• We report the discovery of eight new giant planets, and updated orbits for four known planets, orbiting dwarf and subgiant stars using the CORALIE, HARPS, and MIKE instruments as part of the Calan-Hertfordshire Extrasolar Planet Search. The planets have masses in the range 1.1-5.4MJs, orbital periods from 40-2900 days, and eccentricities from 0.0-0.6. They include a double-planet system orbiting the most massive star in our sample (HD147873), two eccentric giant planets (HD128356b and HD154672b), and a rare 14 Herculis analogue (HD224538b). We highlight some population correlations from the sample of radial velocity detected planets orbiting nearby stars, including the mass function exponential distribution, confirmation of the growing body of evidence that low-mass planets tend to be found orbiting more metal-poor stars than giant planets, and a possible period-metallicity correlation for planets with masses >0.1MJ, based on a metallicity difference of 0.16 dex between the population of planets with orbital periods less than 100 days and those with orbital periods greater than 100 days.
  • Knowledge of the stellar content near the Sun is important for a broad range of topics ranging from the search for planets to the study of Milky Way structure. The most powerful method for identifying potentially nearby stars is proper motion (PM) surveys. All old optical surveys avoid, or are at least substantially incomplete, near the Galactic plane. The depth and breadth of the "Vista Variables in Via Lactea" (VVV) near-IR survey significantly improves this situation. Taking advantage of the VVV survey database, we have measured PMs in the densest regions of the MW bulge and southern plane in order to complete the census of nearby objects. We have developed a custom PM pipeline based on VVV catalogues from the Cambridge Astronomy Survey Unit (CASU), by comparing the first epoch of JHKs with the multi-epoch Ks-bands acquired later. Taking advantage of the large time baseline between the 2MASS and the VVV observations, we also obtained 2MASS-VVV PMs. We present a near-IR proper motion catalogue for the whole area of the VVV survey, which includes 3003 moving stellar sources. All of these have been visually inspected and are real PM objects. Our catalogue is in very good agreement with the proper motion data supplied in IR catalogues outside the densest zone of the MW. The majority of the PM objects in our catalogue are nearby M-dwarfs, as expected. This new database allow us to identify 57 common proper motion binary candidates, among which are two new systems within ~30pc of the Sun.
  • We report the discovery of an L dwarf companion to the A3V star \beta{} Circini. VVV J151721.49-585131.5, or \beta{} Cir B, was identified in a proper motion and parallax catalogue of the Vista Variables in the V\'{i}a L\'{a}ctea survey as having near infrared luminosity and colour indicative of an early L dwarf, and a proper motion and parallax consistent with that of \beta{} Cir. The projected separation of $\sim$3.6' corresponds to $6656$ au, which is unusually wide. The most recent published estimate of the age of the primary combined with our own estimate based on newer isochrones yields an age of $370-500$ Myr. The system therefore serves as a useful benchmark at an age greater than that of the Pleiades brown dwarfs and most other young L dwarf benchmarks. We have obtained a medium resolution echelle spectrum of the companion which indicates a spectral type of L1.0$\pm$0.5 and lacks the typical signatures of low surface gravity seen in younger brown dwarfs. This suggests that signs of low surface gravity disappear from the spectra of early L dwarfs by an age of $\sim370-500$ Myr, as expected from theoretical isochrones. The mass of \beta{} Cir B is estimated from the BHAC15 isochrones as $0.056\pm0.007$ M$_{\odot}$.
  • We report the discovery of WTS-1b, the first extrasolar planet found by the WFCAM Transit Survey, which began observations at the 3.8-m United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) in August 2007. Light curves comprising almost 1200 epochs with a photometric precision of better than 1 per cent to J ~ 16 were constructed for ~60000 stars and searched for periodic transit signals. For one of the most promising transiting candidates, high-resolution spectra taken at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) allowed us to estimate the spectroscopic parameters of the host star, a late-F main sequence dwarf (V=16.13) with possibly slightly subsolar metallicity, and to measure its radial velocity variations. The combined analysis of the light curves and spectroscopic data resulted in an orbital period of the substellar companion of 3.35 days, a planetary mass of 4.01 +- 0.35 Mj and a planetary radius of 1.49+0.16-0.18 Rj. WTS-1b has one of the largest radius anomalies among the known hot Jupiters in the mass range 3-5 Mj. The high irradiation from the host star ranks the planet in the pM class.
