• With the first direct detection of merging black holes in 2015, the era of gravitational wave (GW) astrophysics began. A complete picture of compact object mergers, however, requires the detection of an electromagnetic (EM) counterpart. We report ultraviolet (UV) and X-ray observations by Swift and the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray (NuSTAR) of the EM counterpart of the binary neutron star merger GW170817. The bright, rapidly fading ultraviolet emission indicates a high mass ($\approx0.03$ solar masses) wind-driven outflow with moderate electron fraction ($Y_{e}\approx0.27$). Combined with the X-ray limits, we favor an observer viewing angle of $\approx 30^{\circ}$ away from the orbital rotation axis, which avoids both obscuration from the heaviest elements in the orbital plane and a direct view of any ultra-relativistic, highly collimated ejecta (a gamma-ray burst afterglow).
  • We report on the detection of a bright, short, structured X-ray burst coming from the supernova remnant RCW 103 on 2016 June 22 caught by the Swift/BAT monitor, and on the follow-up campaign made with Swift/XRT, Swift/UVOT and the optical/NIR GROND detector. The characteristics of this flash, such as duration, and spectral shape, are consistent with typical short bursts observed from soft gamma repeaters. The BAT error circle at 68 per cent confidence range encloses the point-like X-ray source at the centre of the nebula, 1E161348-5055. Its nature has been long debated due to a periodicity of 6.67 hr in X-rays, which could indicate either an extremely slow pulsating neutron star, or the orbital period of a very compact X-ray binary system. We found that 20 min before the BAT trigger, the soft X-ray emission of 1E161348-5055 was a factor of ~100 higher than measured 2 yr earlier, indicating that an outburst had already started. By comparing the spectral and timing characteristics of the source in the two years before the outburst and after the BAT event, we find that, besides a change in luminosity and spectral shape, also the 6.67 hr pulsed profile has significantly changed with a clear phase shift with respect to its low-flux profile. The UV/optical/NIR observations did not reveal any counterpart at the position of 1E161348-5055. Based on these findings, we associate the BAT burst with 1E161348-5055, we classify it as a magnetar, and pinpoint the 6.67 hr periodicity as the magnetar spin period.
  • One of the most exciting near-term prospects in physics is the potential discovery of gravitational waves by the advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors. To maximise both the confidence of the detection and the science return, it is essential to identify an electromagnetic counterpart. This is not trivial, as the events are expected to be poorly localised, particularly in the near-term, with error regions covering hundreds or even thousands of square degrees. In this paper we discuss the prospects for finding an X-ray counterpart to a gravitational wave trigger with the Swift X-ray Telescope, using the assumption that the trigger is caused by a binary neutron star merger which also produces a short gamma-ray burst. We show that it is beneficial to target galaxies within the GW error region, highlighting the need for substantially complete galaxy catalogues out to distances of 300 Mpc. We also show that nearby, on-axis short GRBs are either extremely rare, or are systematically less luminous than those detected to date. We consider the prospects for detecting afterglow emission from an an off-axis GRB which triggered the GW facilities, finding that the detectability, and the best time to look, are strongly dependent on the characteristics of the burst such as circumburst density and our viewing angle.
  • GRB 130925A was an unusual GRB, consisting of 3 distinct episodes of high-energy emission spanning $\sim$20 ks, making it a member of the proposed category of `ultra-long' bursts. It was also unusual in that its late-time X-ray emission observed by Swift was very soft, and showed a strong hard-to-soft spectral evolution with time. This evolution, rarely seen in GRB afterglows, can be well modelled as the dust-scattered echo of the prompt emission, with stringent limits on the contribution from the normal afterglow (i.e. external shock) emission. We consider and reject the possibility that GRB 130925A was some form of tidal disruption event, and instead show that if the circumburst density around GRB 130925A is low, the long duration of the burst and faint external shock emission are naturally explained. Indeed, we suggest that the ultra-long GRBs as a class can be explained as those with low circumburst densities, such that the deceleration time (at which point the material ejected from the nascent black hole is decelerated by the circumburst medium) is $\sim$20 ks, as opposed to a few hundred seconds for the normal long GRBs. The increased deceleration radius means that more of the ejected shells can interact before reaching the external shock, naturally explaining both the increased duration of GRB 130925A, the duration of its prompt pulses, and the fainter-than-normal afterglow.
