• Faint star-forming galaxies at $z\sim 2-3$ can be used as alternative background sources to probe the Lyman-$\alpha$ forest in addition to quasars, yielding high sightline densities that enable 3D tomographic reconstruction of the foreground absorption field. Here, we present the first data release from the COSMOS Lyman-Alpha Mapping And Mapping Observations (CLAMATO) Survey, which was conducted with the LRIS spectrograph on the Keck-I telescope. Over an observational footprint of 0.157$\mathrm{deg}^2$ within the COSMOS field, we used 240 galaxies and quasars at $2.17<z<3.00$, with a mean comoving transverse separation of $2.37\,h^{-1}\,\mathrm{Mpc^3}$, as background sources probing the foreground Lyman-$\alpha$ forest absorption at $2.05<z<2.55$. The Lyman-$\alpha$ forest data was then used to create a Wiener-filtered tomographic reconstruction over a comoving volume of $3.15\,\times 10^5\,h^{-3}\,\mathrm{Mpc^3}$ with an effective smoothing scale of $2.5\,h^{-1}\,\mathrm{Mpc}$. In addition to traditional figures, this map is also presented as a virtual-reality YouTube360 video visualization and manipulable interactive figure. We see large overdensities and underdensities that visually agree with the distribution of coeval galaxies from spectroscopic redshift surveys in the same field, including overdensities associated with several recently-discovered galaxy protoclusters in the volume. This data release includes the redshift catalog, reduced spectra, extracted Lyman-$\alpha$ forest pixel data, and tomographic map of the absorption.
  • The ULIRG Mrk 273 contains two infrared nuclei, N and SW, separated by 1 arcsec. A Chandra observation has identified the SW nucleus as an absorbed X-ray source with nH ~4e23 cm-2 but also hinted at the possible presence of a Compton thick AGN in the N nucleus, where a black hole of 10^9 Msun is inferred from the ionized gas kinematics. The intrinsic X-ray spectral slope recently measured by NuSTAR is unusually hard (photon index of ~1.3) for a Seyfert nucleus, for which we seek an alternative explanation. We hypothesise a strongly absorbed X-ray source in N, of which X-ray emission rises steeply above 10 keV, in addition to the known X-ray source in SW, and test it against the NuSTAR data, assuming the standard spectral slope (photon index of 1.9). This double X-ray source model gives a good explanation of the hard continuum spectrum, the deep Fe K absorption edge, and the strong Fe K line observed in this ULIRG, without invoking the unusual spectral slope required for a single source interpretation. The putative X-ray source in N is found to be absorbed by nH = 1.4(+0.7/-0.4)e24 cm-2. The estimated 2-10 keV luminosity of the N source is 1.3e43 erg/s, about a factor of 2 larger than that of SW during the NuSTAR observation. Uncorrelated variability above and below 10 keV between the Suzaku and NuSTAR observations appears to support the double source interpretation. Variability in spectral hardness and Fe K line flux between the previous X-ray observations is also consistent with this picture.
  • Numerical simulations of cosmological structure formation show that the Universe's most massive clusters, and the galaxies living in those clusters, assemble rapidly at early times (2.5 < z < 4). While more than twenty proto-clusters have been observed at z > 2 based on associations of 5-40 galaxies around rare sources, the observational evidence for rapid cluster formation is weak. Here we report observations of an asymmetric, filamentary structure at z = 2.47 containing seven starbursting, submillimeter-luminous galaxies and five additional AGN within a comoving volume of 15000 Mpc$^{3}$. As the expected lifetime of both the luminous AGN and starburst phase of a galaxy is ~100 Myr, we conclude that these sources were likely triggered in rapid succession by environmental factors, or, alternatively, the duration of these cosmologically rare phenomena is much longer than prior direct measurements suggest. The stellar mass already built up in the structure is $\sim10^{12}M_{\odot}$ and we estimate that the cluster mass will exceed that of the Coma supercluster at $z \sim 0$. The filamentary structure is in line with hierarchical growth simulations which predict that the peak of cluster activity occurs rapidly at z > 2.
