• We present our ALMA Cycle 4 measurements of the [CII] emission line and the underlying far-infrared (FIR) continuum emission from four optically low-luminosity ($M_{\rm 1450} > -25$) quasars at $z \gtrsim 6$ discovered by the Subaru Hyper Suprime Cam (HSC) survey. The [CII] line and FIR continuum luminosities lie in the ranges $L_{\rm [CII]} = (3.8-10.2) \times 10^8~L_\odot$ and $L_{\rm FIR} = (1.2-2.0) \times 10^{11}~L_\odot$, which are at least one order of magnitude smaller than those of optically-luminous quasars at $z \gtrsim 6$. We estimate the star formation rates (SFR) of our targets as $\simeq 23-40~M_\odot ~{\rm yr}^{-1}$. Their line and continuum-emitting regions are marginally resolved, and found to be comparable in size to those of optically luminous quasars, indicating that their SFR or likely gas mass surface densities (key controlling parameter of mass accretion) are accordingly different. The $L_{\rm [CII]}/L_{\rm FIR}$ ratios of the hosts, $\simeq (2.2-8.7) \times 10^{-3}$, are fully consistent with local star-forming galaxies. Using the [CII] dynamics, we derived their dynamical masses within a radius of 1.5-2.5 kpc as $\simeq (1.4-8.2) \times 10^{10}~M_\odot$. By interpreting these masses as stellar ones, we suggest that these faint quasar hosts are on or even below the star-forming main sequence at $z \sim 6$, i.e., they appear to be transforming into quiescent galaxies. This is in contrast to the optically luminous quasars at those redshifts, which show starburst-like properties. Finally, we find that the ratios of black hole mass to host galaxy dynamical mass of the most of low-luminosity quasars including the HSC ones are consistent with the local value. The mass ratios of the HSC quasars can be reproduced by a semi-analytical model that assumes merger-induced black hole-host galaxy evolution.
  • We present an initial result from the 12CO (J=1-0) survey of 79 galaxies in 62 local luminous and ultra-luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG and ULIRG) systems obtained using the 45 m telescope at the Nobeyama Radio Observatory. This is the systematic 12CO (J=1-0) survey of the Great Observatories All-sky LIRGs Survey (GOALS) sample. The molecular gas mass of the sample ranges 2.2 x 10^8 - 7.0 x 10^9 Msun within the central several kiloparsecs subtending 15" beam. A method to estimate a size of a CO gas distribution is introduced, which is combined with the total CO flux in the literature. The method is applied to a part of our sample and we find that the median CO radius is 1-4 kpc. From the early stage to the late stage of mergers, we find that the CO size decreases while the median value of the molecular gas mass in the central several kpc region is constant. Our results statistically support a scenario where molecular gas inflows towards the central region from the outer disk, to replenish gas consumed by starburst, and that such a process is common in merging LIRGs.
  • We investigate gas contents of star-forming galaxies associated with protocluster 4C23.56 at z = 2.49 by using the redshifted CO(3-2) and 1.1 mm dust continuum with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. The observations unveil seven CO detections out of 22 targeted H$\alpha$ emitters (HAEs) and four out of 19 in 1.1 mm dust continuum. They have high stellar mass ($M_{\star}>4\times 10^{10}$ $M_{\odot}$) and exhibit a specific star-formation rate typical of main-sequence star forming galaxies at $z\sim2.5$. Different gas mass estimators from CO(3-2) and 1.1 mm yield consistent values for simultaneous detections. The gas mass ($M_{\rm gas}$) and gas fraction ($f_{\rm gas}$) are comparable to those of field galaxies, with $M_{\rm gas}=[0.3, 1.8]\times10^{11} \times (\alpha_{\rm CO}/(4.36\times A(Z)$)) M$_{\odot}$, where $\alpha_{\rm CO}$ is the CO-to-H$_2$ conversion factor and $A(Z)$ the additional correction factor for the metallicity dependence of $\alpha_{\rm CO}$, and $\langle f_{\rm gas}\rangle = 0.53 \pm 0.07$ from CO(3-2). Our measurements place a constraint on the cosmic gas density of high-$z$ protoclusters, indicating the protocluster is characterized by a gas density higher than that of the general fields by an order of magnitude. We found $\rho (H_2)\sim 5 \times 10^9 \,M_{\odot}\,{\rm Mpc^{-3}}$ with the CO(3-2) detections. The five ALMA CO detections occur in the region of highest galaxy surface density, where the density positively correlates with global star-forming efficiency (SFE) and stellar mass. Such correlations imply a potentially critical role of environment on early galaxy evolution at high-z protoclusters, although future observations are necessary for confirmation.
