• We present the selection and classification of over a thousand ultraviolet (UV) variable sources discovered in ~ 40 deg^2 of GALEX Time Domain Survey (TDS) NUV images observed with a cadence of 2 days and a baseline of observations of ~ 3 years. The GALEX TDS fields were designed to be in spatial and temporal coordination with the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey, which provides deep optical imaging and simultaneous optical transient detections via image differencing. We characterize the GALEX photometric errors empirically as a function of mean magnitude, and select sources that vary at the 5\sigma level in at least one epoch. We measure the statistical properties of the UV variability, including the structure function on timescales of days and years. We report classifications for the GALEX TDS sample using a combination of optical host colors and morphology, UV light curve characteristics, and matches to archival X-ray, and spectroscopy catalogs. We classify 62% of the sources as active galaxies (358 quasars and 305 active galactic nuclei), and 10% as variable stars (including 37 RR Lyrae, 53 M dwarf flare stars, and 2 cataclysmic variables). The remaining unclassified sources include UV-bright extragalactic transients, two of which have been spectroscopically confirmed to be a young core-collapse supernova and a flare from the tidal disruption of a star by dormant supermassive black hole. We calculate a surface density for variable sources in the UV with NUV < 23 mag and |\Delta m| > 0.2 mag of ~ 8.0, 7.7, and 1.8 deg^-2 for quasars, AGNs, and RR Lyrae stars, respectively. We also calculate a surface density rate in the UV for transient sources, using the effective survey time at the cadence appropriate to each class, of ~ 15 and 52 deg^-2 yr^-1 for M dwarfs and extragalactic transients, respectively. (Abridged.)
  • Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) display a range in structures (from single/compact to clumpy/extended) that is different from typical local star-forming galaxies. Recently, we have introduced a sample of rare, nearby (z<0.3) starbursts that appear to be good analogs of LBGs. These "Lyman Break Analogs" (LBAs) provide an excellent training set for understanding starbursts at different redshifts. We present an application of this by comparing the rest-frame UV/optical morphologies of 30 LBAs with those of sBzK galaxies at z~2, and LBGs at z~3-4 in the HUDF. The UV/optical colors and sizes of LBAs and LBGs are very similar, while the BzK galaxies are somewhat redder and larger. There is significant overlap between the morphologies (G, C, A and M_20) of the local and high-z samples, although the latter are somewhat less concentrated and clumpier. We find that in the majority of LBAs the starbursts appear to be triggered by interactions/mergers. When the images of the LBAs are degraded to the same sensitivity and resolution as the images of LBGs and BzK galaxies, these relatively faint asymmetric features are no longer detectable. This effect is particularly severe in the rest-frame UV. It has been suggested that high-z galaxies experience intense bursts unlike anything seen locally, possibly due to cold flows and instabilities. In part, this is based on the fact that the majority (~70%) of LBGs do not show morphological signatures of mergers. Our results suggest that this evidence is insufficient, since a large fraction of such signatures would likely have been missed in current observations of z>2 galaxies. This leaves open the possibility that clumpy accretion and mergers remain important in driving the evolution of these starbursts, together with rapid gas accretion through other means.
  • We present HST UV/optical imaging, Spitzer mid-IR photometry, and optical spectroscopy of a sample of 30 low-redshift (z=0.1-0.3) galaxies chosen from SDSS/GALEX to be accurate local analogs of the high-z Lyman Break Galaxies. The Lyman Break Analogs (LBAs) are similar in mass, metallicity, dust, SFR, size and gas velocity dispersion, thus enabling a detailed investigation of processes that are important at high-z. The optical emission line properties of LBAs are also similar to those of LBGs, indicating comparable conditions in their ISM. In the UV, LBAs are characterized by complexes of massive star-forming "clumps", while in the optical they most often show evidence for (post-)mergers/interactions. In 6 cases, we find an extremely massive (>10^9 Msun) compact (R~100 pc) dominant central object (DCO). The DCOs are preferentially found in LBAs with the highest mid-IR luminosities and correspondingly high SFRs (15-100 Msun/yr). We show that the massive SF clumps (including the DCOs) have masses much larger than the nuclear super star clusters seen in normal late type galaxies. However, the DCOs have masses, sizes, and densities similar to the excess-light/central-cusps seen in typical elliptical galaxies with masses similar to the LBA galaxies. We suggest that the DCOs form in present-day examples of the dissipative mergers at high redshift that are believed to have produced the central-cusps in local ellipticals. More generally, the properties of the LBAs are consistent with the idea that instabilities in a gas-rich disk lead to very massive star-forming clumps that eventually coalesce to form a spheroid. We speculate that the DCOs are too young at present to be growing a supermassive black hole because they are still in a supernova-dominated outflow phase.