  • Supernova (SN) explosions are crucial engines driving the evolution of galaxies by shock heating gas, increasing the metallicity, creating dust, and accelerating energetic particles. In 2012 we used the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array to observe SN 1987A, one of the best-observed supernovae since the invention of the telescope. We present spatially resolved images at 450um, 870um, 1.4mm, and 2.8mm, an important transition wavelength range. Longer wavelength emission is dominated by synchrotron radiation from shock-accelerated particles, shorter wavelengths by emission from the largest mass of dust measured in a supernova remnant (>0.2Msun). For the first time we show unambiguously that this dust has formed in the inner ejecta (the cold remnants of the exploded star's core). The dust emission is concentrated to the center of the remnant, so the dust has not yet been affected by the shocks. If a significant fraction survives, and if SN 1987A is typical, supernovae are important cosmological dust producers.
  • GRB 110918A is the brightest long GRB detected by Konus-WIND during its 19 years of continuous observations and the most luminous GRB ever observed since the beginning of the cosmological era in 1997. We report on the final IPN localization of this event and its detailed multiwavelength study with a number of space-based instruments. The prompt emission is characterized by a typical duration, a moderare $E_{peak}$ of the time-integrated spectrum, and strong hard-to-soft evolution. The high observed energy fluence yields, at z=0.984, a huge isotropic-equivalent energy release $E_{iso}=(2.1\pm0.1)\times10^{54}$ erg. The record-breaking energy flux observed at the peak of the short, bright, hard initial pulse results in an unprecedented isotropic-equivalent luminosity $L_{iso}=(4.7\pm0.2)\times10^{54}$erg s$^{-1}$. A tail of the soft gamma-ray emission was detected with temporal and spectral behavior typical of that predicted by the synchrotron forward-shock model. Swift/XRT and Swift/UVOT observed the bright afterglow from 1.2 to 48 days after the burst and revealed no evidence of a jet break. The post-break scenario for the afterglow is preferred from our analysis, with a hard underlying electron spectrum and ISM-like circumburst environment implied. We conclude that, among multiple reasons investigated, the tight collimation of the jet must have been a key ingredient to produce this unusually bright burst. The inferred jet opening angle of 1.7-3.4 deg results in reasonable values of the collimation-corrected radiated energy and the peak luminosity, which, however, are still at the top of their distributions for such tightly collimated events. We estimate a detection horizon for a similar ultraluminous GRB of $z\sim7.5$ for Konus-WIND, and $z\sim12$ for Swift/BAT, which stresses the importance of GRBs as probes of the early Universe.
  • We present the 1SXPS (Swift-XRT Point Source) catalog of 151,524 X-ray point-sources detected by the Swift-XRT in 8 years of operation. The catalog covers 1905 square degrees distributed approximately uniformly on the sky. We analyze the data in two ways. First we consider all observations individually, for which we have a typical sensitivity of ~3e-13 erg/cm2/s (0.3--10 keV). Then we co-add all data covering the same location on the sky: these images have a typical sensitivity of ~9e-14 erg/cm2/s (0.3--10 keV). Our sky coverage is nearly 2.5 times that of 3XMM-DR4, although the catalog is a factor of ~1.5 less sensitive. The median position error is 5.5" (90% confidence), including systematics. Our source detection method improves on that used in previous XRT catalogs and we report >68,000 new X-ray sources. The goals and observing strategy of the Swift satellite allow us to probe source variability on multiple timescales, and we find ~30,000 variable objects in our catalog. For every source we give positions, fluxes, time series (in four energy bands and two hardness ratios), estimates of the spectral properties, spectra and spectral fits for the brightest sources, and variability probabilities in multiple energy bands and timescales.
  • We present Swift follow-up observations of a sample of 35 unclassified faint X-ray sources drawn from the ASCA Galactic centre and plane surveys. Our short pointed XRT observations allow detections down to a limiting 0.3-10 keV flux of ~1E-13 erg cm-2 s-1, which translates into a luminosity of ~1E33 erg s-1 for an assumed distance of D=8 kpc. The brightest source in our sample reaches a maximum 0.3-10 keV luminosity of ~2E36 (D/8kpc)^2 erg s-1 during our observations. We detect 16 (46%) of the ASCA sources with the XRT, while 19 were not detected during our program. Since we are probing the faint end of the ASCA source populations, we expect a large fraction of the non-detections to be due to the Eddington bias. This is strengthened by the fact that we find the observed XRT count rates to be predominantly lower than expected based on the reported ASCA intensities. Investigation of the ASCA properties and long-term X-ray variability leads us to conclude that the non-detections likely include two spurious ASCA detections and three objects that are variable or transient X-ray sources. For the 16 XRT-detected sources we obtain positional accuracies of ~2-4", which significantly improves upon their ASCA uncertainties of ~1'. We use the X-ray spectra and variability to characterise these objects. Most appear to be faint, persistent X-ray emitters that have highly absorbed spectra. Based on their X-ray properties we identify three accreting compact objects: one confirmed (AX J1754.2-2754) and one candidate (AX J1538.3-5541) X-ray binary, and one possible magnetically accreting white dwarf (AX J1620.1-5002). Furthermore, we use the improved positions of XRT-detected sources to search for counterparts in simultaneously obtained Swift/UVOT images and possible associations with cataloged sources at various wavelengths. This reveals three possible main sequence stars amongst our sample.