  • We have investigated properties of the interstellar medium in interacting galaxies in early and mid-stage using mapping data of 12CO(1-0) and HI.Assuming the standard CO-H2 conversion factor, we found no difference in molecular gas mass, atomic gas mass, and total gas mass (a sum of atomic and molecular gas mass) between interacting galaxies and isolated galaxies. However, interacting galaxies have a higher global molecular gas fraction, global fmol (a ratio of molecular gas mass to total gas mass averaged over a whole galaxy), than isolated galaxies. The distribution of local molecular gas fraction, local fmol (a ratio of the surface density of molecular gas to that of total gas), is different from the distribution in typical isolated galaxies. By a pixel-to-pixel comparison, isolated spiral galaxies show a gradual increase in local fmol along the surface density of total gas until it is saturated at 1.0, while interacting galaxies show no clear relation. We performed pixel-to-pixel theoretical model fittings varying metallicity and external pressure. According to the model fitting, external pressure can explain the trend of local fmol in the interacting galaxies. Assuming a half of the standard CO-H2 conversion factor for interacting galaxies, the results of pixel-to-pixel theoretical model fitting get worse than adopting the standard conversion factor, although global fmol of interacting galaxies becomes the same as in isolated galaxies. We conclude that external pressure occurs due to the shock prevailing over a whole galaxy or due to collisions between giant molecular clouds. The external pressure accelerates an efficient transition from atomic gas to molecular gas. Regarding chemical time-scale, high local fmol can be achieved at the very early stage of interaction even if shock induced by the collision of galaxies ionises interstellar gas.
  • We present high-resolution (1".0) Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of CO (1-0) and CO (2- 1) rotational transitions toward the nearby IR-luminous merger NGC 1614 supplemented with ALMA archival data of CO (3-2), and CO (6-5) transitions. The CO (6-5) emission arises from the starburst ring (central 590 pc in radius), while the lower-$J$ CO lines are distributed over the outer disk ($\sim$ 3.3 kpc in radius). Radiative transfer and photon dominated region (PDR) modeling reveal that the starburst ring has a single warmer gas component with more intense far-ultraviolet radiation field ($n_{\rm{H_2}}$ $\sim$ 10$^{4.6}$ cm$^{-3}$, $T_{\rm{kin}}$ $\sim$ 42 K, and $G_{\rm{0}}$ $\sim$ 10$^{2.7}$) relative to the outer disk ($n_{\rm{H_2}}$ $\sim$ 10$^{5.1}$ cm$^{-3}$, $T_{\rm{kin}}$ $\sim$ 22 K, and $G_{\rm{0}}$ $\sim$ 10$^{0.9}$). A two-phase molecular interstellar medium with a warm and cold ($>$ 70 K and $\sim$ 19 K) component is also an applicable model for the starburst ring. A possible source for heating the warm gas component is mechanical heating due to stellar feedback rather than PDR. Furthermore, we find evidence for non-circular motions along the north-south optical bar in the lower-$J$ CO images, suggesting a cold gas inflow. We suggest that star formation in the starburst ring is sustained by the bar-driven cold gas inflow, and starburst activities radiatively and mechanically power the CO excitation. The absence of a bright active galactic nucleus can be explained by a scenario that cold gas accumulating on the starburst ring is exhausted as the fuel for star formation, or is launched as an outflow before being able to feed to the nucleus.
  • The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array(ALMA) Band 1 receiver covers the 35-50 GHz frequency band. Development of prototype receivers, including the key components and subsystems has been completed and two sets of prototype receivers were fully tested. We will provide an overview of the ALMA Band 1 science goals, and its requirements and design for use on the ALMA. The receiver development status will also be discussed and the infrastructure, integration, evaluation of fully-assembled band 1 receiver system will be covered. Finally, a discussion of the technical and management challenges encountered will be presented.
