• In this study we present the exploration of $\sim$500 spectroscopically confirmed galaxies in and around two large scale structures at $z\sim1$ drawn from the ORELSE survey. A sub-sample of these galaxies ($\sim$150) were targeted for the initial phases of a near-infrared MOSFIRE spectroscopic campaign investigating the differences in selections of galaxies which had recently ended a burst of star formation or had rapidly quenched (i.e., post-starburst or K+A galaxies). Selection with MOSFIRE resulted in a post-starburst sample more than double that selected by traditional $z\sim1$ (observed-frame optical) methods even after the removal of the relatively large fraction of dusty starburst galaxies selected through traditional methods. While the traditional post-starburst fraction increased with increased global density, the MOSFIRE-selected post-starburst fraction was found to be constant in field, group, and cluster environments. However, this fraction relative to the number of galaxies with ongoing star formation was observed to elevate in the cluster environment. Post-starbursts selected with MOSFIRE were predominantly found to exhibit moderately strong [OII] emission originating from activity other than star formation. Such galaxies, termed K+A with ImposteR [OII]-derived Star formation (KAIROS) galaxies, were found to be considerably younger than traditionally-selected post-starbursts and likely undergoing some form of feedback absent or diminished in traditional post-starbursts. A comparison between the environments of the two types of post-starbursts suggests a picture in which the evolution of a post-starburst galaxy is considerably different in cluster environments than in the more rarefied environments of a group or the field.
  • This is the first in a series of papers examining the demographics of star-forming galaxies at $0.2<z<2.5$ in CANDELS. We study 9,100 galaxies from GOODS-S and UDS having published values of redshifts, masses, star-formation rates (SFRs), and dust attenuation ($A_V$) derived from UV-optical SED fitting. In agreement with previous works, we find that the $UVJ$ colors of a galaxy are closely correlated with its specific star-formation rate (SSFR) and $A_V$. We define rotated $UVJ$ coordinate axes, termed $S_\mathrm{SED}$ and $C_\mathrm{SED}$, that are parallel and perpendicular to the star-forming sequence and derive a quantitative calibration that predicts SSFR from $C_\mathrm{SED}$ with an accuracy of ~0.2 dex. SFRs from UV-optical fitting and from UV+IR values based on Spitzer/MIPS 24 $\mu\mathrm{m}$ agree well overall, but systematic differences of order 0.2 dex exist at high and low redshifts. A novel plotting scheme conveys the evolution of multiple galaxy properties simultaneously, and dust growth, as well as star-formation decline and quenching, exhibit "mass-accelerated evolution" ("downsizing"). A population of transition galaxies below the star-forming main sequence is identified. These objects are located between star-forming and quiescent galaxies in $UVJ$ space and have lower $A_V$ and smaller radii than galaxies on the main sequence. Their properties are consistent with their being in transit between the two regions. The relative numbers of quenched, transition, and star-forming galaxies are given as a function of mass and redshift.
  • Understanding how bulges grow in galaxies is critical step towards unveiling the link between galaxy morphology and star-formation. To do so, it is necessary to decompose large sample of galaxies at different epochs into their main components (bulges and disks). This is particularly challenging, especially at high redshifts, where galaxies are poorly resolved. This work presents a catalog of bulge-disk decompositions of the surface brightness profiles of ~17.600 H-band selected galaxies in the CANDELS fields (F160W<23, 0<z<2) in 4 to 7 filters covering a spectral range of 430-1600nm. This is the largest available catalog of this kind up to z = 2. By using a novel approach based on deep-learning to select the best model to fit, we manage to control systematics arising from wrong model selection and obtain less contaminated samples than previous works. We show that the derived structural properties are within $\sim10-20\%$ of random uncertainties. We then fit stellar population models to the decomposed SEDs (Spectral Energy Distribution) of bulges and disks and derive stellar masses (and stellar mass bulge-to-total ratios) as well as rest-frame colors (U,V,J) for bulges and disks separately. All data products are publicly released with this paper and through the web page https://lerma.obspm.fr/huertas/form_CANDELS and will be used for scientific analysis in forthcoming works.