  • We report the parallax and proper motion of five L dwarfs obtained with observations from the robotic Liverpool Telescope. Our derived proper motions are consistent with published values and have considerably smaller errors. Based on our spectral type versus absolute magnitude diagram, we do not find any evidence for binaries among our sample, or, at least no comparable mass binaries. Their space velocities locate them within the thin disk and based on the model comparisons they have solar-like abundances. For all five objects, we derived effective temperature, luminosity, radius, gravity and mass from a evolutionary model(CBA00) and our measured parallax; moreover, we derived their effective temperature by integrating observed optical and near-infrared spectra and model spectra (BSH06 or BT-Dusty respectively) at longer wavelengths to obtain bolometric {\bf flux using} the classical Stefan-Boltzmann law: generally the three temperatures for one object derived using two different methods with three models are consistent, while at lower temperature(e.g. for L4) the differences among the three temperatures are slightly larger than that at higher temperature(e.g. for L1).
  • In this paper we present the discovery of a highly unequal-mass eclipsing M-dwarf binary, providing a unique constraint on binary star formation theory and on evolutionary models for low-mass binary stars. The binary is discovered using high- precision infrared light curves from the WFCAM Transit Survey (WTS) and has an orbital period of 2.44 d. We find stellar masses of M1 = 0.53 (0.02) Msun and M2 = 0.143 (0.006) Msun (mass ratio 0.27), and radii of R1 = 0.51 (0.01) Rsun and R2 = 0.174 (0.006) Rsun. This puts the companion in a very sparsely sampled and important late M-dwarf mass-regime. Since both stars share the same age and metallicity and straddle the theoretical boundary between fully and partially convective stellar interiors, a comparison can be made to model predictions over a large range of M-dwarf masses using the same model isochrone. Both stars appear to have a slightly inflated radius compared to 1 Gyr model predictions for their masses, but future work is needed to properly account for the effects of star spots on the light curve solution. A significant, subsynchronous, ~2.56 d signal with ~2% peak-to-peak amplitude is detected in the WFCAM light curve, which we attribute to rotational modulation of cool star spots. We propose that the subsynchronous rotation is either due to a stable star-spot complex at high latitude on the (magnetically active) primary (i.e. differential rotation), or to additional magnetic braking, or to interaction of the binary with a third body or circumbinary disk during its pre-main-sequence phase.
  • We present the results of a study of the stellar activity in the solar neighborhood using complete kinematics (galactocentric velocities U,V,W) and the chromospheric activity index $\log R'_{\rm{HK}}$. We analyzed the average activity level near the centers of known moving groups using a sample of 2529 stars and found that the stars near these associations tend to be more active than field stars. This supports the hypothesis that these structures, or at least a significant part of them, are composed of kinematically bound, young stars. We confirmed our results by using Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) UV data and kinematics taken from the Geneva-Copenhagen Survey for the stars in the sample. Finally, we present a compiled catalog with kinematics and activities for 2529 stars and a list of potential moving group members selected based on their stellar activity level.
  • We report on the discovery of four ultra-short period (P<0.18 days) eclipsing M-dwarf binaries in the WFCAM Transit Survey. Their orbital periods are significantly shorter than of any other known main-sequence binary system, and are all significantly below the sharp period cut-off at P~0.22 days as seen in binaries of earlier type stars. The shortest-period binary consists of two M4 type stars in a P=0.112 day orbit. The binaries are discovered as part of an extensive search for short-period eclipsing systems in over 260,000 stellar lightcurves, including over 10,000 M-dwarfs down to J=18 mag, yielding 25 binaries with P<0.23 days. In a popular paradigm, the evolution of short period binaries of cool main-sequence stars is driven by loss of angular momentum through magnetised winds. In this scheme, the observed P~0.22 day period cut-off is explained as being due to timescales that are too long for lower-mass binaries to decay into tighter orbits. Our discovery of low-mass binaries with significantly shorter orbits implies that either these timescales have been overestimated for M-dwarfs, e.g. due to a higher effective magnetic activity, or that the mechanism for forming these tight M-dwarf binaries is different from that of earlier type main-sequence stars.