  • We present results from a deep 2'x3' (comoving scale of 3.7 Mpc x 5.5 Mpc at z=3) survey at 1.1 mm taken with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the SSA22 field. We observe the core region of a z = 3.09 protocluster, achieving a typical rms sensitivity of 60 micro-Jy/beam at a spatial resolution of 0".7. We detect 18 robust ALMA sources at a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) > 5. Comparison between the ALMA map and a 1.1 mm map taken with the AzTEC camera on the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE) indicates that three submillimeter sources discovered by the AzTEC/ASTE survey are resolved into eight individual submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) by ALMA. At least ten of our 18 ALMA SMGs have spectroscopic redshifts of z = 3.09, placing them in the protocluster. This shows that a number of dusty starburst galaxies are forming simultaneously in the core of the protocluster. The nine brightest ALMA SMGs with SNR > 10 have a median intrinsic angular size of 0".32+0".13-0".06 (2.4+1.0-0.4 physical kpc at z = 3.09), which is consistent with previous size measurements of SMGs in other fields. As expected the source counts show a possible excess compared to the counts in the general fields at S_1.1mm >= 1.0 mJy due to the protocluster. Our contiguous mm mapping highlights the importance of large-scale structures on the formation of dusty starburst galaxies.
  • We report the detection of two CH$_3$OH lines (J$_K$ = 2$_K$-1$_K$ and 3$_K$-2$_K$) between the progenitor's disks ("Overlap") of the mid-stage merging galaxy VV 114 obtained using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Band 3 and Band 4. The detected CH$_3$OH emission show an extended filamentary structure (~ 3 kpc) across the progenitor's disks with relatively large velocity width (FWZI ~ 150 km/s). The emission is only significant in the "overlap" and not detected in the two merging nuclei. Assuming optically-thin emission and local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), we found the CH$_3$OH column density relative to H$_2$ ($X_{\rm CH_3OH}$) peaks at the "Overlap" (~ 8 $\times$ 10$^{-9}$), which is almost an order of magnitude larger than that at the eastern nucleus. We suggest that kpc-scale shocks driven by galaxy-galaxy collision may play an important role to enhance the CH$_3$OH abundance at the "Overlap". This scenario is consistent with that shock-induced large velocity dispersion components of ionized gas have been detected in optical wavelength at the same region. Conversely, low $X_{\rm CH_3OH}$ at the nuclear regions might be attributed to the strong photodissociation by nuclear starbursts and/or putative active galactic nucleus (AGN), or inefficient production of CH$_3$OH on dust grains due to initial high temperature conditions (i.e., desorption of the precursor molecule, CO, into gas-phase before forming CH$_3$OH on dust grains). These ALMA observations demonstrate that CH$_3$OH is a unique tool to address kpc-scale shock-induced gas dynamics and star formation in merging galaxies.
  • We present 1" (<100 pc) resolution maps of millimeter emission from five molecules-CN, HCN, HCO+, CH3OH, and HNCO-obtained towards NGC 4038, which is the northern galaxy of the mid-stage merger, Antennae galaxies, with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. Three molecules (CN, CH3OH, and HNCO) were detected for the first time in the nuclear region of NGC 4038. High-resolution mapping reveals a systematic difference in distributions of different molecular species and continuum emission. Active star forming regions identified by the 3 mm and 850 um continuum emission are offset from the gas-rich region associated with the HCN (1-0) and CO (3-2) peaks. The CN (1-0)/HCN (1-0) line ratios are enhanced (CN/HCN = 0.8-1.2) in the star forming regions, suggesting that the regions are photon dominated. The large molecular gas mass (10^8 Msun) within a 0.6" (~60 pc) radius of the CO (3-2) peak and a high dense gas fraction (>20 %) suggested by the HCN (1-0)/CO (3-2) line ratio may signify a future burst of intense star formation there. The shocked gas traced in the CH3OH and HNCO emission indicates sub-kpc scale molecular shocks. We suggest that the molecular shocks may be driven by collisions between inflowing gas and the central massive molecular complex.