  • We present a large-scale galaxy structure Cl J021734-0513 at z~0.65 discovered in the UKIDSS UDS field, made of ~20 galaxy groups and clusters, spreading over 10 Mpc. We report on a VLT/VIMOS spectroscopic follow-up program that, combined with past spectroscopy, allowed us to confirm four galaxy clusters (M200 ~ 10^14 Msol) and a dozen associated groups and star-forming galaxy overdensities. Two additional filamentary structures at z ~ 0.62 and z ~ 0.69 and foreground and background clusters at 0.6 < z < 0.7 were also confirmed along the line-of-sight. The structure subcomponents are at different formation stages. The clusters have a core dominated by passive galaxies and an established red sequence. The remaining structures are a mix of star-forming galaxy overdensities and forming groups. The presence of quiescent galaxies in the core of the latter shows that `preprocessing' has already happened before the groups fall into their more massive neighbours. Our spectroscopy allows us to derive spectral index measurements e.g. emission/absorption line equivalent widths, strength of the 4000A break, valuable to investigate the star formation history of structure members. Based on these line measurements, we select a population of `poststarburst' galaxies. These galaxies are preferentially found within the virial radius of clusters, supporting a scenario in which their recent quenching could be prompted by gas stripping by the dense intracluster medium. We derive stellar age estimates using MCMC-based spectral fitting for quiescent galaxies and find a correlation between ages and colours/stellar masses which favours a top-down formation scenario of the red sequence. A catalogue of ~650 redshifts in UDS will be released alongside the paper.
  • We examine the fraction of massive ($M_{*}>10^{10} M_{\odot}$), compact star-forming galaxies (cSFGs) that host an active galactic nucleus (AGN) at $z\sim2$. These cSFGs are likely the direct progenitors of the compact quiescent galaxies observed at this epoch, which are the first population of passive galaxies to appear in large numbers in the early Universe. We identify cSFGs that host an AGN using a combination of Hubble WFC3 imaging and Chandra X-ray observations in four fields: the Chandra Deep Fields, the Extended Groth Strip, and the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey field. We find that $39.2^{+3.9}_{-3.6}$\% (65/166) of cSFGs at $1.4<z<3.0$ host an X-ray detected AGN. This fraction is 3.2 times higher than the incidence of AGN in extended star-forming galaxies with similar masses at these redshifts. This difference is significant at the $6.2\sigma$ level. Our results are consistent with models in which cSFGs are formed through a dissipative contraction that triggers a compact starburst and concurrent growth of the central black hole. We also discuss our findings in the context of cosmological galaxy evolution simulations that require feedback energy to rapidly quench cSFGs. We show that the AGN fraction peaks precisely where energy injection is needed to reproduce the decline in the number density of cSFGs with redshift. Our results suggest that the first abundant population of massive, quenched galaxies emerged directly following a phase of elevated supermassive black hole growth and further hints at a possible connection between AGN and the rapid quenching of star formation in these galaxies.
  • We present a multi-component structural analysis of the internal structure of $1074$ high redshift massive galaxies at $1<z<3$ from the CANDELS HST Survey. In particular we examine galaxies best-fit by two structural components, and thus likely forming discs and bulges. We examine the stellar mass, star formation rates, and colours of both the inner `bulge' and outer `disc' components for these systems using SED information from the resolved ACS+WFC3 HST imaging. We find that the majority of both inner and outer components lie in the star-forming region of UVJ space ($68$ and $90$ per cent respectively). However, the inner portions, or the likely forming bulges, are dominated by dusty star formation. Furthermore, we show that the outer components of these systems have a higher star formation rate than their inner regions, and the ratio of star formation rate between `disc' and `bulge' increases at lower redshifts. Despite the higher star formation rate of the outer component, the stellar mass ratio of inner to outer component remains constant through this epoch. This suggests that there is mass transfer from the outer to inner components for typical two component forming systems, thus building bulges from disks. Finally, using Chandra data we find that the presence of an AGN is more common in both $1$-component spheroid-like galaxies and $2$-component systems ($13\pm3$ and $11\pm2$ per cent) than in $1$-component disc-like galaxies ($3\pm1$ per cent), demonstrating that the formation of a central inner-component likely triggers the formation of central massive black holes in these galaxies.
  • We study galactic star-formation activity as a function of environment and stellar mass over 0.5<z<2.0 using the FourStar Galaxy Evolution (ZFOURGE) survey. We estimate the galaxy environment using a Bayesian-motivated measure of the distance to the third nearest neighbor for galaxies to the stellar mass completeness of our survey, $\log(M/M_\odot)>9 (9.5)$ at z=1.3 (2.0). This method, when applied to a mock catalog with the photometric-redshift precision ($\sigma_z / (1+z) \lesssim 0.02$), recovers galaxies in low- and high-density environments accurately. We quantify the environmental quenching efficiency, and show that at z> 0.5 it depends on galaxy stellar mass, demonstrating that the effects of quenching related to (stellar) mass and environment are not separable. In high-density environments, the mass and environmental quenching efficiencies are comparable for massive galaxies ($\log (M/M_\odot)\gtrsim$ 10.5) at all redshifts. For lower mass galaxies ($\log (M/M)_\odot) \lesssim$ 10), the environmental quenching efficiency is very low at $z\gtrsim$ 1.5, but increases rapidly with decreasing redshift. Environmental quenching can account for nearly all quiescent lower mass galaxies ($\log(M/M_\odot) \sim$ 9-10), which appear primarily at $z\lesssim$ 1.0. The morphologies of lower mass quiescent galaxies are inconsistent with those expected of recently quenched star-forming galaxies. Some environmental process must transform the morphologies on similar timescales as the environmental quenching itself. The evolution of the environmental quenching favors models that combine gas starvation (as galaxies become satellites) with gas exhaustion through star-formation and outflows ("overconsumption"), and additional processes such as galaxy interactions, tidal stripping and disk fading to account for the morphological differences between the quiescent and star-forming galaxy populations.