  • We analyse medium-resolution spectra (R\sim 18000) of 19 late type dwarfs in order to determine vsini-s using synthetic rather than observational template spectra. For this purpose observational data around 2.2 $\mu$m of stars with spectral classes from G8V to M9.5V were modelled. We find that the Na I (2.2062 and 2.2090 $\mu$m) and $^{12}$CO 2-0 band features are modelled well enough to use for vsini determination without the need for a suitable observational template spectra. Within the limit of the resolution of our spectra, we use synthetic spectra templates to derive vsini values consistent with those derived in the optical regime using observed templates. We quantify the errors in our vsini determination due to incorrect choice of model parameters \Teff, log $g$, $v_{\rm micro}$, [Fe/H] or FWHM and show that they are typically less than 10 per cent. We note that the spectral resolution of our data(\sim 16 km/s) limited this study to relatively fast rotators and that resolutions of 60000 will required to access most late-type dwarfs.
  • We describe our procedure to determine effective temperatures, rotational velocities, microturbulent velocities, and chemical abundances in the atmospheres of Sun-like stars. We use independent determinations of iron abundances using the fits to the observed Fe I and Fe II atomic absorption lines. We choose the best solution from the fits to these spectral features for the model atmosphere that provides the best confidence in the determined log N(Fe), Vt, and vsini. First, we compute the abundance of iron for a set of adopted microturbulent velocities. To determine the most self-consistent effective temperature and microturbulent velocity in any star's atmosphere, we used an additional constraint where we minimise the dependence of the derived abundances of Fe I and Fe II on the excitation potential of the corresponding lines. We analyse the spectra of the Sun and two well known solar type stars, HD1835 and HD10700 to determine their abundances, microturbulent velocity and rotational velocity. For the Sun abundances of elements obtained from the fits of their absorption features agree well enough (+/- 0.1 dex) with the known values for the Sun. We determined a rotational velocity of vsini = 1.6 +/- 0.3 km/s for the spectrum of the Sun as a star. For HD1835 the self-consistent solution for Fe I and Fe II lines log N(Fe)=+0.2 was obtained with a model atmosphere of 5807/4.47/+0.2 andmicroturbulent velocity Vt = 0.75 km/s, and leads to vsini = 7.2 $\pm$ 0.5 km/s. For HD10700 the self-consistent solution log N(Fe) = -4.93 was obtained using a model atmosphere of 5383/4.59/-0.6and microturbulent velocity Vt = 0.5 km/s. The Fe I and Fe II lines give rise to a vsini = 2.4 +/- 0.4 km/s. Using the Teff found from the ionisation equilibrium parameters for all three stars, we found abundances of a number of other elements: Ti, Ni, Ca, Si, Cr. ... Abriged.
  • We present parallaxes of 11 mid-to-late T dwarfs observed in the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey. We use these results to test the reliability of model predictions in magnitude-color space, determine a magnitude-spectral type calibration, and, estimate a bolometric luminosity and effective temperature range for the targets. We used observations from the UKIRT WFCAM instrument pipeline processed at the Cambridge Astronomical Survey Unit. The parallaxes and proper motions of the sample were calculated using standard procedures. The bolometric luminosity was estimated using near- and mid-infrared observations with two different methods. The corresponding effective temperature ranges were found adopting a large age-radius range. We show the models are unable to predict the colors of the latest T dwarfs indicating the incompleteness of model opacities for NH3, CH4 and H2 as the temperature declines. We report the effective temperature ranges obtained.
