• Models of pure gas-phase chemistry in well-shielded regions of molecular clouds predict relatively high levels of molecular oxygen, O2, and water, H2O. Contrary to expectation, the space missions SWAS and Odin found only very small amounts of water vapour and essentially no O2 in the dense star-forming interstellar medium. Only toward rho Oph A did Odin detect a weak line of O2 at 119 GHz in a beam size of 10 arcmin. A larger telescope aperture such as that of the Herschel Space Observatory is required to resolve the O2 emission and to pinpoint its origin. We use the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared aboard Herschel to obtain high resolution O2 spectra toward selected positions in rho Oph A. These data are analysed using standard techniques for O2 excitation and compared to recent PDR-like chemical cloud models. The 487.2GHz line was clearly detected toward all three observed positions in rho Oph A. In addition, an oversampled map of the 773.8GHz transition revealed the detection of the line in only half of the observed area. Based on their ratios, the temperature of the O2 emitting gas appears to vary quite substantially, with warm gas (> 50 K) adjacent to a much colder region, where temperatures are below 30 K. The exploited models predict O2 column densities to be sensitive to the prevailing dust temperatures, but rather insensitive to the temperatures of the gas. In agreement with these model, the observationally determined O2 column densities seem not to depend strongly on the derived gas temperatures, but fall into the range N(O2) = (3 to >6)e15/cm^2. Beam averaged O2 abundances are about 5e-8 relative to H2. Combining the HIFI data with earlier Odin observations yields a source size at 119 GHz of about 4 - 5 arcmin, encompassing the entire rho Oph A core.
  • High resolution mid-infrared spectra are presented for 155 nuclear and extranuclear regions from the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS). The fluxes for nine atomic forbidden and three molecular hydrogen mid-infrared emission lines are also provided, along with upper limits in key lines for infrared-faint targets. The SINGS sample shows a wide range in the ratio of [SIII]18.71um/[SIII]33.48um, but the average ratio of the ensemble indicates a typical interstellar electron density of 300-400 cm^{-3} on ~23"x15" scales and 500-600 cm^{-3} using ~11"x9" apertures, independent of whether the region probed is a star-forming nuclear, a star-forming extranuclear, or an AGN environment. Evidence is provided that variations in gas-phase metallicity play an important role in driving variations in radiation field hardness, as indicated by [NeIII]15.56um/[NeII]12.81um, for regions powered by star formation. Conversely, the radiation hardness for galaxy nuclei powered by accretion around a massive black hole is independent of metal abundance. Furthermore, for metal-rich environments AGN are distinguishable from star-forming regions by significantly larger [NeIII]15.56um/[NeII]12.81um ratios. Finally, [FeII]25.99um/[NeII]12.81um versus [SiII]34.82um/[SIII]33.48um also provides an empirical method for discerning AGN from normal star-forming sources. However, similar to [NeIII]15.56um/[NeII]12.81um, these mid-infrared line ratios lose their AGN/star-formation diagnostic powers for very low metallicity star-forming systems with hard radiation fields.
  • We report the results of a search for pure rotational molecular hydrogen emission from the circumstellar environments of young stellar objects with disks using the Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph (TEXES) on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility and the Gemini North Observatory. We searched for mid-infrared H2 emission in the S(1), S(2), and S(4) transitions. Keck/NIRSPEC observations of the H2 S(9) transition were included for some sources as an additional constraint on the gas temperature. We detected H2 emission from 6 of 29 sources observed: AB Aur, DoAr 21, Elias 29, GSS 30 IRS 1, GV Tau N, and HL Tau. Four of the six targets with detected emission are class I sources that show evidence for surrounding material in an envelope in addition to a circumstellar disk. In these cases, we show that accretion shock heating is a plausible excitation mechanism. The detected emission lines are narrow (~10 km/s), centered at the stellar velocity, and spatially unresolved at scales of 0.4 arcsec, which is consistent with origin from a disk at radii 10-50 AU from the star. In cases where we detect multiple emission lines, we derive temperatures > 500 K from ~1 M_earth of gas. Our upper limits for the non-detections place upper limits on the amount of H2 gas with T > 500 K of less than a few Earth masses. Such warm gas temperatures are significantly higher than the equilibrium dust temperatures at these radii, suggesting that the gas is decoupled from the dust in the regions we are studying and that processes such as UV, X-ray, and accretion heating may be important.