  • The relation between the stellar mass and the star formation rate characterizes how the instantaneous star formation is determined by the galaxy past star formation history and by the growth of the dark matter structures. We deconstruct the M-SFR plane by measuring the specific SFR functions in several stellar mass bins from z=0.2 out to z=1.4. Our analysis is primary based on a MIPS 24$\mu m$ selected catalogue combining the COSMOS and GOODS surveys. We estimate the SFR by combining mid- and far-infrared data for 20500 galaxies. The sSFR functions are derived in four stellar mass bins within the range 9.5<log(M/Msun)<11.5. First, we demonstrate the importance of taking into account selection effects when studying the M-SFR relation. Secondly, we find a mass-dependent evolution of the median sSFR with redshift varying as $sSFR \propto (1+z)^{b}$, with $b$ increasing from $b=2.88$ to $b=3.78$ between $M=10^{9.75}Msun$ and $M=10^{11.1}Msun$, respectively. At low masses, this evolution is consistent with the cosmological accretion rate and predictions from semi-analytical models (SAM). This agreement breaks down for more massive galaxies showing the need for a more comprehensive description of the star-formation history in massive galaxies. Third, we obtain that the shape of the sSFR function is invariant with time at z<1.4 but depends on the mass. We observe a broadening of the sSFR function ranging from 0.28 dex at $M=10^{9.75}Msun$ to 0.46 dex at $M=10^{11.1}Msun$. Such increase in the scatter of the M-SFR relation suggests an increasing diversity of SFHs as the stellar mass increases. Finally, we find a gradual decline of the sSFR with mass as $log(sSFR) \propto -0.17M$. We discuss the numerous physical processes, as gas exhaustion in hot gas halos or secular evolution, which can gradually reduce the sSFR and increase the SFH diversity.
  • We investigate the relationships between stellar mass, gas-phase oxygen abundance (metallicity), star formation rate, and dust content of star-forming galaxies at z$\sim$1.6 using Subaru/FMOS spectroscopy in the COSMOS field. The mass-metallicity relation at $z\sim1.6$ is steeper than the relation observed in the local Universe. The steeper MZ relation at $z\sim1.6$ is mainly due to evolution in the stellar mass where the MZ relation begins to turnover and flatten. This turnover mass is 1.2 dex larger at $z\sim1.6$. The most massive galaxies at $z\sim1.6$ ($\sim 10^{11}M_\odot$) are enriched to the level observed in massive galaxies in the local Universe. The mass-metallicity relation we measure at $z\sim1.6$ supports the suggestion of an empirical upper metallicity limit that does not significantly evolve with redshift. We find an anti-correlation between metallicity and star formation rate for galaxies at a fixed stellar mass at $z\sim1.6$ which is similar to trends observed in the local Universe. We do not find a relation between stellar mass, metallicity and star formation rate that is independent of redshift; our data suggest that there is redshift evolution in this relation. We examine the relation between stellar mass, metallicity and dust extinction. We find that at a fixed stellar mass dustier galaxies tend to be more metal rich. From examination of the stellar masses, metallicities, SFRs and dust extinctions we conclude that stellar mass is most closely related to dust extinction.
  • We use the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope's SCUBA-2 camera to image a 400 arcmin^2 area surrounding the GOODS-N field. The 850 micron rms noise ranges from a value of 0.49 mJy in the central region to 3.5 mJy at the outside edge. From these data, we construct an 850 micron source catalog to 2 mJy containing 49 sources detected above the 4-sigma level. We use an ultradeep (11.5 uJy at 5-sigma) 1.4 GHz image obtained with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array together with observations made with the Submillimeter Array to identify counterparts to the submillimeter galaxies. For most cases of multiple radio counterparts, we can identify the correct counterpart from new and existing Submillimeter Array data. We have spectroscopic redshifts for 62% of the radio sources in the 9 arcmin radius highest sensitivity region (556/894) and 67% of the radio sources in the GOODS-N region (367/543). We supplement these with a modest number of additional photometric redshifts in the GOODS-N region (30). We measure millimetric redshifts from the radio to submillimeter flux ratios for the unidentified submillimeter sample, assuming an Arp 220 spectral energy distribution. We find a radio flux dependent K-z relation for the radio sources, which we use to estimate redshifts for the remaining radio sources. We determine the star formation rates (SFRs) of the submillimeter sources based on their radio powers and their submillimeter and find that they agree well. The radio data are deep enough to detect star-forming galaxies with SFRs >2000 solar masses per year to z~6. We find galaxies with SFRs up to ~6,000 solar masses per year over the redshift range z=1.5-6, but we see evidence for a turn-down in the SFR distribution function above 2000 solar masses per year.
