• We have obtained high-resolution spectroscopy of ten red giants in the Carina dwarf spheroidal (dSph) with UVES at the ESO/VLT. Here we present the abundances of O,Na,Mg,Si,Ca,Ti and Fe. By comparing the iron abundances [Fe/H] with calcium triplet (CaT) metallicities we show that the empirical CaT technique yields good agreement with the high-resolution data for [Fe/H]>-2 dex, but tends to deviate at lower metallicities. We identify two metal poor stars with iron abundances of -2.72 and -2.50 dex. These stars are found to have enhanced [alpha/Fe] ratios similar to those of stars in the Milky Way halo. However, the bulk of the Carina red giants are depleted in the [alpha/Fe] abundance ratios with respect to the Galactic halo at a given metallicity. One of our targets, with a [Fe/H] of -1.5 dex, is considerably depleted in almost all of the alpha-elements by ~0.5 dex compared to the solar values. Such a low [alpha/Fe] can be produced by stochastical fluctuations in terms of an incomplete mixing of single Type Ia and II SNe events into the ISM. Our derived element ratios are consistent with the episodic and extended SF in Carina known from its color-magnitude diagram. We find a considerable star-to-star scatter in the abundance ratios. This suggests that Carina's SF history varies with position within the galaxy, with incomplete mixing. Alternatively, the SF rate is so low that the high-mass stellar IMF is sparsely populated, as statistically expected in low-mass star clusters, leading to real scatter in the resultant mass-integrated yields. Both ideas are consistent with slow stochastic SF in dissolving associations, so that one may not speak of a single SF history at a detailed level (Abridged).
  • We present multi-wavelength observations of stellar features in the HI tidal bridge connecting M81 and M82 in the region called Arp's Loop. We identify eight young star-forming regions from Galaxy Evolution Explorer ultraviolet observations. Four of these objects are also detected at H\alpha. We determine the basic star formation history of Arp's Loop using F475W and F814W images obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We find both a young (< 10 Myr) and an old (>1 Gyr) stellar population with a similar spatial distribution and a metallicity Z~0.004. We suggest that the old stellar population was formed in the stellar disk of M82 and/or M81 and ejected into the intergalactic medium during a tidal passage (~ 200-300 Myr ago), whereas the young UV-bright stars have formed in the tidal debris. The UV luminosities of the eight objects are modest and typical of small clusters or OB associations. The tidal bridge between M81-M82 therefore appears to be intermediate between the very low levels of star formation seen in the Magellanic bridge and actively star-forming tidal tails associated with major galaxy mergers.
  • We present the projected velocity dispersion profile for the remote (d=233kpc) Galactic dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy Leo II, based on 171 discrete stellar radial velocities that were obtained from medium-resolution spectroscopy using the FLAMES/GIRAFFE spectrograph at the European Southern Observatory, Chile. The dispersion profile of those stars with good membership probabilities is essentially flat with an amplitude of 6.6+-0.7 km/s over the full radial extent of our data, which probe to the stellar boundary of this galaxy. We find no evidence of any significant apparent rotation or velocity asymmetry which suggests that tidal effects cannot be invoked to explain Leo II's properties. From basic mass modeling, employing Jeans' equation, we derive a mass out to the limiting radius of (2.7+-0.5) 10^7 Msun and a global mass to light ratio of 27-45 in solar units, depending on the adopted total luminosity. A cored halo profile and a mild amount of tangential velocity anisotropy is found to account well for Leo II's observed kinematics, although we cannot exclude the possibility of a cusped halo with radially varying velocity anisotropy. All in all, this galaxy exhibits dark matter properties which appear to be concordant with the other dSph satellites of the Milky Way, namely a halo mass profile which is consistent with a central core and a total mass which is similar to the common mass scale seen in other dSphs.
  • We present metallicities and ages for 52 red giants in the remote Galactic dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy Leo II. These stars cover the entire surface area of Leo II and are radial velocity members. We obtained medium-resolution multi-fiber spectroscopy with ESO/VLT's FLAMES spectrograph. The metallicities were determined based on the near-infrared Ca II triplet. The resulting metallicity distribution (MD) is asymmetric and peaks at [Fe/H]=-1.74 dex on the Carretta & Gratton scale. The full range in metallicities extends from -2.4 to -1.1 dex. As in other dSphs, no extremely metal-poor red giants were found. We compare Leo II's observed MD with model predictions for several other Galactic dSphs from the literature. Leo II clearly exhibits a lack of more metal poor stars, in analogy to the classical G-dwarf problem, which may indicate a comparable `K-giant problem'. Moreover, its evolution appears to have been affected by galactic winds. We use our inferred metallicities as an input parameter for isochrone fits to SDSS photometry and derive approximate ages. The resulting age-metallicity distribution covers the full age range from 2-15 Gyr on our adopted isochrone scale. During the first 7 Gyr relative to the oldest stars [Fe/H] appears to have remained almost constant. The almost constant metallicity at higher ages and a slight drop by about 0.3 dex thereafter may be indicative of rejuvenation by low metallicity gas. Overall, the age-metallicity relation appears to support the formation of Leo II from pre-enriched gas. Evidence for enrichment is seen during the recent 2-4 Gyr. Our findings support earlier photometric findings of Leo II as a galaxy with a prominent old and a dominant intermediate-age population. We do not find a significant radial metallicity gradient nor age gradient in our data.(Abridged)