  • HST NICMOS narrowband images of the shocked molecular hydrogen emission in OMC-1 are analyzed to reveal new information on the BN/KL outflow. The outstanding morphological feature of this region is the array of molecular hydrogen ``fingers'' emanating from the general vicinity of IRc2 and the presence of several Herbig-Haro objects. The NICMOS images appear to resolve individual shock fronts. This work is a more quantitative and detailed analysis of our data from a previous paper (Schultz etal. 1999). Line strengths for the H_2 1--0 S(4) plus 2--1 S(6) lines at 1.89 micron are estimated from measurements with the Paschen_alpha continuum filter F190N at 1.90 micron, and continuum measurements at 1.66 and 2.15 micron. We compare the observed H_2 line strengths and ratios of the 1.89 micron and 2.12 micron 1--0 S(1) lines with models for molecular cloud shock waves. Most of the data cannot be fit by J-shocks, but are well matched by C-shocks with shock velocities in the range of 20--45 km/s and preshock densities of 10^{4} - 10^{6} cm^{-3}, similiar to values obtained in larger beam studies which averaged over many shocks. There is also some evidence that shocks with higher densities have lower velocities.
  • Physical dust models are presented for 65 galaxies in the SINGS survey that are strongly detected in the four IRAC bands and three MIPS bands. For each galaxy we estimate (1) the total dust mass, (2) the fraction of the dust mass contributed by PAHs, and (3) the intensity of the starlight heating the dust grains. We find that spiral galaxies have dust properties resembling the dust in the local region of the Milky Way, with similar dust-to-gas ratio, and similar PAH abundance. The observed SEDs, including galaxies with SCUBA photometry, can be reproduced by dust models that do not require "cold" (T<10K) dust. The dust-to-gas ratio is observed to be dependent on metallicity. In the interstellar media of galaxies with A_O=12+log(O/H)>8.1, grains contain a substantial fraction of interstellar Mg, Si and Fe. Galaxies with A_O<8.1 and extended HI envelopes in some cases appear to have global dust-to-gas ratios that are low for their measured oxygen abundance, but in the regions where infrared emission is detected, the dust-to-gas ratio generally appears to be consistent with a substantial fraction of interstellar Mg, Si, and Fe being contained in dust. The PAH index q_PAH -- the fraction of the dust mass in the form of PAHs -- correlates with metallicity. The nine galaxies in our sample with A_O<8.1 have a median q_PAH=1.0%, whereas galaxies with A_O>8.1 have a median q_PAH=3.55%. The derived dust masses favor a value X_CO approx 4e20 cm^{-2}(K kms)^{-1} for the CO to H_2 conversion factor. Except for some starbursting systems (Mrk33, Tolo89, NGC3049), dust in the diffuse ISM dominates the IR power.
  • The ultraviolet-to-radio continuum spectral energy distributions are presented for all 75 galaxies in the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS). A principal component analysis of the sample shows that most of the sample's spectral variations stem from two underlying components, one representative of a galaxy with a low infrared-to-ultraviolet ratio and one representative of a galaxy with a high infrared-to-ultraviolet ratio. The influence of several parameters on the infrared-to-ultraviolet ratio is studied (e.g., optical morphology, disk inclination, far-infrared color, ultraviolet spectral slope, and star formation history). Consistent with our understanding of normal star-forming galaxies, the SINGS sample of galaxies in comparison to more actively star-forming galaxies exhibits a larger dispersion in the infrared-to-ultraviolet versus ultraviolet spectral slope correlation. Early type galaxies, exhibiting low star formation rates and high optical surface brightnesses, have the most discrepant infrared-to-ultraviolet correlation. These results suggest that the star formation history may be the dominant regulator of the broadband spectral variations between galaxies. Finally, a new discovery shows that the 24 micron morphology can be a useful tool for parametrizing the global dust temperature and ultraviolet extinction in nearby galaxies. The dust emission in dwarf/irregular galaxies is clumpy and warm accompanied by low ultraviolet extinction, while in spiral galaxies there is typically a much larger diffuse component of cooler dust and average ultraviolet extinction. For galaxies with nuclear 24 micron emission, the dust temperature and ultraviolet extinction are relatively high compared to disk galaxies.
