• In this paper we present a novel inference methodology to perform Bayesian inference for spatiotemporal Cox processes where the intensity function depends on a multivariate Gaussian process. Dynamic Gaussian processes are introduced to allow for evolution of the intensity function over discrete time. The novelty of the method lies on the fact that no discretisation error is involved despite the non-tractability of the likelihood function and infinite dimensionality of the problem. The method is based on a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm that samples from the joint posterior distribution of the parameters and latent variables of the model. The models are defined in a general and flexible way but they are amenable to direct sampling from the relevant distributions, due to careful characterisation of its components. The models also allow for the inclusion of regression covariates and/or temporal components to explain the variability of the intensity function. These components may be subject to relevant interaction with space and/or time. Real and simulated examples illustrate the methodology, followed by concluding remarks.
  • Inference over tails is performed by applying only the results of extreme value theory. Whilst such theory is well defined and flexible enough in the univariate case, multivariate inferential methods often require the imposition of arbitrary constraints not fully justifed by the underlying theory. In contrast, our approach uses only the constraints imposed by theory. We build on previous, theoretically justified work for marginal exceedances over a high, unknown threshold, by combining it with flexible, semiparametric copulae specifications to investigate extreme dependence. Whilst giving probabilistic judgements about the extreme regime of all marginal variables, our approach formally uses the full dataset and allows for a variety of patterns of dependence, be them extremal or not. A new probabilistic criterion quantifying the possibility that the data exhibits asymptotic independence is introduced and its robustness empirically studied. Estimation of functions of interest in extreme value analyses is performed via MCMC algorithms. Attention is also devoted to the prediction of new extreme observations. Our approach is evaluated through a series of simulations, applied to real data sets and assessed against competing approaches. Evidence demonstrates that the bulk of the data does not bias and improves the inferential process for the extremal dependence.
  • This paper analyses the effect of preferential sampling in Geostatistics when the choice of new sampling locations is the main interest of the researcher. A Bayesian criterion based on maximizing utility functions is used. Simulated studies are presented and highlight the strong influence of preferential sampling in the decisions. The computational complexity is faced by treating the new local sampling locations as a model parameter and the optimal choice is then made by analysing its posterior distribution. Finally, an application is presented using rainfall data collected during spring in Rio de Janeiro. The results showed that the optimal design is substantially changed under preferential sampling effects. Furthermore, it was possible to identify other interesting aspects related to preferential sampling effects in estimation and prediction in Geostatistics. With the Rejoinder to Comments [arXiv:1509.04817], [arXiv:1509.04819], [arXiv:1509.04821].