  • Nuclear stellar cusps are defined as central excess light component in the stellar light profiles of galaxies and are suggested to be stellar relics of intense compact starbursts in the central ~100-500 pc region of gas-rich major mergers. Here we probe the build-up of nuclear cusps during the actual starburst phase for a complete sample of Luminous Infrared Galaxy systems (85 LIRGs, with 11.4<log[LIR/L_sun]<12.5) in the GOALS sample. Cusp properties are derived via 2-dimensional fitting of the nuclear stellar light imaged in the near-infrared by the Hubble Space Telescope and have been combined with mid-IR diagnostics for AGN/starburst characterization. We find that nuclear stellar cusps are resolved in 76% of LIRGs (merger and non-interacting galaxies). The cusp strength and luminosity increases with far-IR luminosity (excluding AGN) and merger stage, confirming theoretical models that starburst activity is associated with the build-up of nuclear stellar cusps. Evidence for ultra compact nuclear starbursts is found in ~13% of LIRGs, which have a strong unresolved central NIR light component but no significant contribution of an AGN. The nuclear near-IR surface density (measured within 1 kpc radius) increases by a factor of ~5 towards late merger stages. A careful comparison to local early-type galaxies with comparable masses reveals (a) that local (U)LIRGs have a significantly larger cusp fraction and (b) that the majority of the cusp LIRGs have host galaxy luminosities (H-band) similar to core ellipticals which is roughly one order in magnitude larger than for cusp ellipticals.
  • With this paper, we release accurate photometric redshifts for 1692 counterparts to Chandra sources in the central square degree of the COSMOS field. The availability of a large training set of spectroscopic redshifts that extends to faint magnitudes enabled photometric redshifts comparable to the highest quality results presently available for normal galaxies. We demonstrate that morphologically extended, faint X-ray sources without optical variability are more accurately described by a library of normal galaxies (corrected for emission lines) than by AGN-dominated templates, even if these sources have AGN-like X-ray luminosities. Preselecting the library on the bases of the source properties allowed us to reach an accuracy sigma_(Delta z/(1+z_spec)) \sim0.015 with a fraction of outliers of 5.8% for the entire Chandra-COSMOS sample. In addition, we release revised photometric redshifts for the 1735 optical counterparts of the XMM-detected sources over the entire 2 sq. deg.of COSMOS. For 248 sources, our updated photometric redshift differs from the previous release by Delta z>0.2. These changes are predominantly due to the inclusion of newly available deep H-band photometry H_AB=24 mag. We illustrate once again the importance of a spectroscopic training sample and how an assumption about the nature of a source together with the number and the depth of the available bands influence the accuracy of the photometric redshifts determined for AGN. These considerations should be kept in mind when defining the observational strategies of upcoming large surveys targeting AGN, such as eROSITA at X-ray energies and ASKAP/EMU in the radio band.
  • We present X-ray data for a complete sample of 44 luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs), obtained with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. These are the X-ray observations of the high luminosity portion of the Great Observatory All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS), which includes the most luminous infrared selected galaxies, log (Lir/Lsun) > 11.73, in the local universe, z < 0.088. X-rays were detected from 43 out of 44 objects, and their arcsec-resolution images, spectra, and radial brightness distributions are presented. With a selection by hard X-ray colour and the 6.4 keV iron line, AGN are found in 37% of the objects, with higher luminosity sources more likely to contain an AGN. These AGN also tend to be found in late-stage mergers. The AGN fraction would increase to 48% if objects with mid-IR [Ne V] detection are included. Double AGN are clearly detected only in NGC 6240 among 24 double/triple systems. Other AGN are found either in single nucleus objects or in one of the double nuclei at similar rates. Objects without conventional X-ray signatures of AGN appear to be hard X-ray quiet, relative to the X-ray to far-IR correlation for starburst galaxies, as discussed elsewhere. Most objects also show extended soft X-ray emission, which is likely related to an outflow from the nuclear region, with a metal abundance pattern suggesting enrichment by core collapse supernovae, as expected for a starburst.