  • We intend to show that it is possible to derive the physical parameters of galaxies from their broad-band spectral energy distribution out to a redshift of 1.2. This method has the potential to yield the physical parameters of all galaxies in a single field in a homogeneous way. We use an extensive dataset, assembled in the context of the VVDS survey, which reaches from the UV to the IR and covers a sample of 84073 galaxies over an area of 0.89 deg$^2$. We also use a library of 100000 model galaxies with a large variety of star formation histories (in particular including late bursts of star formation). We find that we can determine the physical parameters stellar mass, age and star formation rate with good confidence. We validate the star formation rate determinations in particular by comparing it to a sample of spectroscopically observed galaxies with an emission line measurement. We use our sample to build the number density function of galaxies as a function of stellar mass, specific star formation rate and redshift. We then study whether the stellar mass function at a later time can be predicted from the stellar mass function and star formation rate distribution at an earlier time. We find that the predicted growth in stellar mass from star formation agrees with the observed one. However, the predicted stellar mass density for massive galaxies is lower than observed, while the mass density of intermediate mass galaxies is overpredicted. When comparing with a direct measurement of the major merger rate from the VVDS survey we find that major mergers are sufficient to explain about a third of the mass build-up at the massive end, while the rest is likely contributed through minor mergers.
  • We study the ultraviolet to far-infrared (hereafter UV-to-IR) SEDs of a sample of intermediate redshift (0.2 < z < 0.7) UV-selected galaxies from the ELAIS-N1 and ELAIS-N2 fields by fitting a multi-wavelength dataset to a library of GRASIL templates. Star formation related properties of the galaxies are derived from the library of models by using the Bayesian statistics. We find a decreasing presence of galaxies with low attenuation and low total luminosity as redshift decreases, which does not hold for high total luminosity galaxies. In addition the dust attenuation of low mass galaxies increases as redshift decreases, and this trend seems to disappear for galaxies with M* > 10^11 M_sun. This result is consistent with a mass dependent evolution of the dust to gas ratio, which could be driven by a mass dependent efficiency of star formation in star forming galaxies. The specific star formation rates (SSFR) decrease with increasing stellar mass at all redshifts, and for a given stellar mass the SSFR decreases with decreasing redshift. The differences in the slope of the M*--SSFR relation found between this work and others at similar redshift could be explained by the adopted selection criteria of the samples which, for a UV selected sample, favours blue, star forming galaxies.
  • This work presents the main ultraviolet (UV) and far-infrared (FIR) properties of two samples of nearby galaxies selected from the GALEX ($\lambda = 2315$\AA, hereafter NUV) and IRAS ($\lambda = 60\mu$m) surveys respectively. They are built in order to get detection at both wavelengths for most of the galaxies. Star formation rate (SFR) estimators based on the UV and FIR emissions are compared. Systematic differences are found between the SFR estimators for individual galaxies based on the NUV fluxes corrected for dust attenuation and on the total IR luminosity. A combined estimator based on NUV and IR luminosities seems to be the best proxy over the whole range of values of SFR. Although both samples present similar average values of the birthrate parameter b, their star-formation-related properties are substantially different: NUV-selected galaxies tend to show larger values of $b$ for lower masses, SFRs and dust attenuations, supporting previous scenarios for the star formation history (SFH). Conversely, about 20% of the FIR-selected galaxies show high values of $b$, SFR and NUV attenuation. These galaxies, most of them being LIRGs and ULIRGs, break down the downsizing picture for the SFH, however their relative contribution per unit volume is small in the local Universe. Finally, the cosmic SFR density of the local Universe is estimated in a consistent way from the NUV and IR luminosities.
  • (Abridged) Far ultraviolet to far infrared images of the nearby galaxy NGC5194, from Spitzer, GALEX, Hubble Space Telescope and ground--based data, are used to investigate local and global star formation, and the impact of dust extinction in HII-emitting knots. In the IR/UV-UV color plane, the NGC5194 HII knots show the same trend observed for normal star-forming galaxies, having a much larger dispersion than starburst galaxies. We identify the dispersion as due to the UV emission predominantly tracing the evolved, non-ionizing stellar population, up to ages 50-100 Myr. While in starbursts the UV light traces the current SFR, in NGC5194 it traces a combination of current and recent-past SFR. Unlike the UV emission, the monochromatic 24 micron luminosity is an accurate local SFR tracer for the HII knots in NGC5194; this suggests that the 24 micron emission carriers are mainly heated by the young, ionizing stars. However, preliminary results show that the ratio of the 24 micron emission to the SFR varies by a factor of a few from galaxy to galaxy. While also correlated with star formation, the 8 micron emission is not directly proportional to the number of ionizing photons. This confirms earlier suggestions that the carriers of the 8 micron emission are heated by more than one mechanism.