  • We present the discovery of the first T dwarf + white dwarf binary system LSPM 1459+0857AB, confirmed through common proper motion and spectroscopy. The white dwarf is a high proper motion object from the LSPM catalogue that we confirm spectroscopically to be a relatively cool (Teff=5535+\-45K) and magnetic (B~2MG) hydrogen-rich white dwarf, with an age of at least 4.8Gyrs. The T dwarf is a recent discovery from the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (ULAS 1459+0857), and has a spectral type of T4.5+\-0.5 and a distance in the range 43-69pc. With an age constraint (inferred from the white dwarf) of >4.8Gyrs we estimate Teff=1200-1500K and logg=5.4-5.5 for ULAS 1459+0857, making it a benchmark T dwarf with well constrained surface gravity. We also compare the T dwarf spectra with the latest LYON group atmospheric model predictions, which despite some shortcomings are in general agreement with the observed properties of ULAS 1459+0857. The separation of the binary components (16,500-26,500AU, or 365 arcseconds on the sky) is consistent with an evolved version of the more common brown dwarf + main-sequence binary systems now known, and although the system has a wide separation, it is shown to be statistically robust as a non spurious association. The observed colours of the T dwarf show that it is relatively bright in the z band compared to other T dwarfs of similar type, and further investigation is warranted to explore the possibility that this could be a more generic indicator of older T dwarfs. Future observations of this binary system will provide even stronger constraints on the T dwarf properties, and additional systems will combine to give a more comprehensively robust test of the model atmospheres in this temperature regime.
  • We study a target sample of 68 low-mass objects (with spectral types in the range M4.5-L1) previously selected via photometric and astrometric criteria, as possible members of five young moving groups: the Local Association (Pleiades moving group, age=20 - 150 Myr), the Ursa Mayor group (Sirius supercluster, age=300 Myr), the Hyades supercluster (age=600 Myr), IC 2391 supercluster (age=35 - 55 Myr) and the Castor moving group (age=200 Myr). In this paper we assess their membership by using different kinematic and spectroscopic criteria. We use high resolution echelle spectroscopic observations of the sample to measure accurate radial velocities (RVs). Distances are calculated and compared to those of the moving group from the literature, we also calculate the kinematic Galactic components (U,V,W) of the candidate members and apply kinematic criterion of membership to each group. In addition we measure rotational velocities (v sin i) to place further constraints on membership of kinematic members. We find that 49 targets have young disk kinematics and that 36 of them possibly belong to one of our five moving groups. From the young disk target ob jects, 31 have rotational velocities in agreement with them belonging to the young disk population. We also find that one of our moving group candidates, 2MASS0123- 3610, is a low-mass double lined spectroscopic binary, with probable spectral types around M7.
  • We report the discovery of 47 new T dwarfs in the Fourth Data Release (DR4) from the Large Area Survey (LAS) of the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey with spectral types ranging from T0 to T8.5. These bring the total sample of LAS T dwarfs to 80 as of DR4. In assigning spectral types to our objects we have identified 8 new spectrally peculiar objects, and divide 7 of them into two classes. H2O-H-early have a H2O-H index that differs with the H2O-J index by at least 2 sub-types. CH4-J-early have a CH4-J index that disagrees with the H20-J index by at least 2 subtypes. We have ruled out binarity as a sole explanation for both types of peculiarity, and suggest that they may represent hitherto unrecognised tracers of composition and/or gravity. Clear trends in z'(AB)-J and Y-J are apparent for our sample, consistent with weakening absorption in the red wing of the KI line at 0.77microns with decreasing effective temperature. We have used our sample to estimate space densities for T6-T9 dwarfs. By comparing our sample to Monte-Carlo simulations of field T dwarfs for various mass functions of the form phi(M) \propto M^-alpha, we have placed weak constraints on the form of the field mass function. Our analysis suggests that the substellar mass function is declining at lower masses, with negative values of alpha preferred. This is at odds with results for young clusters that have been generally found to have alpha > 0.