  • We present three bright z+ dropout candidates selected from deep Near-Infrared (NIR) imaging of the COSMOS 2 square degree field. All three objects match the 0.8-8um colors of other published z>7 candidates but are three magnitudes brighter, facilitating further study. Deep spectroscopy of two of the candidates covering 0.64-1.02um with Keck-DEIMOS and all three covering 0.94-1.10um and 1.52-1.80um with Keck-NIRSPEC detects weak spectral features tentatively identified as Ly-alpha at z=6.95 and z=7.69 in two of the objects. The third object is placed at z~1.6 based on a 24um and weak optical detection. A comparison with the spectral energy distributions of known z<7 galaxies, including objects with strong spectral lines, large extinction, and large systematic uncertainties in the photometry yields no objects with similar colors. However, the lambda>1um properties of all three objects can be matched to optically detected sources with photometric redshifts at z~1.8, so the non-detection in the i+ and z+ bands are the primary factors which favors a z>7 solution. If any of these objects are at z~7 the bright end of the luminosity function is significantly higher at z>7 than suggested by previous studies, but consistent within the statistical uncertainty and the dark matter halo distribution. If these objects are at low redshift, the Lyman-Break selection must be contaminated by a previously unknown population of low redshift objects with very strong breaks in their broad band spectral energy distributions and blue NIR colors. The implications of this result on luminosity function evolution at high redshift is discussed. We show that the primary limitation of z>7 galaxy searches with broad filters is the depth of the available optical data.
  • Analysis of data from the Chandra X-ray Observatory for the double nucleus ULIRG Mrk 273 reveals an absorbed hard X-ray source coincident with the southwest nucleus, implying that this unresolved near infrared source is where an active nucleus resides while the northern nuclear region contains a powerful starburst which dominates the far infrared luminosity. There is evidence of a slight image extension in the 6-7 keV band, where a Fe K line is present, towards the northern nucleus. A large-scale, diffuse emission nebula detected in soft X-rays contains a dark lane that spatially coincides with a high surface-brightness tidal tail extending ~50 arcsec (40 kpc) to the south. The soft X-ray source is likely located behind the tidal tail which absorbs X-ray photons along the line of sight. The estimated column density of cold gas in the tidal tail responsible for shadowing the soft X-rays is nH >= 6e+21 cm-2, consistent with the tidal tail having an edge-on orientation.
  • We present results of Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS H-band imaging of 73 of most luminous (i.e., log[L_IR/L_0]>11.4) Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs) in the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). This dataset combines multi-wavelength imaging and spectroscopic data from space (Spitzer, HST, GALEX, and Chandra) and ground-based telescopes. In this paper we use the high-resolution near-infrared data to recover nuclear structure that is obscured by dust at optical wavelengths and measure the evolution in this structure along the merger sequence. A large fraction of all galaxies in our sample possess double nuclei (~63%) or show evidence for triple nuclei (~6%). Half of these double nuclei are not visible in the HST B-band images due to dust obscuration. The majority of interacting LIRGs have remaining merger timescales of 0.3 to 1.3 Gyrs, based on the projected nuclear separations and the mass ratio of nuclei. We find that the bulge luminosity surface density increases significantly along the merger sequence (primarily due to a decrease of the bulge radius), while the bulge luminosity shows a small increase towards late merger stages. No significant increase of the bulge Sersic index is found. LIRGs that show no interaction features have on average a significantly larger bulge luminosity, suggesting that non merging LIRGs have larger bulge masses than merging LIRGs. This may be related to the flux limited nature of the sample and the fact that mergers can significantly boost the IR luminosity of otherwise low luminosity galaxies. We find that the projected nuclear separation is significantly smaller for ULIRGs (median value of 1.2 kpc) than for LIRGs (mean value of 6.7 kpc), suggesting that the LIRG phase appears earlier in mergers than the ULIRG phase.
