• In this paper we present some new complexity results on the routing time of a graph under the \textit{routing via matching} model. This is a parallel routing model which was introduced by Alon et al\cite{alon1994routing}. The model can be viewed as a communication scheme on a distributed network. The nodes in the network can communicate via matchings (a step), where a node exchanges data (pebbles) with its matched partner. Let $G$ be a connected graph with vertices labeled from $\{1,...,n\}$ and the destination vertices of the pebbles are given by a permutation $\pi$. The problem is to find a minimum step routing scheme for the input permutation $\pi$. This is denoted as the routing time $rt(G,\pi)$ of $G$ given $\pi$. In this paper we characterize the complexity of some known problems under the routing via matching model and discuss their relationship to graph connectivity and clique number. We also introduce some new problems in this domain, which may be of independent interest.
  • The sorting number of a graph with $n$ vertices is the minimum depth of a sorting network with $n$ inputs and outputs that uses only the edges of the graph to perform comparisons. Many known results on sorting networks can be stated in terms of sorting numbers of different classes of graphs. In this paper we show the following general results about the sorting number of graphs. Any $n$-vertex graph that contains a simple path of length $d$ has a sorting network of depth $O(n \log(n/d))$. Any $n$-vertex graph with maximal degree $\Delta$ has a sorting network of depth $O(\Delta n)$. We also provide several results that relate the sorting number of a graph with its routing number, size of its maximal matching, and other well known graph properties. Additionally, we give some new bounds on the sorting number for some typical graphs.
  • In this short note we give the routing number of pyramid graph under the \textit{routing via matching} model introduced by Alon et al\cite{5}. This model can be viewed as a communication scheme on a distributed network. The nodes in the network can communicate via matchings (a step), where a node exchanges data with its partner. Formally, given a connected graph $G$ with vertices labeled from $[1,...,n]$ and a permutation $\pi$ giving the destination of pebbles on the vertices the problem is to find a minimum step routing scheme. This is denoted as the routing time $rt(G,\pi)$ of $G$ given $\pi$. We show that a $d$-dimensional pyramid with $m$ levels has a routing number of $O(dN^{1/d})$.
  • The paper is divided in to two parts. In the first part we present some new results for the \textit{routing via matching} model introduced by Alon et al\cite{5}. This model can be viewed as a communication scheme on a distributed network. The nodes in the network can communicate via matchings (a step), where a node exchanges data with its partner. Formally, given a connected graph $G$ with vertices labeled from $[1,...,n]$ and a permutation $\pi$ giving the destination of pebbles on the vertices the problem is to find a minimum step routing scheme. This is denoted as the routing time $rt(G,\pi)$ of $G$ given $\pi$. In this paper we present the following new results, which answer one of the open problems posed in \cite{5}: 1) Determining whether $rt(G,\pi)$ is $\le 2$ can be done in $O(n^{2.5})$ deterministic time for any arbitrary connected graph $G$. 2) Determining whether $rt(G,\pi)$ is $\le k$ for any $k \ge 3$ is NP-Complete. In the second part we study a related property of graphs, which measures how easy it is to design sorting networks using only the edges of a given graph. Informally, \textit{sorting number} of a graph is the minimum depth sorting network that only uses edges of the graph. Many of the classical results on sorting networks can be represented in this framework. We show that a tree with maximum degree $\Delta$ can accommodate a $O(\min(n\Delta^2,n^2))$ depth sorting network. Additionally, we give two instance of trees for which this bound is tight.
  • In this paper we study the problem of sorting under non-uniform comparison costs, where costs are either 1 or $\infty$. If comparing a pair has an associated cost of $\infty$ then we say that such a pair cannot be compared (forbidden pairs). Along with the set of elements $V$ the input to our problem is a graph $G(V, E)$, whose edges represents the pairs that we can compare incurring an unit of cost. Given a graph with $n$ vertices and $q$ forbidden edges we propose the first non-trivial deterministic algorithm which makes $O((q + n)\log{n})$ comparisons with a total complexity of $O(n^2 + q^{\omega/2})$, where $\omega$ is the exponent in the complexity of matrix multiplication. We also propose a simple randomized algorithm for the problem which makes $\widetilde{O}(n^2/\sqrt{q + n} + n\sqrt{q})$ probes with high probability. When the input graph is random we show that $\widetilde{O}(\min{(n^{3/2}, pn^2)})$ probes suffice, where $p$ is the edge probability.
  • In this paper we present a randomized algorithm for computing the collection of maximal layers for a point set in $E^{k}$ ($k = f(n)$). The input to our algorithm is a point set $P = \{p_1,...,p_n\}$ with $p_i \in E^{k}$. The proposed algorithm achieves a runtime of $O\left(kn^{2 - {1 \over \log{k}} + \log_k{\left(1 + {2 \over {k+1}}\right)}}\log{n}\right)$ when $P$ is a random order and a runtime of $O(k^2 n^{3/2 + (\log_{k}{(k-1)})/2}\log{n})$ for an arbitrary $P$. Both bounds hold in expectation. Additionally, the run time is bounded by $O(kn^2)$ in the worst case. This is the first non-trivial algorithm whose run-time remains polynomial whenever $f(n)$ is bounded by some polynomial in $n$ while remaining sub-quadratic in $n$ for constant $k$. The algorithm is implemented using a new data-structure for storing and answering dominance queries over the set of incomparable points.