  • Direct imaging of brown dwarfs as companions to solar-type stars can provide a wealth of well-constrained data to "benchmark" the physics of such objects, since quantities like metallicity and age can be determined from their well-studied primaries. We present results from an adaptive optics imaging program on stars drawn from the Anglo-Australian and Keck Planet Search projects, with the aim of directly imaging known cool companions. Simulations have modeled the expected contrast ratios and separations of known companions using estimates of orbital parameters available from current radial-velocity data and then a selection of the best case objects were followed-up with high contrast imaging to attempt to directly image these companions. These simulations suggest that only a very small number of radial-velocity detected exoplanets with consistent velocity fits and age estimates could potentially be directly imaged using the VLT's Simultaneous Differential Imaging system and only under favorable conditions. We also present detectability confidence limits from the radial-velocity data sets and show how these can be used to gain a better understanding of these systems when combined with the imaging data. For HD32778 and HD91204 the detectabilities help little in constraining the companion and hence almost all our knowledge is drawn from the SDI images. Therefore, we can say that these stars do not host cool methane objects, out to on-sky separations of ~2'', with contrasts less than 10-11 magnitudes. However, for HD25874, HD120780 and HD145825, the contrasts and detectabilities can rule out a number of possible solutions, particularly at low angular separations, and for the best case, down to strong methane masses of 40MJ at 1'' separation. The contrast curves constructed for these five stars show 5 sigma contrasts (Delta F1) of ~9.2-11.5 magnitudes at separations of >/=0.6'', which correspond to contrasts of ~9.7-12.0 magnitudes for companions of mid-T spectral type. Such limits allow us to reach down to 40MJ around fairly old field dwarfs that typically constitute high precision radial-velocity programs. Finally, the analysis performed here can serve as a template for future projects that will employ extreme-AO systems to directly image planets already indirectly discovered by the radial-velocity method.
  • We report the discovery of a very cool d/sdL7+T7.5p common proper motion binary system, SDSS J1416+13AB, found by cross-matching the UKIDSS Large Area Survey Data Release 5 against the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. The d/sdL7 is blue in J-H and H-K and has other features suggestive of low-metallicity and/or high gravity. The T7.5p displays spectral peculiarity seen before in earlier type dwarfs discovered in UKIDSS LAS DR4, and referred to as CH4-J-early peculiarity. We suggest that CH4-J-early peculiarity arises from low-metallicity and/or high-gravity, and speculate as to its use for classifying T dwarfs. UKIDSS and follow-up UKIRT/WFCAM photometry shows the T dwarf to have the bluest near infrared colours yet seen for such an object with H-K = -1.31+/-0.17. Warm Spitzer IRAC photometry shows the T dwarf to have extremely red H-[4.5] = 4.86+/-0.04, which is the reddest yet seen for a substellar object. The lack of parallax measurement for the pair limits our ability to estimate parameters for the system. However, applying a conservative distance estimate of 5-15 pc suggests a projected separation in range 45-135 AU. By comparing H-K:H-[4.5] colours of the T dwarf to spectral models we estimate that Teff = 500 K and [M/H]~-0.30, with log g ~ 5.0. This suggests a mass of ~30 MJupiter for the T dwarf and an age of ~10 Gyr for the system. The primary would then be a 75MJupiter object with log g ~ 5.5 and a relatively dust-free Teff ~ 1500K atmosphere. Given the unusual properties of the system we caution that these estimates are uncertain. We eagerly await parallax measurements and high-resolution imaging which will constrain the parameters further.
  • The detailed study of the exoplanetary systems HD189733 and HD209458 has given rise to a wealth of exciting information on the physics of exoplanetary atmospheres. To further our understanding of the make-up and processes within these atmospheres we require a larger sample of bright transiting planets. We have began a project to detect more bright transiting planets in the southern hemisphere by utilising precision radial-velocity measurements. We have observed a constrained sample of bright, inactive and metal-rich stars using the HARPS instrument and here we present the current status of this project, along with our first discoveries which include a brown dwarf/extreme-Jovian exoplanet found in the brown dwarf desert region around the star HD191760 and improved orbits for three other exoplanetary systems HD48265, HD143361 and HD154672. Finally, we briefly discuss the future of this project and the current prospects we have for discovering more bright transiting planets.