  • We present a full high resolution SPIRE FTS spectrum of the nearby ultraluminous infrared galaxy Mrk231. In total 25 lines are detected, including CO J=5-4 through J=13-12, 7 rotational lines of H2O, 3 of OH+ and one line each of H2O+, CH+, and HF. We find that the excitation of the CO rotational levels up to J=8 can be accounted for by UV radiation from star formation. However, the approximately flat luminosity distribution of the CO lines over the rotational ladder above J=8 requires the presence of a separate source of excitation for the highest CO lines. We explore X-ray heating by the accreting supermassive black hole in Mrk231 as a source of excitation for these lines, and find that it can reproduce the observed luminosities. We also consider a model with dense gas in a strong UV radiation field to produce the highest CO lines, but find that this model strongly overpredicts the hot dust mass in Mrk231. Our favoured model consists of a star forming disk of radius 560 pc, containing clumps of dense gas exposed to strong UV radiation, dominating the emission of CO lines up to J=8. X-rays from the accreting supermassive black hole in Mrk231 dominate the excitation and chemistry of the inner disk out to a radius of 160 pc, consistent with the X-ray power of the AGN in Mrk231. The extraordinary luminosity of the OH+ and H2O+ lines reveals the signature of X-ray driven excitation and chemistry in this region.
  • An analysis of data from the Spitzer Space Telescope, Hubble Space Telescope, Chandra X-ray Observatory, and AKARI Infrared Astronomy Satellite is presented for the z=0.036 merging galaxy system II Zw 096 (CGCG 448-020). Because II Zw 096 has an infrared luminosity of log(L_IR/L_sun) = 11.94, it is classified as a Luminous Infrared Galaxy (LIRG), and was observed as part of the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). The Spitzer data suggest that 80% of the total infrared luminosity comes from an extremely compact, red source not associated with the nuclei of the merging galaxies. The Spitzer mid-infrared spectra indicate no high-ionization lines from a buried active galactic nucleus in this source. The strong detection of the 3.3 micron and 6.2 micron PAH emission features in the AKARI and Spitzer spectra also implies that the energy source of II Zw 096 is a starburst. Based on Spitzer infrared imaging and AKARI near-infrared spectroscopy, the star formation rate is estimated to be 120 M_sun/yr and > 45 M_sun/yr, respectively. Finally, the high-resolution B, I, and H-band images show many star clusters in the interacting system. The colors of these clusters suggest at least two populations - one with an age of 1-5 Myr and one with an age of 20-500 Myr, reddened by 0-2 magnitudes of visual extinction. The masses of these clusters span a range between 10^6-10^8 M_sun. This starburst source is reminiscent of the extra-nuclear starburst seen in NGC 4038/9 (the Antennae Galaxies) and Arp 299 but approximately an order of magnitude more luminous than the Antennae. The source is remarkable in that the off-nuclear infrared luminosity dominates the enitre system.
  • (abridged) We present a new near-infrared survey covering the 2 deg sq COSMOS field. Combining our survey with Subaru B and z images we construct a deep, wide-field optical-infrared catalogue. At Ks<23 (AB magnitudes) our survey completeness is greater than 90% and 70% for stars and galaxies respectively and contains 143,466 galaxies and 13,254 stars. At z~2 our catalogues contain 3931 quiescent and 25,757 star-forming BzK-selected galaxies representing the largest and most secure sample of these objects to date. Our counts of quiescent galaxies turns over at Ks~22 an effect which we demonstrate cannot be due to sample incompleteness. In our survey both the number of faint and bright quiescent objects exceeds the predictions of a semi-analytic galaxy formation model, indicating potentially the need for further refinements in the amount of merging and AGN feedback at z~2 in these models. We measure the angular correlation function for each sample and find that at small scales the correlation function for passive BzK galaxies exceeds the clustering of dark matter. We use 30-band photometric redshifts to derive the spatial correlation length and the redshift distributions for each object class. At Ks<22 we find r_0^{\gamma/1.8}=7.0 +/-0.5h^{-1} Mpc for the passive BzK candidates and 4.7+/-0.8h^{-1} Mpc for the star-forming BzK galaxies. Our pBzK galaxies have an average photometric redshift of z_p~1.4, in approximate agreement with the limited spectroscopic information currently available. The stacked Ks image will be made publicly available from IRSA.
