• We report the first comprehensive high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission measurements on CeFeAsO, a parent compound of FeAs-based high temperature superconductors with a mangetic/structural transition at $\sim$150 K. In the magnetic ordering state, four hole-like Fermi surface sheets are observed near $\Gamma$(0,0) and the Fermi surface near M(+/-$\pi$,+/-$\pi$) shows a tiny electron-like pocket at M surrounded by four Dirac cone-like strong spots. The unusual Fermi surface topology deviates strongly from the band structure calculations. The electronic signature of the magnetic/structural transition shows up in the dramatic change of the quasiparticle scattering rate. A dispersion kink at $\sim$ 25meV is for the first time observed in the parent compound of Fe-based superconductors.
  • In the pseudogap state of the high-Tc copper-oxide (cuprate) superconductors, angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) measurements have seen an Fermi arc, i.e., an open-ended gapless section in the large Fermi surface, rather than a closed loop expected of an ordinary metal. This is all the more puzzling because Fermi pockets (small closed Fermi surface features) have been suggested from recent quantum oscillation measurements. The Fermi arcs have worried the high-Tc community for many years because they cannot be understood in terms of existing theories. Theorists came up with a way out in the form of conventional Fermi surface pockets associated with competing order, with a back side that is for detailed reasons invisible by photoemission. Here we report ARPES measurements of La-Bi2201 that give direct evidence of the Fermi pocket. The charge carriers in the pocket are holes and the pockets show an unusual dependence upon doping, namely, they exist in underdoped but not overdoped samples. A big surprise is that these Fermi pockets appear to coexist with the Fermi arcs. This coexistence has not been expected theoretically and the understanding of the mysterious pseudogap state in the high-Tc cuprate superconductors will rely critically on understanding such a new finding.