  • We analyze extensive data on NGC1377 from the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS). Within the category of nascent starbursts, that we previously selected by their infrared to radio continuum ratios in large excess of the average and their hot dust, NGC1377 has the largest infrared excess yet measured. Optical imaging reveals a morphological distortion suggestive of a recent accretion event. Infrared spectroscopy reveals a compact and opaque source dominated by a hot, self-absorbed continuum (tau ~ 20 in the 10 micron silicate band). We provide physical evidence against non-stellar activity being the heating source. HII regions are detected through the single [NeII] line, probing <1% of the ionizing radiation. Not only is the optical depth very high, but >85% of ionizing photons are suppressed by dust. The only other detected emission features are molecular hydrogen lines, arguably excited mainly by shocks, besides photodissociation regions, and weak aromatic bands. The new observations support our interpretation in terms of an extremely young starburst (<1 Myr). More generally, galaxies deficient in radio synchrotron are likely observed within a few Myr of the onset of a starburst and after a long quiescence, prior to the replenishment of the ISM with cosmic rays. The similar infrared-radio properties of NGC1377 and some infrared-luminous galaxies suggest that NGC1377 constitutes an archetype to better understand starburst evolution. Although rare locally because observed in a brief evolutionary stage, nascent starbursts may represent a non-negligible fraction of merger-induced starbursts dominating deep infrared counts. Since they differ dramatically from usual starburst templates, they bear important consequences for the interpretation of deep surveys.
  • Mid-infrared diagnostics are presented for a large portion of the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS) sample plus archival data from the Infrared Space Observatory and the Spitzer Space Telescope. Our main result is that these mid-infrared diagnostics effectively constrain a target's dominant power source. The combination of a high ionization line index and PAH strength serves as an efficient discriminant between AGN and star-forming nuclei, confirming progress made with ISO spectroscopy on starbursting and ultraluminous infrared galaxies. The sensitivity of Spitzer allows us to probe fainter nuclei and star-forming regions within galaxy disks. We find that both star-forming nuclei and extranuclear regions stand apart from nuclei that are powered by Seyfert or LINER activity. In fact, we identify areas within four diagnostic diagrams containing >90% Seyfert/LINER nuclei or >90% HII regions/HII nuclei. We also find that, compared to starbursting nuclei, extranuclear regions typically separate even further from AGN, especially for low-metallicity extranuclear environments. In addition, instead of the traditional mid-infrared approach to differentiating between AGN and star-forming sources that utilizes relatively weak high-ionization lines, we show that strong low-ionization cooling lines of X-ray dominated regions like [SiII] 34.82 micron can alternatively be used as excellent discrimants. Finally, the typical target in this sample shows relatively modest interstellar electron density (~400 cm^{-3}) and obscuration (A_V ~ 1.0 mag for a foreground screen), consistent with a lack of dense clumps of highly obscured gas and dust residing in the emitting regions. [Abridged]
  • (Abridged) We present an initial look at the far infrared-radio correlation within the star-forming disks of four nearby, nearly face-on galaxies (NGC 2403, NGC 3031, NGC 5194, and NGC 6946). Using Spitzer MIPS imaging and WSRT radio continuum data, observed as part of the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS), we are able to probe variations in the logarithmic 24mu/22cm (q_24) and 70mu/22cm (q_70) surface brightness ratios across each disk at sub-kpc scales. We find general trends of decreasing q_24 and q_70 with declining surface brightness and with increasing radius. The residual dispersion around the trend of q_24 and q_70 versus surface brightness is smaller than the residual dispersion around the trend of q_24 and q_70 versus radius, on average by ~0.1 dex, indicating that the distribution of star formation sites is more important in determining the infrared/radio disk appearance than the exponential profiles of disks. We have also performed preliminary phenomenological modeling of cosmic ray electron (CRe^-) diffusion using an image-smearing technique, and find that smoothing the infrared maps improves their correlation with the radio maps. Exponential kernels tend to work better than Gaussian kernels which suggests that additional processes besides simple random-walk diffusion in three dimensions must affect the evolution of CRe^-s. The best fit smoothing kernels for the two less active star-forming galaxies (NGC 2403 and NGC 3031) have much larger scale-lengths than those of the more active star-forming galaxies (NGC 5194 and NGC 6946). This difference may be due to the relative deficit of recent CRe^- injection into the interstellar medium (ISM) for the galaxies having largely quiescent disks.