  • The Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) combines data from NASA's Spitzer, Chandra, Hubble and GALEX observatories, together with ground-based data into a comprehensive imaging and spectroscopic survey of over 200 low redshift Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs). The LIRGs are a complete subset of the IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample (RBGS). The LIRGs targeted in GOALS span the full range of nuclear spectral types defined via traditional optical line-ratio diagrams as well as interaction stages. They provide an unbiased picture of the processes responsible for enhanced infrared emission in galaxies in the local Universe. As an example of the analytic power of the multi-wavelength GOALS dataset, we present data for the interacting system VV 340 (IRAS F14547+2449). Between 80-95% of the total far-infrared emission (or about 5E11 solar luminosities) originates in VV 340 North. While the IRAC colors of VV 340 North and South are consistent with star-forming galaxies, both the Spitzer IRS and Chandra ACIS data indicate the presence of a buried AGN in VV 340 North. The GALEX far and near-UV fluxes imply a extremely large infrared "excess" (IRX) for the system (IR/FUV = 81) which is well above the correlation seen in starburst galaxies. Most of this excess is driven by VV 340 N, which alone has an IR excess of nearly 400. The VV 340 system seems to be comprised of two very different galaxies - an infrared luminous edge-on galaxy (VV 340 North) that dominates the long-wavelength emission from the system and which hosts a buried AGN, and a face-on starburst (VV 340 South) that dominates the short-wavelength emission.
  • We report on a short XMM-Newton observation of the gravitationally-lensed, luminous infrared galaxy IRAS F10214+4724 at z=2.3. A faint X-ray source is detected at 4 sigma. The observed 0.5-2 keV (1.7-6.6 keV in the rest-frame) flux is 1.3e-15 erg/s/cm2 and the spectral slope in the rest-frame 1-10 keV band is Gamma~2. These results agree with those obtained from the Chandra X-ray Observatory, given the large uncertainties in both measurements. While possible evidence for excess emission above 5 keV is seen, we suspect this excess might be either spurious or not related to the infrared galaxy.
  • The Chandra COSMOS Survey (C-COSMOS) is a large, 1.8 Ms, Chandra} program that has imaged the central 0.5 sq.deg of the COSMOS field (centered at 10h, +02deg) with an effective exposure of ~160ksec, and an outer 0.4sq.deg. area with an effective exposure of ~80ksec. The limiting source detection depths are 1.9e-16 erg cm(-2) s(-1) in the Soft (0.5-2 keV) band, 7.3e(-16) erg cm^-2 s^-1 in the Hard (2-10 keV) band, and 5.7e(-16) erg cm(-2) s(-1) in the Full (0.5-10 keV) band. Here we describe the strategy, design and execution of the C-COSMOS survey, and present the catalog of 1761 point sources detected at a probability of being spurious of <2e(-5) (1655 in the Full, 1340 in the Soft, and 1017 in the Hard bands). By using a grid of 36 heavily (~50%) overlapping pointing positions with the ACIS-I imager, a remarkably uniform (to 12%) exposure across the inner 0.5 sq.deg field was obtained, leading to a sharply defined lower flux limit. The widely different PSFs obtained in each exposure at each point in the field required a novel source detection method, because of the overlapping tiling strategy, which is described in a companion paper. (Puccetti et al. Paper II). This method produced reliable sources down to a 7-12 counts, as verified by the resulting logN-logS curve, with sub-arcsecond positions, enabling optical and infrared identifications of virtually all sources, as reported in a second companion paper (Civano et al. Paper III). The full catalog is described here in detail, and is available on-line.