  • We present stacking analyses on our ALMA deep 1.1 mm imaging in the SXDF using 1.6 {\mu}m and 3.6 {\mu}m selected galaxies in the CANDELS WFC3 catalog. We detect a stacked flux of ~0.03-0.05 mJy, corresponding to LIR < 10^11 Lsun and a star formation rate (SFR) of ~ 15 Msun/yr at z = 2. We find that galaxies brighter in the rest-frame near-infrared tend to be also brighter at 1.1 mm, and galaxies fainter than m[3.6um] = 23 do not produce detectable 1.1 mm emission. This suggests a correlation between stellar mass and SFR, but outliers to this correlation are also observed, suggesting strongly boosted star formation or extremely large extinction. We also find tendencies that redder galaxies and galaxies at higher redshifts are brighter at 1.1 mm. Our field contains z ~ 2.5 H-alpha emitters and a bright single-dish source. However, we do not find evidence of bias in our results caused by the bright source. By combining the fluxes of sources detected by ALMA and fluxes of faint sources detected with stacking, we recover a 1.1 mm surface brightness of up to 20.3 +/- 1.2 Jy/deg, comparable to the extragalactic background light measured by COBE. Based on the fractions of optically faint sources in our and previous ALMA studies and the COBE measurements, we find that approximately half of the cosmic star formation may be obscured by dust and missed by deep optical surveys, Much deeper and wider ALMA imaging is therefore needed to better constrain the obscured cosmic star formation history.
  • The central structure in three of the brightest unlensed z=3-4 submillimeter galaxies are investigated through 0.015" - 0.05" (120 -- 360~pc) 860 micron continuum images obtained using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The distribution in the central kpc in AzTEC1 and AzTEC8 are extremely complex, and they are composed of multiple ~200 pc clumps. AzTEC4 consists of two sources that are separated by ~1.5 kpc, indicating a mid-stage merger. The peak star formation rate densities in the central clumps are ~300 - 3000 Msun/yr/kpc^2, suggesting regions with extreme star formation near the Eddington Limit. By comparing the flux obtained by ALMA and Submillimeter Array (SMA), we find that 68-90% of the emission is extended (> 1 kpc) in AzTEC 4 and 8. For AzTEC1, we identify at least 11 additional compact (~200 pc) clumps in the extended 3 - 4 kpc region. Overall, the data presented here suggest that the luminosity surface densities observed at < 150 pc scales are roughly similar to that observed in local ULIRGs, as in the eastern nucleus of Arp 220. Between 10 to 30% of the 860 micron continuum is concentrated in clumpy structures in the central kpc while the remaining flux is distributed over > 1 kpc regions, some of which could also be clumpy. These sources can be explained by a rapid inflow of gas such as a merger of gas-rich galaxies, surrounded by extended and clumpy starbursts. However, the cold mode accretion model is not ruled out.
  • We present the new single dish CO (3-2) emission data obtained toward 19 early stage and 7 late stage nearby merging galaxies using the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE). Combining with the single dish and interferometric data of galaxies observed in previous studies, we investigate the relation between the CO (3-2) luminosity (L'CO(3-2)) and the far Infrared luminosity (LFIR) in a sample of 29 early stage and 31 late stage merging galaxies, and 28 nearby isolated spiral galaxies. We find that normal isolated spiral galaxies and merging galaxies have different slopes (alpha) in the log L'CO(3-2) - log LFIR plane (alpha ~ 0.79 for spirals and ~ 1.12 for mergers). The large slope (alpha > 1) for merging galaxies can be interpreted as an evidence for increasing Star Formation Efficiency (SFE=LFIR/L'CO(3-2)) as a function of LFIR. Comparing our results with sub-kpc scale local star formation and global star-burst activity in the high-z Universe, we find deviations from the linear relationship in the log L'CO(3-2) - log LFIR plane for the late stage mergers and high-z star forming galaxies. Finally, we find that the average SFE gradually increases from isolated galaxies, merging galaxies, and to high-z submillimeter galaxies / quasi-stellar objects (SMGs/QSOs). By comparing our findings with the results from numerical simulations, we suggest; (1) inefficient star-bursts triggered by disk-wide dense clumps occur in the early stage of interaction and (2) efficient star-bursts triggered by central concentration of gas occur in the final stage. A systematic high spatial resolution survey of diffuse and dense gas tracers is a key to confirm this scenario.