  • The ELAIS S1 field was observed by GALEX in both its Wide Spectroscopic and Deep Imaging Survey modes. This field was previously observed by the Infrared Space Observatory and we made use of the catalogue of multi-wavelength data published by the ELAIS consortium to select galaxies common to the two samples. Among the 959 objects with GALEX spectroscopy, 88 are present in the ELAIS catalog and 19 are galaxies with an optical spectroscopic redshift. The distribution of redshifts covers the range $0<z<1.6$. The selected galaxies have bolometric IR luminosities $10<Log(L_{IR})<13$ (deduced from the $15 \mu m$ flux using ISOCAM) which means that we cover a wide range of galaxies from normal to Ultra Luminous IR Galaxies. The mean ($\sigma$) UV luminosity (not corrected for extinction) amounts to $Log(\lambda.L_{1530}) = 9.8 (0.6)$ $L_\sun$ for the low-z ($z \le 0.35$) sample. The UV slope $\beta$ (assuming $f_\lambda \propto \lambda^\beta$) correlates with the GALEX FUV-NUV color if the sample is restricted to galaxies below $z < 0.1$. Taking advantage of the UV and IR data, we estimate the dust attenuation from the IR/UV ratio and compare it to the UV slope $\beta$. We find that it is not possible to uniquely estimate the dust attenuation from $\beta$ for our sample of galaxies. These galaxies are highly extinguished with a median value $A_{FUV} = 2.7 \pm 0.8$. Once the dust correction applied, the UV- and IR-based SFRs correlate. For the closest galaxy with the best quality spectrum, we see a feature consistent with being produced by a bump near 220nm in the attenuation curve.
  • We use the far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) images of M83 obtained by GALEX to compute the radial profile of the UV spectral slope in the star forming disk. We briefly present a model of its chemical evolution which allows us to obtain realistic intrinsic properties of the stellar populations. Using corollary data, we also compute the profiles of H-alpha/H-beta and of the total IR (TIR) to FUV ratio. Both data and model are used to estimate and compare the extinction gradients at the FUV wavelength obtained from these various indicators. We discuss the implications for the determination of the star formation rate.
  • We compare the dust attenuation properties of two samples of galaxies purely selected in the near-ultraviolet (NUV) band (1750-2750 A, lambda_m = 2310 A) and in the far-infrared (FIR) at 60micron. These samples are built using the GALEX and IRAS sky surveys over ~600 square degrees. The NUV selected sample contains 95 galaxies detected down to NUV=16mag (AB system). 83 galaxies in this sample are spirals or irregulars and only two of them are not detected at 60micron. The FIR selected sample is built from the IRAS PSCz catalog complete down to 0.6Jy. Among the 163 sources, we select 118 star forming galaxies well measured by IRAS, all but 1 are detected in NUV and 14 galaxies are not detected in the far-ultraviolet (FUV) band (1350-1750 A, lambda_m = 1530 A). The dust to ultraviolet (NUV and FUV) flux ratio is calibrated to estimate the dust attenuation at both wavelengths. The median value of the attenuation in NUV is found to be ~1 mag for the NUV selected sample versus ~2 mag for the FIR selected one. Within both samples, the dust attenuation is found to correlate with the luminosity of the galaxies. Almost all the NUV selected galaxies and 2/3 of the FIR selected sample exhibit a lower dust attenuation than that expected from the tight relation found previously for starburst galaxies between the dust attenuation and the slope of the ultraviolet continuum. The situation is inverse for one third of the FIR selected galaxies: their extinction is higher than that deduced from their FUV-NUV color and the relation valid for starbursts.