  • We quantify the effects of \emph{morphological k-correction} at $1<z<2$ by comparing morphologies measured in the K and I-bands in the COSMOS area. Ks-band data have indeed the advantage of probing old stellar populations for $z<2$, enabling a determination of galaxy morphological types unaffected by recent star formation. In paper I we presented a new non-parametric method to quantify morphologies of galaxies on seeing limited images based on support vector machines. Here we use this method to classify $\sim$$50 000$ $Ks$ selected galaxies in the COSMOS area observed with WIRCam at CFHT. The obtained classification is used to investigate the redshift distributions and number counts per morphological type up to $z\sim2$ and to compare to the results obtained with HST/ACS in the I-band on the same objects from other works. We associate to every galaxy with $Ks<21.5$ and $z<2$ a probability between 0 and 1 of being late-type or early-type. The classification is found to be reliable up to $z\sim2$. The mean probability is $p\sim0.8$. It decreases with redshift and with size, especially for the early-type population but remains above $p\sim0.7$. The classification is globally in good agreement with the one obtained using HST/ACS for $z<1$. Above $z\sim1$, the I-band classification tends to find less early-type galaxies than the Ks-band one by a factor $\sim$1.5 which might be a consequence of morphological k-correction effects. We argue therefore that studies based on I-band HST/ACS classifications at $z>1$ could be underestimating the elliptical population. [abridged]
  • We report an over-density of bright sub-millimetre galaxies (SMGs) in the 0.15 sq. deg. AzTEC/COSMOS survey and a spatial correlation between the SMGs and the optical-IR galaxy density at z <~ 1.1. This portion of the COSMOS field shows a ~ 3-sigma over-density of robust SMG detections when compared to a background, or "blankfield", population model that is consistent with SMG surveys of fields with no extragalactic bias. The SMG over-density is most significant in the number of very bright detections (14 sources with measured fluxes S(1.1mm) > 6 mJy), which is entirely incompatible with sample variance within our adopted blank-field number densities and infers an over-density significance of >> 4. We find that the over-density and spatial correlation to optical-IR galaxy density are most consistent with lensing of a background SMG population by foreground mass structures along the line of sight, rather than physical association of the SMGs with the z <~ 1.1 galaxies/clusters. The SMG positions are only weakly correlated with weak-lensing maps, suggesting that the dominant sources of correlation are individual galaxies and the more tenuous structures in the region and not the massive and compact clusters. These results highlight the important roles cosmic variance and large-scale structure can play in the study of SMGs.
  • We report the results from our analysis of {\it Suzaku} XIS (0.5-10 keV) and HXD/PIN (15-40 keV) observations of five well-known local ULIRGs: {\em IRAS} F05189-2524, {\em IRAS} F08572+3915, Mrk 273, PKS 1345+12, and Arp 220. The XIS observations of F05189-2524 and Mrk 273 reveal strong iron lines consistent with Fe K$\alpha$ and changes in spectral shapes with respect to previous {\it Chandra} and {\it XMM-Newton} observations. Mrk 273 is also detected by the HXD/PIN at $\sim$1.8-$\sigma$. For F05189-2524, modeling of the data from the different epochs suggests that the change in spectral shape is likely due to the central source switching off, leaving behind a residual reflection spectrum, or an increase in the absorbing column. An increase in the covering fraction of the absorber can describe the spectral variations seen in Mrk 273, although a reduction in the intrinsic AGN luminosity cannot be formally ruled out. The {\it Suzaku} spectra of Mrk 273 are well fit by a ~94% covering fraction model with a column density of $\sim10^{24}$ cm$^{-2}$. The absorption-corrected log[$L_{\rm 2-10 keV}$ / $L_{\rm IR}$] ratio is consistent with those found in PG Quasars. The 0.5-10 keV spectrum of PKS 1345+12 and Arp 220 seem unchanged from previous observations and their hard X-ray emission is not convincingly detected by the HXD/PIN. The large column density derived from CO observations and the large equivalent width of an ionized Fe line in Arp 220 can be reconciled by an ionized reflection model. F08572+3915 is undetected in both the XIS and HXD/PIN, but the analysis of unpublished {\em Chandra} data provides a new measurement at low energies.
  • (abridged) We take advantage of the deep Chandra and Spitzer coverage of a large area (more than 10 times the area covered by the Chandra deep fields, CDFs in the COSMOS field, to extend the search of highly obscured, Compton-thick active nuclei to higher luminosity. These sources have low surface density and large samples can be provided only through large area surveys, like the COSMOS survey. We analyze the X-ray properties of COSMOS MIPS sources with 24$\mu$m fluxes higher than 550$\mu$Jy. For the MIPS sources not directly detected in the Chandra images we produce stacked images in soft and hard X-rays bands. To estimate the fraction of Compton-thick AGN in the MIPS source population we compare the observed stacked count rates and hardness ratios to those predicted by detailed Monte Carlo simulations including both obscured AGN and star-forming galaxies. The density of lower luminosity Compton-thick AGN (logL(2-10keV)=43.5-44) at z=0.7--1.2 is $(3.7\pm1.1) \times10^{-5}$ Mpc$^{-3}$, corresponding to $\sim67%$ of that of X-ray selected AGN. The comparison between the fraction of infrared selected, Compton thick AGN to the X-ray selected, unobscured and moderately obscured AGN at high and low luminosity suggests that Compton-thick AGN follow a luminosity dependence similar to that discovered for Compton-thin AGN, becoming relatively rarer at high luminosities. We estimate that the fraction of AGN (unobscured, moderately obscured and Compton thick) to the total MIPS source population is $49\pm10%$, a value significantly higher than that previously estimated at similar 24$\mu$m fluxes. We discuss how our findings can constrain AGN feedback models.