  • We report a new 1-pc (30") resolution CS($J=2-1$) line map of the central 30 pc of the Galactic Center (GC), made with the Nobeyama 45m telescope. We revisit our previous study of the extraplanar feature called polar arc (PA), which is a molecular cloud located above SgrA* with a velocity gradient perpendicular to the Galactic plane. We find that the PA can be traced back to the Galactic disk. This provides clues of the launching point of the PA , roughly $6\times10^{6}$ years ago. Implications of the dynamical time scale of the PA might be related to the Galactic Center Lobe (GCL) at parsec scale. Our results suggest that in the central 30 pc of the GC, the feedback from past explosions could alter the orbital path of the molecular gas down to the central tenth of parsec. In the follow-up work of our new CS($J=2-1$) map, we also find that near the systemic velocity, the molecular gas shows an extraplanar hourglass-shaped feature (HG-feature) with a size of $\sim$13 pc. The latitude-velocity diagrams show that the eastern edge of the HG-feature is associated with an expanding bubble B1, $\sim$7 pc away from SgrA*. The dynamical time scale of this bubble is $\sim3\times10^{5}$ years. This bubble is interacting with the 50 km s$^{-1}$ cloud. Part of the molecular gas from the 50 km s$^{-1}$ cloud was swept away by the bubble to $b=-0.2deg$. The western edge of the HG-feature seems to be the molecular gas entrained from the 20 km s$^{-1}$ cloud towards the north of the Galactic disk. Our results suggest a fossil explosion in the central 30 pc of the GC a few 10$^{5}$ years ago.
  • We present results of 12CO(J=2-1) observations toward four massive star-forming galaxies at z~1.4 with the Nobeyama 45~m radio telescope. The galaxies are detected with Spitzer/MIPS in 24 um, Herschel/SPIRE in 250 um, and 350 um and they mostly reside in the main sequence. Their gas-phase metallicities derived with N2 method by using the Ha and [NII]6584 emission lines are near the solar value. CO lines are detected toward three galaxies. The molecular gas masses obtained are (9.6-35) x 10^{10} Msun by adopting the Galactic CO-to-H2 conversion factor and the CO(2-1)/CO(1-0) flux ratio of 3. The dust masses derived with the modified blackbody model (assuming the dust temperature of 35 K and the emissivity index of 1.5) are (2.4-5.4) x 10^{8} Msun. The resulting gas-to-dust ratios (not accounting for HI mass) at z~1.4 are 220-1450, which are several times larger than those in local star-forming galaxies. A dependence of the gas-to-dust ratio on the far-infrared luminosity density is not clearly seen.
  • We report 1.1 mm number counts revealed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey Field (SXDF). The advent of ALMA enables us to reveal millimeter-wavelength number counts down to the faint end without source confusion. However, previous studies are based on the ensemble of serendipitously-detected sources in fields originally targeting different sources and could be biased due to the clustering of sources around the targets. We derive number counts in the flux range of 0.2-2 mJy by using 23 (>=4sigma) sources detected in a continuous 2.0 arcmin$^2$ area of the SXDF. The number counts are consistent with previous results within errors, suggesting that the counts derived from serendipitously-detected sources are not significantly biased, although there could be field-to-field variation due to the small survey area. By using the best-fit function of the number counts, we find that ~40% of the extragalactic background light at 1.1 mm is resolved at S(1.1mm) > 0.2 mJy.
  • The scientific impact of a facility is the most important measure of its success. Monitoring and analysing the scientific return can help to modify and optimise operations and adapt to the changing needs of scientific research. The methodology that we have developed to monitor the scientific productivity of the ALMA Observatory, as well as the first results, are described. We focus on the outcome of the first cycle (Cycle 0) of ALMA Early Science operations. Despite the fact that only two years have passed since the completion of Cycle 0 and operations have already changed substantially, this analysisconfirms the effectiveness of the underlying concepts. We find that ALMA is fulfilling its promise as a transformational facility for the observation of the Universe in the submillimetre.