  • We investigate the impact of local environment on the galaxy stellar mass function (SMF) spanning a wide range of galaxy densities from the field up to dense cores of massive galaxy clusters. Data are drawn from a sample of eight fields from the Observations of Redshift Evolution in Large-Scale Environments (ORELSE) survey. Deep photometry allow us to select mass-complete samples of galaxies down to 10^9 Msol. Taking advantage of >4000 secure spectroscopic redshifts from ORELSE and precise photometric redshifts, we construct 3-dimensional density maps between 0.55<z<1.3 using a Voronoi tessellation approach. We find that the shape of the SMF depends strongly on local environment exhibited by a smooth, continual increase in the relative numbers of high- to low-mass galaxies towards denser environments. A straightforward implication is that local environment proportionally increases the efficiency of (a) destroying lower-mass galaxies and/or (b) growth of higher-mass galaxies. We also find a presence of this environmental dependence in the SMFs of star-forming and quiescent galaxies, although not quite as strongly for the quiescent subsample. To characterize the connection between the SMF of field galaxies and that of denser environments we devise a simple semi-empirical model. The model begins with a sample of ~10^6 galaxies at z_start=5 with stellar masses distributed according to the field. Simulated galaxies then evolve down to z_final=0.8 following empirical prescriptions for star-formation, quenching, and galaxy-galaxy merging. We run the simulation multiple times, testing a variety of scenarios with differing overall amounts of merging. Our model suggests that a large number of mergers are required to reproduce the SMF in dense environments. Additionally, a large majority of these mergers would have to occur in intermediate density environments (e.g. galaxy groups).
  • The bulk of the stellar growth over cosmic time is dominated by IR luminous galaxies at cosmic noon (z=1-2), many of which harbor a hidden active galactic nucleus (AGN). We use state of the art infrared color diagnostics, combining Spitzer and Herschel observations, to separate dust-obscured AGN from dusty star forming galaxies (SFGs) in the CANDELS and COSMOS surveys. We calculate 24 micron counts of SFGs, AGN/star forming "Composites", and AGN. AGN and Composites dominate the counts above 0.8 mJy at 24 micron, and Composites form at least 25% of an IR sample even to faint detection limits. We develop methods to use the Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) on JWST to identify dust-obscured AGN and Composite galaxies from z~1-2. With the sensitivity and spacing of MIRI filters, we will detect >4 times as many AGN hosts than with Spitzer/IRAC criteria. Any star formation rates based on the 7.7 micron PAH feature (likely to be applied to MIRI photometry) must be corrected for the contribution of the AGN, or the SFR will be overestimated by ~35% for cases where the AGN provides half the IR luminosity and ~50% when the AGN accounts for 90% of the luminosity. Finally, we demonstrate that our MIRI color technique can select AGN with an Eddington ratio of $\lambda_{\rm Edd}\sim0.01$ and will identify AGN hosts with a higher sSFR than X-ray techniques alone. JWST/MIRI will enable critical steps forward in identifying and understanding dust-obscured AGN and the link to their host galaxies.