  • Swift X-ray observations of the ~60 day super-soft phase of the recurrent nova RS Ophiuchi 2006 show the progress of nuclear burning on the white dwarf in exquisite detail. First seen 26 days after the optical outburst, this phase started with extreme variability likely due to variable absorption, although intrinsic white dwarf variations are not excluded. About 32 days later, a steady decline in count-rate set in. NLTE model atmosphere spectral fits during the super-soft phase show that the effective temperature of the white dwarf increases from ~65 eV to ~90 eV during the extreme variability phase, falling slowly after about day 60 and more rapidly after day 80. The bolometric luminosity is seen to be approximately constant and close to Eddington from day 45 up to day 60, the subsequent decline possibly signalling the end of extensive nuclear burning. Before the decline, a multiply-periodic, ~35 s modulation of the soft X-rays was present and may be the signature of a nuclear fusion driven instability. Our measurements are consistent with a white dwarf mass near the Chandrasekhar limit; combined with a deduced accumulation of mass transferred from its binary companion, this leads us to suggest RS Oph is a strong candidate for a future supernova explosion. The main uncertainty now is whether the WD is the CO type necessary for a SN Ia. This may be confirmed by detailed abundance analyses of spectroscopic data from the outbursts.
  • We report the Swift discovery of nearby long, soft gamma-ray burst GRB 100316D, and the subsequent unveiling of its low redshift host galaxy and associated supernova. We derive the redshift of the event to be z = 0.0591 +/- 0.0001 and provide accurate astrometry for the GRB-SN. We study the extremely unusual prompt emission with time-resolved gamma-ray to X-ray spectroscopy, and find that the spectrum is best modelled with a thermal component in addition to a synchrotron emission component with a low peak energy. The X-ray light curve has a remarkably shallow decay out to at least 800 s. The host is a bright, blue galaxy with a highly disturbed morphology and we use Gemini South, VLT and HST observations to measure some of the basic host galaxy properties. We compare and contrast the X-ray emission and host galaxy of GRB 100316D to a subsample of GRB-SNe. GRB 100316D is unlike the majority of GRB-SNe in its X-ray evolution, but resembles rather GRB 060218, and we find that these two events have remarkably similar high energy prompt emission properties. Comparison of the host galaxies of GRB-SNe demonstrates, however, that there is a great diversity in the environments in which GRB-SNe can be found. GRB 100316D is an important addition to the currently sparse sample of spectroscopically confirmed GRB-SNe, from which a better understanding of long GRB progenitors and the GRB--SN connection can be gleaned.
  • The majority of short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) are thought to originate from the merger of compact binary systems collapsing directly to form a black hole. However, it has been proposed that both SGRBs and long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) may, on rare occasions, form an unstable millisecond pulsar (magnetar) prior to final collapse. GRB 090515, detected by the Swift satellite was extremely short, with a T_90 of 0.036 +/- 0.016 s, and had a very low fluence of 2 x 10^-8 erg cm^-2 and faint optical afterglow. Despite this, the 0.3 - 10 keV flux in the first 200 s was the highest observed for a SGRB by the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT). The X-ray light curve showed an unusual plateau and steep decay, becoming undetectable after ~500 s. This behaviour is similar to that observed in some long bursts proposed to have magnetars contributing to their emission. In this paper, we present the Swift observations of GRB 090515 and compare it to other gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in the Swift sample. Additionally, we present optical observations from Gemini, which detected an afterglow of magnitude 26.4 +/- 0.1 at T+ 1.7 hours after the burst. We discuss potential causes of the unusual 0.3 - 10 keV emission and suggest it might be energy injection from an unstable millisecond pulsar. Using the duration and flux of the plateau of GRB 090515, we place constraints on the millisecond pulsar spin period and magnetic field.