  • We present the results of Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) 108, 233, 352, and 691 GHz continuum observations and Very Large Array (VLA) 4.81 and 8.36 GHz observations of the nearby luminous merger remnant NGC 1614. By analyzing the beam (1".0 * 1".0) and uv (> 45 k{\lambda}) matched ALMA and VLA maps, we find that the deconvolved source size of lower frequency emission (< 108 GHz) is more compact (420 pc * 380 pc) compared to the higher frequency emission (> 233 GHz) (560 pc * 390 pc), suggesting different physical origins for the continuum emission. Based on an SED model for a dusty starburst galaxy, it is found that the SED can be explained by three components, (1) non-thermal synchrotron emission (traced in the 4.81 and 8.36 GHz continuum), (2) thermal free-free emission (traced in the 108 GHz continuum), and (3) thermal dust emission (traced in the 352 and 691 GHz continuum). We also present the spatially-resolved (sub-kpc scale) Kennicutt-Schmidt relation of NGC 1614. The result suggests a systematically shorter molecular gas depletion time in NGC 1614 (average {\tau}_gas of 49 - 77 Myr and 70 - 226 Myr at the starburst ring and the outer region, respectively) than that of normal disk galaxies (~ 2 Gyr) and a mid-stage merger VV 114 (= 0.1 - 1 Gyr). This implies that the star formation activities in U/LIRGs are efficiently enhanced as the merger stage proceeds, which is consistent with the results from high-resolution numerical merger simulations.
  • We developed a dual-linear-polarization HEMT (High Electron Mobility Transistor) amplifier receiver system of the 45-GHz band (hereafter Z45), and installed it in the Nobeyama 45-m radio telescope. The receiver system is designed to conduct polarization observations by taking the cross correlation of two linearly-polarized components, from which we process full-Stokes spectroscopy. We aim to measure the magnetic field strength through the Zeeman effect of the emission line of CCS ($J_N=4_3-3_2$) toward pre-protostellar cores. A linear-polarization receiver system has a smaller contribution of instrumental polarization components to the Stokes $V$ spectra than that of the circular polarization system, so that it is easier to obtain the Stokes $V$ spectra. The receiver has an RF frequency of 42 $-$ 46 GHz and an intermediate frequency (IF) band of 4$-$8 GHz. The typical noise temperature is about 50 K, and the system noise temperature ranges from 100 K to 150K over the frequency of 42 $-$ 46 GHz. The receiver system is connected to two spectrometers, SAM45 and PolariS. SAM45 is a highly flexible FX-type digital spectrometer with a finest frequency resolution of 3.81 kHz. PolariS is a newly-developed digital spectrometer with a finest frequency resolution of 60 Hz, having a capability to process the full-Stokes spectroscopy. The Half Power Beam Width (HPBW) of the beam was measured to be 37$"$ at 43 GHz. The main beam efficiency of the Gaussian main beam was derived to be 0.72 at 43 GHz. The SiO maser observations show that the beam pattern is reasonably round at about 10 \% of the peak intensity and the side-lobe level was less than 3 \% of the peak intensity. Finally, we present some examples of astronomical observations using Z45.
  • We present ALMA Cycle 1 observations of the central kpc region of the luminous type-1 Seyfert galaxy NGC 7469 with unprecedented high resolution (0.5$"$ $\times$ 0.4$"$ = 165 pc $\times$ 132 pc) at submillimeter wavelengths. Utilizing the wide-bandwidth of ALMA, we simultaneously obtained HCN(4-3), HCO$^+$(4-3), CS(7-6), and partially CO(3-2) line maps, as well as the 860 $\mu$m continuum. The region consists of the central $\sim$ 1$"$ component and the surrounding starburst ring with a radius of $\sim$ 1.5$"$-2.5$"$. Several structures connect these components. Except for CO(3-2), these dense gas tracers are significantly concentrated towards the central $\sim$ 1$"$, suggesting their suitability to probe the nuclear regions of galaxies. Their spatial distribution resembles well those of centimeter and mid-infrared continuum emissions, but it is anti-correlated with the optical one, indicating the existence of dust obscured star formation. The integrated intensity ratios of HCN(4-3)/HCO$^+$(4-3) and HCN(4-3)/CS(7-6) are higher at the AGN position than at the starburst ring, which is consistent to our previous findings (submm-HCN enhancement). However, the HCN(4-3)/HCO$^+$(4-3) ratio at the AGN position of NGC 7469 (1.11$\pm$0.06) is almost half of the corresponding value of the low-luminosity type-1 Seyfert galaxy NGC 1097 (2.0$\pm$0.2), despite the more than two orders of magnitude higher X-ray luminosity of NGC 7469. But the ratio is comparable to that of the close vicinity of the AGN of NGC 1068 ($\sim$ 1.5). Based on these results, we speculate that some other heating mechanisms than X-ray (e.g., mechanical heating due to AGN jet) can contribute significantly for shaping the chemical composition in NGC 1097.