  • At $z=1-3$, the formation of new stars is dominated by dusty galaxies whose far-IR emission indicates they contain colder dust than local galaxies of a similar luminosity. We explore the reasons for the evolving IR emission of similar galaxies over cosmic time using: 1) Local galaxies from GOALS $(L_{\rm IR}=10^{11}-10^{12}\,L_\odot)$; 2) Galaxies at $z\sim0.1-0.5$ from the 5MUSES ($L_{\rm IR}=10^{10}-10^{12}\,L_\odot$); 3) IR luminous galaxies spanning $z=0.5-3$ from GOODS and Spitzer xFLS ($L_{\rm IR}>10^{11}\,L_\odot$). All samples have Spitzer mid-IR spectra, and Herschel and ground-based submillimeter imaging covering the full IR spectral energy distribution, allowing us to robustly measure $L_{\rm IR}^{\rm\scriptscriptstyle SF}$, $T_{\rm dust}$, and $M_{\rm dust}$ for every galaxy. Despite similar infrared luminosities, $z>0.5$ dusty star forming galaxies have a factor of 5 higher dust masses and 5K colder temperatures. The increase in dust mass is linked with an increase in the gas fractions with redshift, and we do not observe a similar increase in stellar mass or star formation efficiency. $L_{160}^{\rm\scriptscriptstyle SF}/L_{70}^{\rm\scriptscriptstyle SF}$, a proxy for $T_{\rm dust}$, is strongly correlated with $L_{\rm IR}^{\rm\scriptscriptstyle SF}/M_{\rm dust}$ independently of redshift. We measure merger classification and galaxy size for a subsample, and there is no obvious correlation between these parameters and $L_{\rm IR}^{\rm \scriptscriptstyle SF}/M_{\rm dust}$ or $L_{160}^{\rm\scriptscriptstyle SF}/L_{70}^{\rm\scriptscriptstyle SF}$. In dusty star forming galaxies, the change in $L_{\rm IR}^{\rm\scriptscriptstyle SF}/M_{\rm dust}$ can fully account for the observed colder dust temperatures, suggesting that any change in the spatial extent of the interstellar medium is a second order effect.
  • We investigate the environmental quenching of galaxies, especially those with stellar masses (M*)$<10^{9.5} M_\odot$, beyond the local universe. Essentially all local low-mass quenched galaxies (QGs) are believed to live close to massive central galaxies, which is a demonstration of environmental quenching. We use CANDELS data to test {\it whether or not} such a dwarf QG--massive central galaxy connection exists beyond the local universe. To this purpose, we only need a statistically representative, rather than a complete, sample of low-mass galaxies, which enables our study to $z\gtrsim1.5$. For each low-mass galaxy, we measure the projected distance ($d_{proj}$) to its nearest massive neighbor (M*$>10^{10.5} M_\odot$) within a redshift range. At a given redshift and M*, the environmental quenching effect is considered to be observed if the $d_{proj}$ distribution of QGs ($d_{proj}^Q$) is significantly skewed toward lower values than that of star-forming galaxies ($d_{proj}^{SF}$). For galaxies with $10^{8} M_\odot < M* < 10^{10} M_\odot$, such a difference between $d_{proj}^Q$ and $d_{proj}^{SF}$ is detected up to $z\sim1$. Also, about 10\% of the quenched galaxies in our sample are located between two and four virial radii ($R_{Vir}$) of the massive halos. The median projected distance from low-mass QGs to their massive neighbors, $d_{proj}^Q / R_{Vir}$, decreases with satellite M* at $M* \lesssim 10^{9.5} M_\odot$, but increases with satellite M* at $M* \gtrsim 10^{9.5} M_\odot$. This trend suggests a smooth, if any, transition of the quenching timescale around $M* \sim 10^{9.5} M_\odot$ at $0.5<z<1.0$.
  • We investigate of the properties of $\sim$2000 Herschel/SPIRE-selected galaxies from $0<z<4$ using a combination of extensive spectroscopy, deep imaging from CFHT, VLA, Spitzer, XMM-Newton, and Herschel, and well-calibrated SED fitting. Herschel galaxies are observed to span a range of stellar masses, colors, and absolute magnitudes equivalent to galaxies undetected in SPIRE. Though many Herschel galaxies appear to be in transition, such galaxies are largely consistent with normal star-forming galaxies when rest-frame colors are utilized. The nature of the star-forming "main sequence" is studied and we warn against adopting this framework unless the main sequence is determined precisely. Herschel galaxies at different total infrared luminosities ($L_{TIR}$) are compared. Bluer colors, larger nebular extinctions, and larger contributions from younger stellar populations are observed for galaxies with larger $L_{TIR}$, suggesting that low-$L_{TIR}$ galaxies are undergoing rejuvenated starbursts while galaxies with higher $L_{TIR}$ are forming a larger percentage of their stellar mass. A variety of methods are used to select powerful active galactic nuclei (AGN). Galaxies hosting AGN are observed to be undergoing starbursts more commonly and vigorously than a matched sample of galaxies without powerful AGN and, additionally, the fraction of galaxies with an AGN increases with increasing star formation rate at all redshifts. At all redshifts ($0<z<4$) the most prodigious star-forming galaxies are found to contain the highest fraction of powerful AGN. For redshift bins that allow a comparison ($z>0.5$), the highest $L_{TIR}$ galaxies in a given redshift bin are unobserved by SPIRE at subsequently lower redshifts, a trend linked to downsizing. In conjunction with other results, this evidence is used to argue for prevalent AGN-driven quenching in starburst galaxies across cosmic time.