  • We derive a variety of physical parameters including star formation rates (SFRs), dust attenuation and burst mass fractions for 6472 galaxies observed by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) and present in the SDSS DR1 main spectroscopic sample. Parameters are estimated in a statistical way by comparing each observed broad-band SED (two GALEX and five SDSS bands) with an extensive library of model galaxy SEDs, which cover a wide range of star formation histories and include stochastic starbursts. We compare the constraints derived using SDSS bands only with those derived using the combination of SDSS and GALEX photometry. We find that the addition of the GALEX bands leads to significant improvement in the estimation of both the dust optical depth and the star formation rate over timescales of 100 Myr to 1 Gyr in a galaxy. We are sensitive to SFRs as low as 10^{-3} M_sun/yr, and we find that low levels of star formation (SF) are mostly associated with early-type, red galaxies. The least massive galaxies have ratios of current to past-averaged SF rates (b-parameter) consistent with constant SF over a Hubble time. For late-type galaxies, this ratio on average decreases with mass. We find that b correlates tightly with NUV-r color, implying that the SF history of a galaxy can be constrained on the basis of the NUV-r color alone. The fraction of galaxies that have undergone a significant starburst episode within the last 1 Gyr steeply declines with mass-from ~20% for galaxies with ~10^8 M_sun to ~5% for ~10^11 M_sun galaxies.
  • We present ultraviolet photometry for a sample of morphologically early-type galaxies selected by matching the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 1 with the GALEX Medium and All-sky Imaging Surveys. We obtain a working sample of 1032 early-type galaxies with GALEX FUV detections, SDSS spectroscopy, and $z<0.2$. Using the SDSS spectra to identify galaxies with even weak star formation or evidence of AGN, and further removing galaxies with any evidence of non early-type morphology, we derive a final sample of 172 red quiescent early-type galaxies. We find that the $FUV-r$ color has a full range of 5 mag. Plotting against the $FUV-r$ color the metallicity sensitive Lick $\rm Mg_2$ and D4000 indices, and the stellar velocity dispersion, we find no correlation between our measurement of UV rising flux, and any parameter sensitive to metallicity.
  • M32, the compact elliptical-galaxy companion to the Andromeda spiral galaxy has been imaged by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) in two ultraviolet bands, centered at ~1500 (FUV) and 2300 Angstroms (NUV). The imaging data have been carefully decomposed so as to properly account for the complicated background contamination from the disk of M31. We have derived the surface brightness and color profiles finding a slightly positive color gradient of Delta(FUV-B)/Delta log(r)=+0.15+/-0.03 within one effective radius. Earlier data from the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope suggested that M32 had an extremely large (negative) FUV-optical color gradient (Delta(FUV-B)/Delta log(r)<-2), inverted with respect to the majority of gradients seen in giant elliptical galaxies. Our new results show that, despite of its very low UV-upturn, M32 has similar UV properties to those observed in luminous elliptical galaxies.
  • We present measurements of the FUV (1530A) and NUV (2310A) galaxy luminosity functions (LF) at low redshift (z<0.2) from GALEX observations matched to the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey. We split our FUV and NUV samples into two UV-bj color bins and two redshift bins. As observed at optical wavelengths, the local LF of the bluest galaxies tend to have steeper faint end slopes and fainter characteristic magnitudes M* than the reddest subsamples. We find evidence for color dependent evolution at very low redshift in both bands, with bright blue galaxies becoming dominant in the highest redshift bin. The evolution of the total LF is consistent with an 0.3 magnitude brightening between z=0 and 0.13, in agreement with the first analysis of deeper GALEX fields probing adjacent and higher redshifts.
  • The NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) satellite has obtained simultaneous near and far ultraviolet light curves of the ROTSE-I Catalog RR Lyrae ab-type variable star J143753.84+345924.8. A series of 38 GALEX Deep Imaging Survey observations well distributed in phase within the star's 0.56432d period shows an AB=4.9mag variation in the far UV (1350-1750A) band and an AB=1.8mag variation in the near UV (1750-2750A) band, compared with only a 0.8mag variation in the broad, unfiltered ROTSE-I (4500-10000A) band. These GALEX UV observations are the first to reveal a large RR Lyrae amplitude variation at wavelengths below 1800A. We compare the GALEX and ROTSE-I observations to predictions made by recent Kurucz stellar atmosphere models. We use published physical parameters for the comparable period (0.57433d), well-observed RR Lyrae star WY Antliae to compute predicted FUV, NUV, and ROTSE-I light curves for J143753.84+345924.8. The observed light curves agree with the Kurucz predictions for [Fe/H]=-1.25 to within AB=0.2mag in the GALEX NUV and ROTSE-I bands, and within 0.5mag in the FUV. At all metallicities between solar and one hundredth solar, the Kurucz models predict 6-8mag of variation at wavelengths between 1000-1700A. Other variable stars with similar temperature variations, such as Cepheids, should also have large-amplitude FUV light curves, observable during the ongoing GALEX imaging surveys.