  • The number of brown dwarfs (BDs) now identified tops 700. Yet our understanding of these cool objects is still lacking, and models are struggling to accurately reproduce observations. What is needed is a method of calibrating the models, BDs whose properties (e.g. age, mass, distance, metallicity) that can be independently determined can provide such calibration. The ability to calculate properties based on observables is set to be of vital importance if we are to be able to measure the properties of fainter, more distant populations of BDs that near-future surveys will reveal, for which ground based spectroscopic studies will become increasingly difficult. We present here the state of the current population of age benchmark brown dwarfs.
  • We use signal enhancement techniques and a matched filter analysis to search for the K band spectroscopic absorption signature of the close orbiting extrasolar giant planet, HD 189733b. With timeseries observations taken with NIRSPEC at the Keck II telescope, we investigate the relative abundances of H2O and carbon bearing molecules, which have now been identified in the dayside spectrum of HD 189733b. We detect a candidate planet signature with a low level of significance, close to the ~153 km/s velocity amplitude of HD 189733b. However, some systematic variations, mainly due to imperfect telluric line removal, remain in the residual spectral timeseries in which we search for the planetary signal. The robustness of our candidate signature is assessed, enabling us to conclude that it is not possible to confirm the presence of any planetary signal which appears at Fp/F* contrasts deeper than the 95.4 per cent confidence level. Our search does not enable us to detect the planet at a contrast ratio of Fp/F* = 1/1920 with 99.9 per cent confidence. We also investigate the effect of model uncertainties on our ability to reliably recover a planetary signal. The use of incorrect temperature, model opacity wavelengths and model temperature-pressure profiles have important consequences for the least squares deconvolution procedure that we use to boost the S/N ratio in our spectral timeseries observations. We find that mismatches between the empirical and model planetary spectrum may weaken the significance of a detection by ~30-60 per cent, thereby potentially impairing our ability to recover a planetary signal with high confidence.
  • We have begun a metal-rich planet search project using the HARPS instrument in La Silla, Chile to target planets with a high potential to transit their host star and add to the number of bright benchmark transiting planets. The sample currently consists of 100, bright (7.5 </= V </= 9.5) solar-type stars (0.5 </= B-V </= 0.9) in the southern hemisphere which are both inactive (logR'HK </= -4.5) and metal-rich ([Fe/H] >/= 0.1 dex). We determined the chromospheric activity and metallicity status of our sample using high resolution FEROS spectra. We also introduce the first result from our HARPS planet search and show that the radial-velocity amplitude of this star is consistent with an orbiting planetary-mass companion (i.e. Msini < 0.5MJ) with a period of ~5 days. We are currently engaged in follow-up to confirm this signal as a bonafide orbiting planet.
  • We have carried out a search for the 2.14 micron spectroscopic signature of the close orbiting extrasolar giant planet, HD 179949b. High cadence time series spectra were obtained with the CRIRES spectrograph at VLT1 on two closely separated nights. Deconvolution yielded spectroscopic profiles with mean S/N ratios of several thousand, enabling the near infrared contrast ratios predicted for the HD 179949 system to be achieved. Recent models have predicted that the hottest planets may exhibit spectral signatures in emission due to the presence of TiO and VO which may be responsible for a temperature inversion high in the atmosphere. We have used our phase dependent orbital model and tomographic techniques to search for the planetary signature under the assumption of an absorption line dominated atmospheric spectrum, where T and V are depleted from the atmospheric model, and an emission line dominated spectrum, where TiO and VO are present. We do not detect a planet in either case, but the 2.120 - 2.174 micron wavelength region covered by our observations enables the deepest near infrared limits yet to be placed on the planet/star contrast ratio of any close orbiting extrasolar giant planet system. We are able to rule out the presence of an atmosphere dominated by absorption opacities in the case of HD 179949b at a contrast ratio of F_p/F_* ~ 1/3350, with 99 per cent confidence.
