• We present 33 GHz imaging for 112 pointings towards galaxy nuclei and extranuclear star-forming regions at $\approx$2" resolution using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) as part of the Star Formation in Radio Survey. A comparison with 33 GHz Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope single-dish observations indicates that the interferometric VLA observations recover $78\pm4 %$ of the total flux density over 25" regions ($\approx$ kpc-scales) among all fields. On these scales, the emission being resolved out is most likely diffuse non-thermal synchrotron emission. Consequently, on the $\approx30-300$ pc scales sampled by our VLA observations, the bulk of the 33 GHz emission is recovered and primarily powered by free-free emission from discrete HII regions, making it an excellent tracer of massive star formation. Of the 225 discrete regions used for aperture photometry, 162 are extranuclear (i.e., having galactocentric radii $r_{\rm G} \geq 250$ pc) and detected at $>3\sigma$ significance at 33 GHz and in H$\alpha$. Assuming a typical 33 GHz thermal fraction of 90 %, the ratio of optically-thin 33 GHz-to-uncorrected H$\alpha$ star formation rates indicate a median extinction value on $\approx30-300$ pc scales of $A_{\rm H\alpha} \approx 1.26\pm0.09$ mag with an associated median absolute deviation of 0.87 mag. We find that 10 % of these sources are "highly embedded" (i.e., $A_{\rm H\alpha}\gtrsim3.3$ mag), suggesting that on average HII regions remain embedded for $\lesssim1$ Myr. Finally, we find the median 33 GHz continuum-to-H$\alpha$ line flux ratio to be statistically larger within $r_{\rm G}<250$ pc relative the outer-disk regions by a factor of $1.82\pm0.39$, while the ratio of 33 GHz-to-24 $\mu$m flux densities are lower by a factor of $0.45\pm0.08$, which may suggest increased extinction in the central regions.
  • We present high spatial resolution (1.2") mm-interferometric observations of the CO(2-1) line emission in the central 300pc of the late-type spiral galaxy IC342. The data, obtained with the Owens Valley Radio Observatory, allow first-time detection of a molecular gas disk that coincides with the luminous young stellar cluster in the nucleus of IC342. The nuclear CO disk has a diameter of ~30pc and a molecular gas mass of M(H2) ~ 2x10^5 M_sun. It connects via two faint CO bridges to the well-known, 100pc diameter circumnuclear gas ring. Analysis of the gas kinematics shows that the line-of-nodes in the inner 15pc is offset by about 45degree from the major kinematic axis, indicating non-circular motion of the gas within a few parsec of the dynamical center of IC342. Both the morphology and the kinematics of the CO gas indicate ongoing inflow of molecular gas into the central few parsec of IC342. We infer a gas inflow rate between 0.003 and 0.14 M_sun/yr, based on the observed surface density of the nuclear gas disk and estimates of the radial velocities of the surrounding gas. Inflow rates of this order can support repetitive star formation events in the nucleus of IC342 on timescales much smaller than a Hubble time.
  • We report subarcsecond-resolution VLA and Keck mid-infrared imaging of the dwarf starburst galaxy II Zw 40. II Zw 40 contains a bright, compact thermal radio and infrared source with all the characteristics of a collection of dense HII regions ionized by at least 14,000 O stars. The supernebula is revealed to be multiple sources within an envelope of weaker emission. The radio emission is dominated by free-free emission at 2cm, and the spectrum of this emission appears to be rising. This suggests that the free-free emission is optically thick at 2cm, and that the individual HII regions are ~1pc in size. This complex of "supernebulae" dominates the total infrared luminosity of II Zw 40, although the radio source is less than ~150pc in diameter. Multiple super star clusters appear to be forming here, the much larger analogues of large Galactic HII region complexes.