  • On 2010 March 19, the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope triggered on a short burst with temporal and spectral characteristics similar to those of Soft Gamma Repeater (SGR) bursts. The source location, however, did not coincide with any known SGR. Subsequent observations of the source error box with the Swift/X-ray Telescope and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) led to the discovery of a new X-ray source, with a spin period of 7.56 s, confirming SGR J1833-0832 as a new magnetar. Based on our detailed temporal and spectral analyses, we show that the new SGR is rapidly spinning down (4 x 10^{-12} s/s) and find an inferred dipole magnetic field of 1.8 x 10^{14} G. We also show that the X-ray flux of SGR J1833-0832 remained constant for approximately 20 days following the burst and then started to decline. We derived an accurate location of the source with the Chandra X-ray Observatory and we searched for a counterpart in deep optical and infrared observations of SGR J1833-0832, and for radio pulsed emission with the Westerbork Radio Synthesis Telescope. Finally, we compare the spectral and temporal properties of the source to the other magnetar candidates.
  • Context: Gamma Ray Burst models predict the broadband spectral evolution and the temporal evolution of the energy flux. In contrast, standard data analysis tools and data repositories provide count-rate data, or use single flux conversion factors for all of the data, neglecting spectral evolution. Aims: To produce Swift BAT and XRT light curves in flux units, where the spectral evolution is accounted for. Methods: We have developed software to use the hardness ratio information to track spectral evolution of GRBs, and thus to convert the count-rate light curves from the BAT and XRT instruments on Swift into accurate, evolution-aware flux light curves. Results: The Swift Burst Analyser website (http://www.swift.ac.uk/burst_analyser) contains BAT, XRT and combined BAT-XRT flux light curves in three energy regimes for all GRBs observed by the Swift satellite. These light curves are automatically built and updated when data become available, are presented in graphical and plain-text format, and are available for download and use in research.
  • Swift captured for the first time a smoothly rising X-ray re-brightening of clear non-flaring origin after the steep decay in a long gamma-ray burst (GRB): GRB081028. A rising phase is likely present in all GRBs but is usually hidden by the prompt tail emission and constitutes the first manifestation of what is later to give rise to the shallow decay phase. Contemporaneous optical observations reveal a rapid evolution of the injection frequency of a fast cooling synchrotron spectrum through the optical band, which disfavours the afterglow onset (start of the forward shock emission along our line of sight when the outflow is decelerated) as the origin of the observed re-brightening. We investigate alternative scenarios and find that the observations are consistent with the predictions for a narrow jet viewed off-axis. The high on-axis energy budget implied by this interpretation suggests different physical origins of the prompt and (late) afterglow emission. Strong spectral softening takes place from the prompt to the steep decay phase: we track the evolution of the spectral peak energy from the gamma-rays to the X-rays and highlight the problems of the high latitude and adiabatic cooling interpretations. Notably, a softening of both the high and low spectral slopes with time is also observed. We discuss the low on-axis radiative efficiency of GRB081028 comparing its properties against a sample of Swift long GRBs with secure E_gamma,iso measurements.
  • We present a homogeneous X-ray analysis of all 318 Gamma Ray Bursts detected by the X-ray Telescope on the Swift satellite up to 2008 July 23; this represents the largest sample of X-ray GRB data published to date. In Sections 2--3 we detail the methods which the Swift-XRT team has developed to produce the enhanced positions, light curves, hardness ratios and spectra presented in this paper. Software using these methods continues to create such products for all new GRBs observed by the Swift-XRT. We also detail web-based tools allowing users to create these products for any object observed by the XRT, not just GRBs. In Sections 4--6 we present the results of our analysis of GRBs, including probability distribution functions of the temporal and spectral properties of the sample. We demonstrate evidence for a consistent underlying behaviour which can produce a range of light curve morphologies, and attempt to interpret this behaviour in the framework of external forward shock emission. We find several difficulties, in particular that reconciliation of our data with the forward shock model requires energy injection to continue for days to weeks.
  • We propose a new method for the classification of optically dark gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), based on the X-ray and optical-to-X-ray spectral indices of GRB afterglows, and utilizing the spectral capabilities of Swift. This method depends less on model assumptions than previous methods, and can be used as a quick diagnostic tool to identify optically sub-luminous bursts. With this method we can also find GRBs that are extremely bright at optical wavelengths. We show that the previously suggested correlation between the optical darkness and the X-ray/gamma-ray brightness is merely an observational selection effect.