  • Important but rare and subtle processes driving galaxy morphology and star-formation may be missed by traditional spiral, elliptical, irregular or S\'ersic bulge/disk classifications. To overcome this limitation, we use a principal component analysis of non-parametric morphological indicators (concentration, asymmetry, Gini coefficient, $M_{20}$, multi-mode, intensity and deviation) measured at rest-frame $B$-band (corresponding to HST/WFC3 F125W at 1.4 $< z <$ 2) to trace the natural distribution of massive ($>10^{10} M_{\odot}$) galaxy morphologies. Principal component analysis (PCA) quantifies the correlations between these morphological indicators and determines the relative importance of each. The first three principal components (PCs) capture $\sim$75 per cent of the variance inherent to our sample. We interpret the first principal component (PC) as bulge strength, the second PC as dominated by concentration and the third PC as dominated by asymmetry. Both PC1 and PC2 correlate with the visual appearance of a central bulge and predict galaxy quiescence. PC1 is a better predictor of quenching than stellar mass, as as good as other structural indicators (S\'ersic-n or compactness). We divide the PCA results into groups using an agglomerative hierarchical clustering method. Unlike S\'ersic, this classification scheme separates compact galaxies from larger, smooth proto-elliptical systems, and star-forming disk-dominated clumpy galaxies from star-forming bulge-dominated asymmetric galaxies. Distinguishing between these galaxy structural types in a quantitative manner is an important step towards understanding the connections between morphology, galaxy assembly and star-formation.
  • We examine the host morphologies of heavily obscured active galactic nuclei (AGN) at $z\sim1$ to test whether obscured supermassive black hole growth at this epoch is preferentially linked to galaxy mergers. Our sample consists of 154 obscured AGN with $N_{\rm H}>10^{23.5}$ cm$^{-2}$ and $z<1.5$. Using visual classifications, we compare the morphologies of these AGN to control samples of moderately obscured ($10^{22}$ cm$^{-2}$ $<N_{\rm H}< 10^{23.5}$ cm$^{-2}$) and unobscured ($N_{\rm H}<10^{22}$ cm$^{-2}$) AGN. These control AGN are matched in redshift and intrinsic X-ray luminosity to our heavily obscured AGN. We find that heavily obscured AGN at z~1 are twice as likely to be hosted by late-type galaxies relative to unobscured AGN ($65.3^{+4.1}_{-4.6}\%$ vs $34.5^{+2.9}_{-2.7}\%$) and three times as likely to exhibit merger or interaction signatures ($21.5^{+4.2}_{-3.3}\%$ vs $7.8^{+1.9}_{-1.3}\%$). The increased merger fraction is significant at the 3.8$\sigma$ level. We also find that the incidence of point-like morphologies is inversely proportional to obscuration. If we exclude all point sources and consider only extended hosts, we find the correlation between merger fraction and obscuration is still evident, however at a reduced statistical significance ($2.5\sigma$). The fact that we observe a different disk/spheroid fraction versus obscuration indicates that viewing angle cannot be the only thing differentiating our three AGN samples, as a simple unification model would suggest. The increased fraction of disturbed morphologies with obscuration supports an evolutionary scenario, in which Compton-thick AGN are a distinct phase of obscured SMBH growth following a merger/interaction event. Our findings also suggest that some of the merger-triggered SMBH growth predicted by recent AGN fueling models may be hidden among the heavily obscured, Compton-thick population.