  • We obtained 238 spectra of the close orbiting extrasolar giant planet HD 189733b with resolution R ~ 15,000 during one night of observations with the near infrared spectrograph, NIRSPEC, at the Keck II Telescope. We have searched for planetary absorption signatures in the 2.0 - 2.4 micron region where H_2O and CO are expected to be the dominant atmospheric opacities. We employ a phase dependent orbital model and tomographic techniques to search for the planetary absorption signatures in the combined stellar and planetary spectra. Because potential absorption signatures are hidden in the noise of each single exposure, we use a model list of lines to apply a spectral deconvolution. The resulting mean profile possesses a S/N ratio that is 20 times greater than that found in individual lines. Our spectral timeseries thus yields spectral signatures with a mean S/N = 2720. We are unable to detect a planetary signature at a contrast ratio of log_10(F_p/F_*) = -3.40, with 63.8 per cent confidence. Our findings are not consistent with model predictions which nevertheless give a good fit to mid-infrared observations of HD 189733. The 1-sigma result is a factor of 1.7 times less than the predicted 2.185 micron planet/star flux ratio of log_10(F_p/F_*) ~ -3.16.
  • We present a search for the near infrared spectroscopic signature of the close orbiting extrasolar giant planet HD 75289b. We obtained ~230 spectra in the wavelength range 2.18 - 2.19 microns using the Phoenix spectrograph at Gemini South. By considering the direct spectrum, derived from irradiated model atmospheres, we search for the absorption profile signature present in the combined star and planet light. Since the planetary spectrum is separated from the stellar spectrum at most phases, we apply a phase dependent orbital model and tomographic techniques to search for absorption signatures. Because the absorption signature lies buried in the noise of a single exposure we apply a multiline deconvolution to the spectral lines available in order to boost the effective S/N ratio of the data. The wavelength coverage of 80 angstroms is expected to contain ~100 planetary lines, enabling a mean line with S/N ratio of ~800 to be achieved after deconvolution. We are nevertheless unable to detect the presence of the planet in the data and carry out further simulations to show that broader wavelength coverage should enable a planet like HD 75289b to be detected with 99.9 per cent (4 sigma) confidence. We investigate the sensitivity of our method and estimate detection tolerances for mismatches between observed and model planetary atmospheres.
  • We report the discovery of twenty-one hitherto unknown bright southern ultracool dwarfs with spectral types in the range M7 to L5.5, together with new observations of a further three late M dwarfs previously confirmed. Three more objects are already identified in the literature as high proper motion stars;we derive their spectral types for the first time. All objects were selected from the 2MASS All Sky and SuperCOSMOS point source databases on the basis of their optical/near-infrared colours, $J$-band magnitudes and proper motions. Low resolution (R $\sim$ 1000) $JH$ spectroscopy with the ESO/NTT SOFI spectrograph has confirmed the ultracool nature of 24 targets, out of a total of 25 candidates observed. Spectral types are derived by direct comparison with template objects and compared to results from H$_2$O and FeH indices. We also report the discovery of one binary, as revealed by SOFI acquisition imaging; spectra were taken for both components. The spectral types of the two components are L2 and L4 and the distance $\sim$ 19 pc. Spectroscopic distances and transverse velocities are derived for the sample. Two $\sim$ L5 objects lie only $\sim$ 10 pc distant. Such nearby objects are excellent targets for further study to derive their parallaxes and to search for fainter, later companions with AO and/or methane imaging.
  • We have acquired high-resolution echelle spectra of 225 F6-M5 type stars in the southern hemisphere. The stars are targets or candidates to be targets for the Anglo-Australian Planet Search. CaII HK line cores were used to derive activity indices for all of these objects. The indices were converted to the Mt. Wilson system of measurements and logR'HK values determined. A number of these stars had no previously derived activity indices. In addition we have also included the stars from Tinney et al. (2002) using our Mt. Wilson calibration. The radial-velocity instability (also known as jitter) level was determined for all 21 planet-host stars in our dataset. We find the jitter to be at a level considerably below the radial-velocity signatures in all but one of these systems. 19 stars from our sample were found to be active (logR'HK > -4.5) and thus have high levels of jitter. Radial-velocity analysis for planetary companions to these stars should precede with caution.