  • We report the discovery by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope of high-energy gamma-ray (GeV) emission from the flat-spectrum radio quasar PKS 1454-354 (z=1.424). On 4 September 2008 the source rose to a peak flux of (3.5 +/- 0.7)x 10^-6 ph cm^-2 s^-1 (E > 100 MeV) on a time scale of hours and then slowly dropped over the following two days. No significant spectral changes occurred during the flare. Fermi/LAT observations also showed that PKS 1454-354 is the most probable counterpart of the unidentified EGRET source 3EG J1500-3509. Multiwavelength measurements performed during the following days (7 September with Swift; 6-7 September with the ground-based optical telescope ATOM; 13 September with the Australia Telescope Compact Array) resulted in radio, optical, UV and X-ray fluxes greater than archival data, confirming the activity of PKS 1454-354.
  • The aim of this paper is to investigate the environment of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) and the interstellar matter of their host galaxies. We use to this purpose high resolution spectroscopic observations of the afterglow of GRB050922C, obtained with UVES/VLT 3.5 hours after the GRB event. We found that, as for most high resolution spectra of GRBs, the spectrum of the afterglow of GRB050922C is complex. At least seven components contribute to the main absorption system at z=2.1992. The detection of lines of neutral elements like MgI and the detection of fine-structure levels of the ions FeII, SiII and CII allows us to separate components in the GRB ISM along the line of sight. Moreover, in addition to the main system, we have analyzed the five intervening systems between z = 2.077 and z = 1.5664 identified along the GRB line of sight. GRB afterglow spectra are very complex, but full of information. This can be used to disentangle the contribution of the different parts of the GRB host galaxy and to study their properties. Our metallicity estimates agree with the scenario of GRBs exploding in low metallicity galaxies
  • Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXTs) are a sub-class of High Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs) associated with OB supergiant companions and displaying transient X-ray activity. This behaviour is quite surprising since HMXBs hosting supergiants were known to be persistent sources, until the INTEGRAL discoveries obtained by means of the monitoring of the Galactic plane. We have been performing a monitoring campaign with Swift of four SFXTs with the main aim of characterizing both the long-term behaviour of these transients and the properties during bright outbursts. Here we discuss the properties of the X-ray emission observed outside the outbursts as well as the flares observed from two SFXTs: IGRJ17544-2916 and XTEJ1739-302. Contrarily to what previously thought, Swift allowed us to discover that SFXTs spend most of the time in accretion at a low level, even outside the bright outbursts, with an accretion luminosity of 1E33-1E34 erg/s, and that the quiescent level at ~1E32 erg/s is a much rarer state.
  • We report on the detection by Swift of GRB 080913, and subsequent optical/near-infrared follow-up observations by GROND which led to the discovery of its optical/NIR afterglow and the recognition of its high-z nature via the detection of a spectral break between the i' and z' bands. Spectroscopy obtained at the ESO-VLT revealed a continuum extending down to lambda = 9400 A, and zero flux for 7500 A < lambda<9400 A, which we interpret as the onset of a Gunn-Peterson trough at z=6.695+-0.025 (95.5% conf. level), making GRB 080913 the highest redshift GRB to date, and more distant than the highest-redshift QSO. We note that many redshift indicators which are based on promptly available burst or afterglow properties have failed for GRB 080913. We report on our follow-up campaign and compare the properties of GRB 080913 with bursts at lower redshift. In particular, since the afterglow of this burst is fainter than typical for GRBs, we show that 2m-class telescopes can identify most high-redshift GRBs.
  • IGR J08408-4503 is a supergiant fast X-ray transient discovered in 2006 with a confirmed association with a O8.5Ib(f) supergiant star, HD 74194. We report on the analysis of two outbursts caught by Swift/BAT on 2006 October 4 and 2008 July 5, and followed up at softer energies with Swift/XRT. The 2008 XRT light curve shows a multiple-peaked structure with an initial bright flare that reached a flux of ~1E-9 erg/cm2/s (2-10 keV), followed by two equally bright flares within 75 ks. The spectral characteristics of the flares differ dramatically, with most of the difference, as derived via time-resolved spectroscopy, being due to absorbing column variations. We observe a gradual decrease of the NH, derived with a fit using absorbed power law model, as time passes. We interpret these NH variations as due to an ionization effect produced by the first flare, resulting in a significant decrease in the measured column density towards the source. The durations of the flares, as well as the times of the outbursts suggest that the orbital period is ~35 days, if the flaring activity is interpreted within the framework of the Sidoli et al 2007 model with the outbursts triggered by the neutron star passage inside an equatorial wind inclined with respect to the orbital plane.