  • The Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS) is carrying out a comprehensive multi-wavelength survey on a sample of 75 nearby galaxies. The 1-850um spectral energy distributions are presented using broadband imaging data from Spitzer, 2MASS, ISO, IRAS, and SCUBA. The infrared colors derived from the globally-integrated Spitzer data are generally consistent with the previous generation of models that were developed based on global data for normal star-forming galaxies, though significant deviations are observed. Spitzer's excellent sensitivity and resolution also allow a detailed investigation of the infrared spectral energy distributions for various locations within the three large, nearby galaxies NGC3031 (M81), NGC5194 (M51), and NGC7331. Strong correlations exist between the local star formation rate and the infrared colors f_nu(70um)/f_nu(160um) and f_nu(24um)/f_nu(160um), suggesting that the 24 and 70um emission are useful tracers of the local star formation activity level. Preliminary evidence indicates that variations in the 24um emission, and not variations in the emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at 8um, drive the variations in the f_nu(8.0um)/f_nu(24um) colors within NGC3031, NGC5194, and NGC7331. If the galaxy-to-galaxy variations in spectral energy distributions seen in our sample are representative of the range present at high redshift then extrapolations of total infrared luminosities and star formation rates from the observed 24um flux will be uncertain at the factor-of-five level (total range). The corresponding uncertainties using the redshifted 8.0um flux (e.g. observed 24um flux for a z=2 source) are factors of 10-20. Considerable caution should be used when interpreting such extrapolated infrared luminosities.
  • (Abridged) Far ultraviolet to far infrared images of the nearby galaxy NGC5194, from Spitzer, GALEX, Hubble Space Telescope and ground--based data, are used to investigate local and global star formation, and the impact of dust extinction in HII-emitting knots. In the IR/UV-UV color plane, the NGC5194 HII knots show the same trend observed for normal star-forming galaxies, having a much larger dispersion than starburst galaxies. We identify the dispersion as due to the UV emission predominantly tracing the evolved, non-ionizing stellar population, up to ages 50-100 Myr. While in starbursts the UV light traces the current SFR, in NGC5194 it traces a combination of current and recent-past SFR. Unlike the UV emission, the monochromatic 24 micron luminosity is an accurate local SFR tracer for the HII knots in NGC5194; this suggests that the 24 micron emission carriers are mainly heated by the young, ionizing stars. However, preliminary results show that the ratio of the 24 micron emission to the SFR varies by a factor of a few from galaxy to galaxy. While also correlated with star formation, the 8 micron emission is not directly proportional to the number of ionizing photons. This confirms earlier suggestions that the carriers of the 8 micron emission are heated by more than one mechanism.
  • The nearby spiral galaxy NGC 7331 was spectrally mapped from 5-38um using all modules of Spitzer's IRS spectrograph. A strong new dust emission feature, presumed due to PAHs, was discovered at 17.1um. The feature's intensity is nearly half that of the ubiquitous 11.3um band. The 7-14um spectral maps revealed significant variation in the 7.7 and 11.3um PAH features between the stellar ring and nucleus. Weak [OIV] 25.9um line emission was found to be centrally concentrated in the nucleus, with an observed strength over 10% of the combined neon line flux, indicating an AGN or unusually active massive star photo-ionization. Two [SIII] lines fix the characteristic electron density in the HII regions at n_e < ~200 cm^-3. Three detected H_2 rotational lines, tracing warm molecular gas, together with the observed IR continuum, are difficult to match with standard PDR models. Either additional PDR heating or shocks are required to simultaneously match lines and continuum.
  • In this paper we discuss the propagation of dust through the interstellar medium (ISM), and describe the destructive effects of stellar winds, jets, and supernova shock waves on interstellar dust. We review the probability that grains formed in stellar outflows or supernovae survive processing in and propagation through the ISM, and incorporate themselves relatively unprocessed into meteoritic bodies in the solar system. We show that very large (radii >= 5 micron) and very small grains (radii <= 100 Angstrom) with sizes similar to the pre-solar SiC and diamond grains extracted from meteorites, can survive the passage through 100\kms shock waves relatively unscathed. High velocity (>= 250 km/s) shocks destroy dust efficiently. However, a small (~10%) fraction of the stardust never encountered such fast shocks before incorporation into the solar system. All grains should therefore retain traces of their passage through interstellar shocks during their propagation through the ISM. The grain surfaces should show evidence of processing due to sputtering and pitting due to small grain cratering collisions on the micron-sized grains. This conclusion seems to be in conflict with the evidence from the large grains recovered from meteorites which seem to show little interstellar processing.
  • We analyze the new mid-infrared maps of NGC 6946 for variations in the color ratio of the 7-to-15 micron emission. Our preliminary findings are that this mid-infrared color is remarkably constant between arms and inter-arm regions, and as a function of radius in the disk, excluding the nuclear region. As surface brightness ranges by more than an order of magnitude and the radius runs from about 0.5 to 3kpc, the color ratio remains constant to about +/-20%. Our interpretation is that (1) hard UV radiation from OB stars does not dominate the heating of the grains radiating in the mid-infrared; and (2) that surface brightness variations are driven primarily by surface-filling fraction in the disk, and by radiation intensity increases in starburst environments, such as the nucleus of NGC 6946.