  • We present photometric redshifts and spectral energy distribution (SED) classifications for a sample of 1542 optically identified sources detected with XMM in the COSMOS field. Our template fitting classifies 46 sources as stars and 464 as non-active galaxies, while the remaining 1032 require templates with an AGN contribution. High accuracy in the derived photometric redshifts was accomplished as the result of 1) photometry in up to 30 bands with high significance detections, 2) a new set of SED templates including 18 hybrids covering the far-UV to mid-infrared, which have been constructed by the combination of AGN and non-active galaxies templates, and 3) multi-epoch observations that have been used to correct for variability (most important for type 1 AGN). The reliability of the photometric redshifts is evaluated using the sub-sample of 442 sources with measured spectroscopic redshifts. We achieved an accuracy of $\sigma_{\Delta z/(1+z_{spec})} = 0.014$ for i$_{AB}^*<$22.5 ($\sigma_{\Delta z/(1+z_{spec})} \sim0.015$ for i$_{AB}^*<$24.5). The high accuracies were accomplished for both type 2 (where the SED is often dominated by the host galaxy) and type 1 AGN and QSOs out to $z=4.5$. The number of outliers is a large improvement over previous photometric redshift estimates for X-ray selected sources (4.0% and 4.8% outliers for i$_{AB}^*<$22.5 and i$_{AB}^*<$24.5, respectively). We show that the intermediate band photometry is vital to achieving accurate photometric redshifts for AGN, whereas the broad SED coverage provided by mid infrared (Spitzer/IRAC) bands is important to reduce the number of outliers for normal galaxies.
  • We report on the detection of Fe Kalpha emission in F04103$-$2838, an ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG; log[L$_{\rm IR}$/L$_\odot$] $\ge$ 12) that is optically classified as a LINER. Previous {\it Chandra} observations suggested the presence of both a starburst and an AGN in this source. A deeper ($\sim$20 ksec) {\it XMM-Newton} spectrum reveals an Fe Kalpha line at rest frame energy $\sim$6.4 keV, consistent with cold neutral iron. The best-fit spectral model indicates the Fe Kalpha line has an equivalent width of $\sim$1.6 keV. The hard X-ray emission is dominated by a Compton-thick AGN with intrinsic 0.2--10 keV luminosity $\sim10^{44}$ ergs s$^{-1}$, while the soft X-ray emission is from $\sim$0.1 keV gas attributed to the starburst. The X-ray spectrum of this source bears a striking resemblance to that of the archetypal luminous infrared galaxy NGC 6240 despite differences in merger state and infrared properties.
  • We have identified a large-scale structure at z~0.73 in the COSMOS field, coherently described by the distribution of galaxy photometric redshifts, an ACS weak-lensing convergence map and the distribution of extended X-ray sources in a mosaic of XMM observations. The main peak seen in these maps corresponds to a rich cluster with Tx= 3.51+0.60/-0.46 keV and Lx=(1.56+/-0.04) x 10^{44} erg/s ([0.1-2.4] keV band). We estimate an X-ray mass within $r500$ corresponding to M500~1.6 x 10^{14} Msun and a total lensing mass (extrapolated by fitting a NFW profile) M(NFW)=(6+/-3) x 10^15 Msun. We use an automated morphological classification of all galaxies brighter than I_AB=24 over the structure area to measure the fraction of early-type objects as a function of local projected density Sigma_10, based on photometric redshifts derived from ground-based deep multi-band photometry. We recover a robust morphology-density relation at this redshift, indicating, for comparable local densities, a smaller fraction of early-type galaxies than today. Interestingly, this difference is less strong at the highest densities and becomes more severe in intermediate environments. We also find, however, local "inversions'' of the observed global relation, possibly driven by the large-scale environment. In particular, we find direct correspondence of a large concentration of disk galaxies to (the colder side of) a possible shock region detected in the X-ray temperature map and surface brightness distribution of the dominant cluster. We interpret this as potential evidence of shock-induced star formation in existing galaxy disks, during the ongoing merger between two sub-clusters.