Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S), which is the deepest Chandra survey to date and covers an area of 464.5 arcmin^2. We provide a main source catalog, which contains 740 X-ray point sources that are detected with wavdetect at a false-positive probability threshold of 1E-5 and also satisfy a binomial-probability source-selection criterion of P<0.004; this approach is designed to maximize the number of reliable sources detected. A total of 300 main-catalog sources are new compared to the previous 2Ms CDF-S main-catalog sources. We also provide a supplementary catalog, which consists of 36 sources that are detected with wavdetect at 1E-5, satisfy 0.004< P<0.1, and have an optical counterpart with R<24. Multiwavelength identifications, basic optical/infrared/radio photometry, and spectroscopic/photometric redshifts are provided for the X-ray sources. Basic analyses of the X-ray and multiwavelength properties of the sources indicate that >75% of the main-catalog sources are AGNs; of the 300 new main-catalog sources, about 35% are likely normal and starburst galaxies, reflecting the rise of normal and starburst galaxies at the very faint flux levels uniquely accessible to the 4Ms CDF-S. Near the center of the 4Ms CDF-S, the observed AGN and galaxy source densities have reached ~9800 and 6900 per square degree, respectively. The 4 Ms CDF-S reaches on-axis flux limits of ~9.1E-18 and 5.5E-17 erg/cm^2/s for the soft and hard bands, respectively. An increase in the CDF-S exposure by a factor of ~2-2.5 would provide further significant gains and probe key unexplored discovery space.
  • [Abridged] We present reliable multiwavelength identifications and high-quality photometric redshifts for the 462 X-ray sources in the ~2 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South. Source identifications are carried out using deep optical-to-radio multiwavelength catalogs, and are then combined to create lists of primary and secondary counterparts for the X-ray sources. We identified reliable counterparts for 446 (96.5%) of the X-ray sources, with an expected false-match probability of ~6.2%. A likelihood-ratio method is used for source matching, which effectively reduces the false-match probability at faint magnitudes compared to a simple error-circle matching method. We construct a master photometric catalog for the identified X-ray sources including up to 42 bands of UV-to-infrared data, and then calculate their photometric redshifts (photo-z's). The reliability of the photo-z's is evaluated using the subsample of 220 sources with secure spectroscopic redshifts. We achieve an accuracy of ~1% [|Delta z|/(1+z)] and an outlier fraction of ~1.4% for sources with spectroscopic redshifts. We performed blind tests to derive a more realistic estimate of the photo-z quality for sources without spectroscopic redshifts. We expect there are ~9% outliers for the relatively brighter sources (R<26), and the outlier fraction will increase to ~15-25% for the fainter sources (R>26). The typical photo-z accuracy is ~6-7%. The outlier fraction and photo-z accuracy do not appear to have a redshift dependence (for z~0-4). These photo-z's appear to be the best obtained so far for faint X-ray sources, and they have been significantly (>50%) improved compared to previous estimates of the photo-z's for the X-ray sources in the ~2 Ms Chandra Deep Field-North and ~1 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South.
  • We investigate the correlation between far-infrared (FIR) and radio luminosities in distant galaxies, a lynchpin of modern astronomy. We use data from the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimetre Telescope (BLAST), Spitzer, the Large Apex BOlometer CamerA (LABOCA), the Very Large Array (VLA) and the Giant Metre-wave Radio Telescope (GMRT) in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS). For a catalogue of BLAST 250-micron-selected galaxies, we re-measure the 70--870-micron flux densities at the positions of their most likely 24-micron counterparts, which have a median [interquartile] redshift of 0.74 [0.25, 1.57]. From these, we determine the monochromatic flux density ratio, q_250 = log_10 (S_250micron / S_1400MHz), and the bolometric equivalent, q_IR. At z ~= 0.6, where our 250-micron filter probes rest-frame 160-micron emission, we find no evolution relative to q_160 for local galaxies. We also stack the FIR and submm images at the positions of 24-micron- and radio-selected galaxies. The difference between q_IR seen for 250-micron- and radio-selected galaxies suggests star formation provides most of the IR luminosity in ~< 100-uJy radio galaxies, but rather less for those in the mJy regime. For the 24-micron sample, the radio spectral index is constant across 0 < z < 3, but q_IR exhibits tentative evidence of a steady decline such that q_IR is proportional to (1+z)^(-0.15 +/- 0.03) - significant evolution, spanning the epoch of galaxy formation, with major implications for techniques that rely on the FIR/radio correlation. We compare with model predictions and speculate that we may be seeing the increase in radio activity that gives rise to the radio background.
  • Powering the 10^62 erg nuclear outburst in the MS0735.6+7421 cluster central galaxy by accretion implies that its supermassive black hole (SMBH) grew by ~6x10^8 solar masses over the past 100 Myr. We place upper limits on the amount of cold gas and star formation near the nucleus of <10^9 solar masses and <2 solar masses per year, respectively. These limits imply that an implausibly large fraction of the preexisting cold gas in the bulge must have been consumed by its SMBH at the rate of ~3-5 solar masses per year while leaving no trace of star formation. Such a high accretion rate would be difficult to maintain by stellar accretion or the Bondi mechanism, unless the black hole mass approaches 10^11 solar masses. Its feeble nuclear luminosities in the UV, I, and X-ray bands compared to its enormous mechanical power are inconsistent with rapid accretion onto a ~5x10^9 solar mass black hole. We suggest instead that the AGN outburst is powered by a rapidly-spinning black hole. A maximally-spinning, 10^9 solar mass black hole contains enough rotational energy, ~10^62 erg, to quench a cooling flow over its lifetime and to contribute significantly to the excess entropy found in the hot atmospheres of groups and clusters. Two modes of AGN feedback may be quenching star formation in elliptical galaxies centered in cooling halos at late times. An accretion mode that operates in gas-rich systems, and a spin mode operating at modest accretion rates. The spin conjecture may be avoided in MS0735 by appealing to Bondi accretion onto a central black hole whose mass greatly exceeds 10^10 solar mass. The host galaxy's unusually large, 3.8 kpc stellar core radius (light deficit) may witness the presence of an ultramassive black hole.