  • Since GRBs fade rapidly, it is important to publish accurate, precise positions at early times. For Swift-detected bursts, the best promptly available position is most commonly the X-ray Telescope (XRT) position. We present two processes, developed by the Swift team at Leicester, which are now routinely used to improve the precision and accuracy of the XRT positions reported by the Swift team. Both methods, which are fully automated, make use of a PSF-fitting approach which accounts for the bad columns on the CCD. The first method yields positions with 90% error radii <4.4" 90% of the time, within 10--20 minutes of the trigger. The second method astrometrically corrects the position using UVOT field stars and the known mapping between the XRT and UVOT detectors, yielding enhanced positions with 90% error radii of <2.8" 90% of the time, usually ~2 hours after the trigger.
  • The origins of Gamma-ray Burst prompt emission are currently not well understood and in this context long, well-observed events are particularly important to study. We present the case of GRB 070616, analysing the exceptionally long-duration multipeaked prompt emission, and later afterglow, captured by all the instruments on-board Swift and by Suzaku WAM. The high energy light curve remained generally flat for several hundred seconds before going into a steep decline. Spectral evolution from hard to soft is clearly taking place throughout the prompt emission, beginning at 285 s after the trigger and extending to 1200 s. We track the movement of the spectral peak energy, whilst observing a softening of the low energy spectral slope. The steep decline in flux may be caused by a combination of this strong spectral evolution and the curvature effect. We investigate origins for the spectral evolution, ruling out a superposition of two power laws and considering instead an additional component dominant during the late prompt emission. We also discuss origins for the early optical emission and the physics of the afterglow. The case of GRB 070616 clearly demonstrates that both broadband coverage and good time resolution are crucial to pin down the origins of the complex prompt emission in GRBs.
  • We report on the temporal and spectral characteristics of the early X-ray emission from the GRB 050822 as observed by Swift. This burst is likely to be an XRF showing major X-ray flares in its XRT light-curve. The quality of the data allows a detailed spectral analysis of the early afterglow in the X-ray band. During the X-ray flares, a positive correlation between the count rate and the spectral hardness (i.e. the higher the count rate, the harder the spectrum) is clearly seen for the X-ray flares. This behaviour, similar to that seen for Gamma-ray pulses, indicates that the energy peak of the spectrum is in the XRT energy band and it moves towards lower energies with time. We show evidence for the possible detection of the emergence of the forward-shock emission, produced at a radius larger than 4x10^16 cm in the case of a CBM afterglow model (a formation region clearly different from that producing the prompt emission). Finally, we show that the null detection of a jet break up to T_0 + 4x10^6 s in the X-ray light curve of this XRF can be understood: i) if the jet seen on-axis is uniform with a large opening angle theta > 20 degrees); or ii) if the jet is a structured Gaussian-like jet with the line-of-sight outside the bright Gaussian core.
  • GRB 060614 is a remarkable GRB observed by Swift with puzzling properties, which challenge current progenitor models. The lack of any bright SN down to very strict limits and the vanishing spectral lags are typical of short GRBs, strikingly at odds with the long (102s) duration of this event. Here we present spectral and temporal analysis of the Swift observations. We show that the burst presents standard optical, UV and X-ray afterglows. An achromatic break is observed simultaneously in optical and X-rays, at a time consistent with the break in the R-band light curve measured by the VLT. The achromatic behaviour and the consistent post-break decay slopes make GRB 060614 one of the best examples of a jet break for a Swift burst. The optical, UV and X-rays afterglow light curves have also an earlier break at ~30 ks. In the optical, there is strong spectral evolution around this break, suggesting the passage of a break frequency through the optical/UV band. The very blue spectrum at early times and the trend in the light curves (rising at low frequencies, and decaying at higher energies) suggest this may be the injection frequency. The early X-ray light curve is well interpreted as the X-ray counterpart of the burst extended emission. Spectral analysis of BAT/XRT data in the 80s overlap time show that the Ep of the burst has decreased to as low as 8keV at the beginning of the XRT observation. The Ep continues to decrease through the XRT energy band and exits it at about 500s after the trigger. The average Ep of the burst is likely < 24 keV but larger than 8 keV. The initial peak observed by BAT is however distinctly harder than the rest with Ep ~300 keV as measured by Konus Wind. Considering the time-averaged spectral properties, GRB 060614 is consistent with the Eiso-Ep_rest, Egamma-Ep_rest, and Liso-Ep correlations.