  • We present a robust measurement and analysis of the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) luminosity function at z=4-8. We use deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging over the CANDELS/GOODS fields, the Hubble Ultra Deep Field and the Year 1 Hubble Frontier Field deep parallel observations. These surveys provides an effective volume of 0.6-1.2 x 10^6 Mpc^3 over this epoch, allowing us to perform a robust search for faint (M_UV=-18) and bright (M_UV < -21) galaxies. We select candidate galaxies using a well-tested photometric redshift technique with careful screening of contaminants, finding a sample of 7446 galaxies at 3.5<z<8.5, with >1000 galaxies at z~6-8. We measure the luminosity function using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis to measure robust uncertainties. At the faint end our results agree with previous studies, yet we find a higher abundance of UV-bright galaxies at z>6, with M* ~ -21 at z>5, different than that inferred based on previous trends at lower redshift. At z=8, a single power-law provides an equally good fit to the UV luminosity function, while at z=6 and 7, an exponential cutoff at the bright-end is moderately preferred. We compare to semi-analytical models, and find that the lack of evolution in M* is consistent with models where the impact of dust attenuation on the bright-end of the luminosity function decreases at higher redshift. We measure the evolution of the cosmic star-formation rate density, correcting for dust attenuation, and find that it declines as (1+z)^(-4.3 +/- 0.5) at z>4, consistent with observations at z>9. Our observations are consistent with a reionization history that starts at z>10, completes at z>6, and reaches a midpoint (x_HII = 0.5) at 6.7<z<9.4. Finally, our observations predict that the abundance of bright z=9 galaxies is likely higher than previous constraints, though consistent with recent estimates of bright z~10 galaxies. [abridged]
  • We combine HST/WFC3 imaging and G141 grism observations from the CANDELS and 3D-HST surveys to produce a catalog of grism spectroscopic redshifts for galaxies in the CANDELS/GOODS-South field. The WFC3/G141 grism spectra cover a wavelength range of 1.1<lambda<1.7 microns with a resolving power of R~130 for point sources, thus providing rest-frame optical spectra for galaxies out to z~3.5. The catalog is selected in the H-band (F160W) and includes both galaxies with and without previously published spectroscopic redshifts. Grism spectra are extracted for all H-band detected galaxies with H<24 and a CANDELS photometric redshift z_phot > 0.6. The resulting spectra are visually inspected to identify emission lines and redshifts are determined using cross-correlation with empirical spectral templates. To establish the accuracy of our redshifts, we compare our results against high-quality spectroscopic redshifts from the literature. Using a sample of 411 control galaxies, this analysis yields a precision of sigma_NMAD=0.0028 for the grism-derived redshifts, which is consistent with the accuracy reported by the 3D-HST team. Our final catalog covers an area of 153 square arcmin and contains 1019 redshifts for galaxies in GOODS-S. Roughly 60% (608/1019) of these redshifts are for galaxies with no previously published spectroscopic redshift. These new redshifts span a range of 0.677 < z < 3.456 and have a median redshift of z=1.282. The catalog contains a total of 234 new redshifts for galaxies at z>1.5. In addition, we present 20 galaxy pair candidates identified for the first time using the grism redshifts in our catalog, including four new galaxy pairs at z~2, nearly doubling the number of such pairs previously identified.
  • We present a new study investigating whether active galactic nuclei (AGN) beyond the local universe are preferentially fed via large-scale bars. Our investigation combines data from Chandra and Galaxy Zoo: Hubble (GZH) in the AEGIS, COSMOS, and GOODS-S surveys to create samples of face-on, disc galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0. We use a novel method to robustly compare a sample of 120 AGN host galaxies, defined to have 10^42 erg/s < L_X < 10^44 erg/s, with inactive control galaxies matched in stellar mass, rest-frame colour, size, Sersic index, and redshift. Using the GZH bar classifications of each sample, we demonstrate that AGN hosts show no statistically significant enhancement in bar fraction or average bar likelihood compared to closely-matched inactive galaxies. In detail, we find that the AGN bar fraction cannot be enhanced above the control bar fraction by more than a factor of two, at 99.7% confidence. We similarly find no significant difference in the AGN fraction among barred and non-barred galaxies. Thus we find no compelling evidence that large-scale bars directly fuel AGN at 0.2<z<1.0. This result, coupled with previous results at z=0, implies that moderate-luminosity AGN have not been preferentially fed by large-scale bars since z=1. Furthermore, given the low bar fractions at z>1, our findings suggest that large-scale bars have likely never directly been a dominant fueling mechanism for supermassive black hole growth.
  • We combine photometry from the UDS, and CANDELS UDS and CANDELS GOODS-S surveys to construct the galaxy stellar mass function probing both the low and high mass end accurately in the redshift range 0.3<z<3. The advantages of using a homogeneous concatenation of these datasets include meaningful measures of environment in the UDS, due to its large area (0.88 deg^2), and the high resolution deep imaging in CANDELS (H_160 > 26.0), affording us robust measures of structural parameters. We construct stellar mass functions for the entire sample as parameterised by the Schechter function, and find that there is a decline in the values of phi and of alpha with higher redshifts, and a nearly constant M* up to z~3. We divide the galaxy stellar mass function by colour, structure, and environment and explore the links between environmental over-density, morphology, and the quenching of star formation. We find that a double Schechter function describes galaxies with high Sersic index (n>2.5), similar to galaxies which are red or passive. The low-mass end of the n>2.5 stellar mass function is dominated by blue galaxies, whereas the high-mass end is dominated by red galaxies. This hints that possible links between morphological evolution and star formation quenching are only present in high-mass galaxies. This is turn suggests that there are strong mass dependent quenching mechanisms. In addition, we find that the number density of high mass systems is elevated in dense environments, suggesting that an environmental process is building up massive galaxies quicker in over densities than in lower densities.