  • We present spatially-resolved properties of molecular gas and dust in a gravitationally-lensed submillimeter galaxy H-ATLAS J090311.6+003906 (SDP.81) at $z=3.042$ revealed by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). We identified 14 molecular clumps in the CO(5-4) line data, all with a spatial scale of $\sim$50-300 pc in the source plane. The surface density of molecular gas ($\Sigma_{\rm H_2}$) and star-formation rate ($\Sigma_{\rm SFR}$) of the clumps are more than three orders of magnitude higher than those found in local spiral galaxies. The clumps are placed in the `burst' sequence in the $\Sigma_{\rm H_2}$-$\Sigma_{\rm SFR}$ plane, suggesting that $z \sim 3$ molecular clumps follow the star-formation law derived for local starburst galaxies. With our gravitational lens model, the positions in the source plane are derived for the molecular clumps, dust clumps, and stellar components identified in the {\sl Hubble Space Telescope} image. The molecular and dust clumps coexist in a similar region over $\sim$2 kpc, while the stellar components are offset at most by $\sim$5 kpc. The molecular clumps have a systematic velocity gradient in the north-south direction, which may indicate a rotating gas disk. One possible scenario is that the components of molecular gas, dust, and stars are distributed in a several-kpc scale rotating disk, and the stellar emission is heavily obscured by dust in the central star-forming region. Alternatively, SDP.81 can be explained by a merging system, where dusty starbursts occur in the region where the two galaxies collide, surrounded by tidal features traced in the stellar components.
  • We report a detailed modeling of a mass profile of a $z = 0.2999$ massive elliptical galaxy using 30 milli-arcsecond resolution 1-mm Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) images of the galaxy-galaxy lensing system SDP.81. The detailed morphology of the lensed multiple images of the $z = 3.042$ infrared-luminous galaxy, which is found to consist of tens of $\lesssim 100$-pc-sized star-forming clumps embedded in a $\sim 2$ kpc disk, are well reproduced by a lensing galaxy modeled by an isothermal ellipsoid with a 400 pc core. The core radius is consistent with that of the visible stellar light, and the mass-to-light ratio of $\sim 2\,M_{\odot}\,L_{\odot}^{-1}$ is comparable to the locally measured value, suggesting that the inner 1 kpc region is dominated by luminous matter. The position of the predicted mass centroid is consistent to within $\simeq 30$ mas with that of a non-thermal source detected with ALMA, which likely traces an active galactic nucleus of the foreground elliptical galaxy. A point source mass of $> 3 \times 10^8\,M_{\odot}$ mimicking a supermassive black hole is required to explain the non-detection of a central image of the background galaxy, although the black hole mass degenerates with the core radius of the elliptical galaxy. The required mass is consistent with that predicted from the well-known correlation between black hole mass and host velocity dispersion. Our analysis demonstrates the power of ALMA imaging of strong gravitational lensing for studying the innermost mass profiles and the central supermassive black hole of distant elliptical galaxies.
  • We present ALMA cycle 0 observations of the molecular gas and dust in the IR-bright mid-stage merger VV114 obtained at 160 - 800 pc resolution. The main aim of this study is to investigate the distribution and kinematics of the cold/warm gas and to quantify the spatial variation of the excitation conditions across the two merging disks. The data contain 10 molecular lines, including the first detection of extranuclear CH3OH emission in interacting galaxies, as well as continuum emission. We map the 12CO(3-2)/12CO(1-0) and the 12CO(1-0)/13CO(1-0) line ratio at 800 pc resolution (in the units of K km/s), and find that these ratios vary from 0.2 - 0.8 and 5 - 50, respectively. Conversely, the 200 pc resolution HCN(4-3)/HCO+(4-3) line ratio shows low values (< 0.5) at a filament across the disks except for the unresolved eastern nucleus which is three times higher (1.34 +/- 0.09). We conclude from our observations and a radiative transfer analysis that the molecular gas in the VV114 system consists of five components with different physical and chemical conditions; i.e., 1) dust-enshrouded nuclear starbursts and/or AGN, 2) wide-spread star forming dense gas, 3) merger-induced shocked gas, 4) quiescent tenuous gas arms without star formation, 5) H2 gas mass of (3.8 +/- 0.7) * 10^7 Msun (assuming a conversion factor of {\alpha}_CO = 0.8 Msun (K km s^-1 pc^2)^-1) at the tip of the southern tidal arm, as a potential site of tidal dwarf galaxy formation.
