• We present ACS, NICMOS, and Keck AO-assisted photometry of 20 Type Ia supernovae SNe Ia from the HST Cluster Supernova Survey. The SNe Ia were discovered over the redshift interval 0.623 < z < 1.415. Fourteen of these SNe Ia pass our strict selection cuts and are used in combination with the world's sample of SNe Ia to derive the best current constraints on dark energy. Ten of our new SNe Ia are beyond redshift $z=1$, thereby nearly doubling the statistical weight of HST-discovered SNe Ia beyond this redshift. Our detailed analysis corrects for the recently identified correlation between SN Ia luminosity and host galaxy mass and corrects the NICMOS zeropoint at the count rates appropriate for very distant SNe Ia. Adding these supernovae improves the best combined constraint on the dark energy density \rho_{DE}(z) at redshifts 1.0 < z < 1.6 by 18% (including systematic errors). For a LambdaCDM universe, we find \Omega_\Lambda = 0.724 +0.015/-0.016 (68% CL including systematic errors). For a flat wCDM model, we measure a constant dark energy equation-of-state parameter w = -0.985 +0.071/-0.077 (68% CL). Curvature is constrained to ~0.7% in the owCDM model and to ~2% in a model in which dark energy is allowed to vary with parameters w_0 and w_a. Tightening further the constraints on the time evolution of dark energy will require several improvements, including high-quality multi-passband photometry of a sample of several dozen z>1 SNe Ia. We describe how such a sample could be efficiently obtained by targeting cluster fields with WFC3 on HST.
  • We present an algorithm to photometrically calibrate wide field optical imaging surveys, that simultaneously solves for the calibration parameters and relative stellar fluxes using overlapping observations. The algorithm decouples the problem of "relative" calibrations, from that of "absolute" calibrations; the absolute calibration is reduced to determining a few numbers for the entire survey. We pay special attention to the spatial structure of the calibration errors, allowing one to isolate particular error modes in downstream analyses. Applying this to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging data, we achieve ~1% relative calibration errors across 8500 sq.deg. in griz; the errors are ~2% for the u band. These errors are dominated by unmodelled atmospheric variations at Apache Point Observatory. These calibrations, dubbed "ubercalibration", are now public with SDSS Data Release 6, and will be a part of subsequent SDSS data releases.
  • We present Keck diffraction limited H-band photometry of a z~1.3 Type Ia supernova (SN) candidate, first identified in a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) search for SNe in massive high redshift galaxy clusters. The adaptive optics (AO) data were obtained with the Laser Guide Star facility during four observing runs from September to November 2005. In the analysis of data from the observing run nearest to maximum SN brightness, the SN was found to have a magnitude H=23.9 +/- 0.14 (Vega). We present the H-band (approximately rest-frame R) light curve and provide a detailed analysis of the AO photometric uncertainties. By constraining the aperture correction with a nearby (4" separation) star we achieve 0.14 magnitude photometric precision, despite the spatially varying AO PSF.
  • We present the 3D real space clustering power spectrum of a sample of \~600,000 luminous red galaxies (LRGs) measured by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), using photometric redshifts. This sample of galaxies ranges from redshift z=0.2 to 0.6 over 3,528 deg^2 of the sky, probing a volume of 1.5 (Gpc/h)^3, making it the largest volume ever used for galaxy clustering measurements. We measure the angular clustering power spectrum in eight redshift slices and combine these into a high precision 3D real space power spectrum from k=0.005 (h/Mpc) to k=1 (h/Mpc). We detect power on gigaparsec scales, beyond the turnover in the matter power spectrum, on scales significantly larger than those accessible to current spectroscopic redshift surveys. We also find evidence for baryonic oscillations, both in the power spectrum, as well as in fits to the baryon density, at a 2.5 sigma confidence level. The statistical power of these data to constrain cosmology is ~1.7 times better than previous clustering analyses. Varying the matter density and baryon fraction, we find \Omega_M = 0.30 \pm 0.03, and \Omega_b/\Omega_M = 0.18 \pm 0.04, The detection of baryonic oscillations also allows us to measure the comoving distance to z=0.5; we find a best fit distance of 1.73 \pm 0.12 Gpc, corresponding to a 6.5% error on the distance. These results demonstrate the ability to make precise clustering measurements with photometric surveys (abridged).
  • We study the luminosity and color dependence of the galaxy 2-point correlation function in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, starting from a sample of 200,000 galaxies over 2500 deg^2. We concentrate on the projected correlation function w(r_p), which is directly related to the real space \xi(r). The amplitude of w(r_p) grows continuously with luminosity, rising more steeply above the characteristic luminosity L_*. Redder galaxies exhibit a higher amplitude and steeper correlation function at all luminosities. The correlation amplitude of blue galaxies increases continuously with luminosity, but the luminosity dependence for red galaxies is less regular, with bright red galaxies more strongly clustered at large scales and faint red galaxies more strongly clustered at small scales. We interpret these results using halo occupation distribution (HOD) models assuming concordance cosmological parameters. For most samples, an HOD model with two adjustable parameters fits the w(r_p) data better than a power-law, explaining inflections at r_p ~ 1-3 Mpc/h as the transition between the 1-halo and 2-halo regimes of \xi(r). The implied minimum mass for a halo hosting a central galaxy above a luminosity threshold L grows as M_min ~ L at low luminosities and more steeply above L_*. The mass at which an average halo has one satellite galaxy brighter than L is M_1 ~ 23 M_min(L). These results imply a conditional luminosity function (at fixed halo mass) in which central galaxies lie far above a Schechter function extrapolation of the satellite population. HOD models nicely explain the joint luminosity-color dependence of w(r_p) in terms of the color fractions of central and satellite populations as a function of halo mass. The inferred HOD properties are in good qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions.
  • We study the variation of the dark matter mass fraction of elliptical galaxies as a function of their luminosity, stellar mass, and size using a sample of 29,469 elliptical galaxies culled from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We model ellipticals as a stellar Hernquist profile embedded in an adiabatically compressed dark matter halo. This model allows us to estimate a dynamical mass ($M_{dynm}$) at the half-light radius from the velocity dispersion of the spectra, and to compare these to the stellar mass estimates ($M_{*}$) from Kauffmann et al (2003). We find that $M_{*}/L$ is independent of luminosity, while $M_{dynm}/L$ increases with luminosity, implying that the dark matter fraction increases with luminosity. We also observe that at a fixed luminosity or stellar mass, the dark matter fraction increases with increasing galaxy size or, equivalently, increases with decreasing surface brightness: high surface brightness galaxies show almost no evidence for dark matter, while in low surface brightness galaxies, the dark matter exceeds the stellar mass at the half light radius. We relate this to the fundamental plane of elliptical galaxies, suggesting that the tilt of this plane from simple virial predictions is due to the dark matter in galaxies. We find that a simple model where galaxies are embedded in dark matter halos and have a star formation efficiency independent of their surface brightness explains these trends. We estimate the virial mass of ellipticals as being approximately 7-30 times their stellar mass, with the lower limit suggesting almost all of the gas within the virial radius is converted into stars.
  • This chapter discusses Galactic dust and how its thermal emission confuses CMBR measurements. Interstellar dust grains are composed of many differing species, and observational evidence has only begun to disentagle their composition and sizes. Fortunately, their far-IR/millimeter emission is less complex. We describe how a very simple two-species model can describe the emission at 200 < nu < 3000 GHz to high precision. At lower frequencies, other non-thermal processes may dominate the emission from dust.