  • We present photometric redshifts and associated probability distributions for all detected sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS). The work makes use of the most up-to-date data from the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Legacy Survey (CANDELS) and the Taiwan ECDFS Near-Infrared Survey (TENIS) in addition to other data. We also revisit multi-wavelength counterparts for published X-ray sources from the 4Ms-CDFS and 250ks-ECDFS surveys, finding reliable counterparts for 1207 out of 1259 sources ($\sim 96\%$). Data used for photometric redshifts include intermediate-band photometry deblended using the TFIT method, which is used for the first time in this work. Photometric redshifts for X-ray source counterparts are based on a new library of AGN/galaxy hybrid templates appropriate for the faint X-ray population in the CDFS. Photometric redshift accuracy for normal galaxies is 0.010 and for X-ray sources is 0.014, and outlier fractions are $4\%$ and $5.4\%$ respectively. The results within the CANDELS coverage area are even better as demonstrated both by spectroscopic comparison and by galaxy-pair statistics. Intermediate-band photometry, even if shallow, is valuable when combined with deep broad-band photometry. For best accuracy, templates must include emission lines.
  • The Cl1604 supercluster at $z \sim 0.9$ is one of the most extensively studied high redshift large scale structures, with more than 500 spectroscopically confirmed members. It consists of 8 clusters and groups, with members numbering from a dozen to nearly a hundred, providing a broad range of environments for investigating the large scale environmental effects on galaxy evolution. Here we examine the properties of 48 post-starburst galaxies in Cl1604, comparing them to other galaxy populations in the same supercluster. Incorporating photometry from ground-based optical and near-infrared imaging, along with $Spitzer$ mid-infrared observations, we derive stellar masses for all Cl1604 members. The colors and stellar masses of the K+A galaxies support the idea that they are progenitors of red sequence galaxies. Their morphologies, residual star-formation rates, and spatial distributions suggest galaxy mergers may be the principal mechanism producing post-starburst galaxies. Interaction between galaxies and the dense intra-cluster medium is also effective, but only in the cores of dynamically evolved clusters. The prevalence of post-starburst galaxies in clusters correlates with the dynamical state of the host cluster, as both galaxy mergers and the dense intra-cluster medium produce post-starburst galaxies. We also investigate the incompleteness and contamination of K+A samples selected by means of H$\delta$ and [OII] equivalent widths. K+A samples may be up to $\sim50\%$ incomplete due to the presence of LINER/Seyferts and up to $\sim30\%$ of K+A galaxies could have substantial star formation activity.
  • In this study we investigate the formation and evolution mechanisms of the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) over cosmic time. At high redshift ($z\sim0.9$), we selected BCGs and most massive cluster galaxies (MMCGs) from the Cl1604 supercluster and compared them to low-redshift ($z\sim0.1$) counterparts drawn from the MCXC meta-catalog, supplemented by SDSS imaging and spectroscopy. We observed striking differences in the morphological, color, spectral, and stellar mass properties of the BCGs/MMCGs in the two samples. High-redshift BCGs/MMCGs were, in many cases, star-forming, late-type galaxies, with blue broadband colors, properties largely absent amongst the low-redshift BCGs/MMCGs. The stellar mass of BCGs was found to increase by an average factor of $2.51\pm0.71$ from $z\sim0.9$ to $z\sim0.1$. Through this and other comparisons we conclude that a combination of major merging (mainly wet or mixed) and \emph{in situ} star formation are the main mechanisms which build stellar mass in BCGs/MMCGs. The stellar mass growth of the BCGs/MMCGs also appears to grow in lockstep with both the stellar baryonic and total mass of the cluster. Additionally, BCGs/MMCGs were found to grow in size, on average, a factor of $\sim3$, while their average S\'ersic index increased by $\sim$0.45 from $z\sim0.9$ to $z\sim0.1$, also supporting a scenario involving major merging, though some adiabatic expansion is required. These observational results are compared to both models and simulations to further explore the implications on processes which shape and evolve BCGs/MMCGs over the past $\sim$7 Gyr.
  • Exploiting the deep high-resolution imaging of all 5 CANDELS fields, and accurate redshift information provided by 3D-HST, we investigate the relation between structure and stellar populations for a mass-selected sample of 6764 galaxies above 10^10 Msun, spanning the redshift range 0.5 < z < 2.5. For the first time, we fit 2-dimensional models comprising a single Sersic fit and two-component (i.e., bulge + disk) decompositions not only to the H-band light distributions, but also to the stellar mass maps reconstructed from resolved stellar population modeling. We confirm that the increased bulge prominence among quiescent galaxies, as reported previously based on rest-optical observations, remains in place when considering the distributions of stellar mass. Moreover, we observe an increase of the typical Sersic index and bulge-to-total ratio (with median B/T reaching 40-50%) among star-forming galaxies above 10^11 Msun. Given that quenching for these most massive systems is likely to be imminent, our findings suggest that significant bulge growth precedes a departure from the star-forming main sequence. We demonstrate that the bulge mass (and ideally knowledge of the bulge and total mass) is a more reliable predictor of the star-forming versus quiescent state of a galaxy than the total stellar mass. The same trends are predicted by the state-of-the-art semi-analytic model by Somerville et al. In the latter, bulges and black holes grow hand in hand through merging and/or disk instabilities, and AGN-feedback shuts off star formation. Further observations will be required to pin down star formation quenching mechanisms, but our results imply they must be internal to the galaxies and closely associated with bulge growth.