  • We present high-resolution archival Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) CO J=3-2 and J=6-5 and HCO+ J=4-3 observations and new CARMA CO and 13CO J=1-0 observations of the luminous infrared galaxy NGC 1614. The high-resolution maps show the previously identified ring-like structure while the CO J=3-2 map shows extended emission that traces the extended dusty features. We combined these new observations with previously published Submillimeter Array CO and 13CO J=2-1 observations to constrain the physical conditions of the molecular gas at a resolution of 230 pc using a radiative transfer code and a Bayesian likelihood analysis. At several positions around the central ring-like structure, the molecular gas is cold (20-40 K) and dense (> 10^{3.0} cm^{-3}) . The only region that shows evidence of a second molecular gas component is the "hole" in the ring. The CO-to-13CO abundance ratio is found to be greater than 130, more than twice the local interstellar medium value. We also measure the CO-to-H_{2} conversion factor, alpha_{CO}, to range from 0.9 to 1.5 M_sol (K km/s pc^{2})^{-1}.
  • We present < 1 kpc resolution CO imaging study of 37 optically-selected local merger remnants using new and archival interferometric maps obtained with ALMA, CARMA, SMA and PdBI. We supplement a sub-sample with single-dish measurements obtained at the NRO 45 m telescope for estimating the molecular gas mass (10^7 - 10^11 M_sun), and evaluating the missing flux of the interferometric measurements. Among the sources with robust CO detections, we find that 80 % (24/30) of the sample show kinematical signatures of rotating molecular gas disks (including nuclear rings) in their velocity fields, and the sizes of these disks vary significantly from 1.1 kpc to 9.3 kpc. The size of the molecular gas disks in 54 % of the sources is more compact than the K-band effective radius. These small gas disks may have formed from a past gas inflow that was triggered by a dynamical instability during a potential merging event. On the other hand, the rest (46 %) of the sources have gas disks which are extended relative to the stellar component, possibly forming a late-type galaxy with a central stellar bulge. Our new compilation of observational data suggests that nuclear and extended molecular gas disks are common in the final stages of mergers. This finding is consistent with recent major-merger simulations of gas rich progenitor disks. Finally, we suggest that some of the rotation-supported turbulent disks observed at high redshifts may result from galaxies that have experienced a recent major merger.
  • The Serpens South infrared dark cloud consists of several filamentary ridges, some of which fragment into dense clumps. On the basis of CCS ($J_N=4_3-3_2$), HC$_3$N ($J=5-4$), N$_2$H$^+$ ($J=1-0$), and SiO ($J=2-1, v=0$) observations, we investigated the kinematics and chemical evolution of these filamentary ridges. We find that CCS is extremely abundant along the main filament in the protocluster clump. We emphasize that Serpens South is the first cluster-forming region where extremely-strong CCS emission is detected. The CCS-to-N$_2$H$^+$ abundance ratio is estimated to be about 0.5 toward the protocluster clump, whereas it is about 3 in the other parts of the main filament. We identify six dense ridges with different $V_{\rm LSR}$. These ridges appear to converge toward the protocluster clump, suggesting that the collisions of these ridges may have triggered cluster formation. The collisions presumably happened within a few $\times \ 10^5$ yr because CCS is abundant only in such a short time. The short lifetime agrees with the fact that the number fraction of Class I objects, whose typical lifetime is $0.4 \times \ 10^5$ yr, is extremely high as about 70 percent in the protocluster clump. In the northern part, two ridges appear to have partially collided, forming a V-shape clump. In addition, we detected strong bipolar SiO emission that is due to the molecular outflow blowing out of the protostellar clump, as well as extended weak SiO emission that may originate from the filament collisions.