  • Spectroscopic observations from the Large Binocular Telescope and the Very Large Telescope reveal kinematically narrow lines (~50 km/s) for a sample of 14 Extreme Emission Line Galaxies (EELGs) at redshifts 1.4 < z < 2.3. These measurements imply that the total dynamical masses of these systems are low (< 3x10^9 M_sun). Their large [O III] 5007 equivalent widths (500-1100 Angstroms) and faint blue continuum emission imply young ages of 10-100 Myr and stellar masses of 10^8-10^9 M_sun, confirming the presence of a violent starburst. The dynamical masses represent the first such determinations for low-mass galaxies at z > 1. The stellar mass formed in this vigorous starburst phase represents a large fraction of the total (dynamical) mass, without a significantly massive underlying population of older stars. The occurrence of such intense events in shallow potentials strongly suggests that supernova-driven winds must be of critical importance in the subsequent evolution of these systems.
  • We analyze the resolved stellar populations of 473 massive star-forming galaxies at 0.7 < z < 1.5, with multi-wavelength broad-band imaging from CANDELS and Halpha surface brightness profiles at the same kiloparsec resolution from 3D-HST. Together, this unique data set sheds light on how the assembled stellar mass is distributed within galaxies, and where new stars are being formed. We find the Halpha morphologies to resemble more closely those observed in the ACS I band than in the WFC3 H band, especially for the larger systems. We next derive a novel prescription for Halpha dust corrections, which accounts for extra extinction towards HII regions. The prescription leads to consistent SFR estimates and reproduces the observed relation between the Halpha/UV luminosity ratio and visual extinction, both on a pixel-by-pixel and on a galaxy-integrated level. We find the surface density of star formation to correlate with the surface density of assembled stellar mass for spatially resolved regions within galaxies, akin to the so-called 'main sequence of star formation' established on a galaxy-integrated level. Deviations from this relation towards lower equivalent widths are found in the inner regions of galaxies. Clumps and spiral features, on the other hand, are associated with enhanced Halpha equivalent widths, bluer colors, and higher specific star formation rates compared to the underlying disk. Their Halpha/UV luminosity ratio is lower than that of the underlying disk, suggesting the ACS clump selection preferentially picks up those regions of elevated star formation activity that are the least obscured by dust. Our analysis emphasizes that monochromatic studies of galaxy structure can be severely limited by mass-to-light ratio variations due to dust and spatially inhomogeneous star formation histories.
  • We present a UV-to-mid infrared multi-wavelength catalog in the CANDELS/GOODS-S field, combining the newly obtained CANDELS HST/WFC3 F105W, F125W, and F160W data with existing public data. The catalog is based on source detection in the WFC3 F160W band. The F160W mosaic includes the data from CANDELS deep and wide observations as well as previous ERS and HUDF09 programs. The mosaic reaches a 5$\sigma$ limiting depth (within an aperture of radius 0.17 arcsec) of 27.4, 28.2, and 29.7 AB for CANDELS wide, deep, and HUDF regions, respectively. The catalog contains 34930 sources with the representative 50% completeness reaching 25.9, 26.6, and 28.1 AB in the F160W band for the three regions. In addition to WFC3 bands, the catalog also includes data from UV (U-band from both CTIO/MOSAIC and VLT/VIMOS), optical (HST/ACS F435W, F606W, F775W, F814W, and F850LP), and infrared (HST/WFC3 F098M, VLT/ISAAC Ks, VLT/HAWK-I Ks, and Spitzer/IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0 $\mu$m) observations. The catalog is validated via stellar colors, comparison with other published catalogs, zeropoint offsets determined from the best-fit templates of the spectral energy distribution of spectroscopically observed objects, and the accuracy of photometric redshifts. The catalog is able to detect unreddened star-forming (passive) galaxies with stellar mass of 10^{10}M_\odot at a 50% completeness level to z$\sim$3.4 (2.8), 4.6 (3.2), and 7.0 (4.2) in the three regions. As an example of application, the catalog is used to select both star-forming and passive galaxies at z$\sim$2--4 via the Balmer break. It is also used to study the color--magnitude diagram of galaxies at 0<z<4.