• Dozens of habitable zone, approximately earth-sized exoplanets are known today. An emerging frontier of exoplanet studies is identifying which of these habitable zone, small planets are actually habitable (have all necessary conditions for life) and, of those, which are earth-like. Many parameters and processes influence habitability, ranging from the orbit through detailed composition including volatiles and organics, to the presence of geological activity and plate tectonics. While some properties will soon be directly observable, others cannot be probed by remote sensing for the foreseeable future. Thus, statistical understanding of planetary systems' formation and evolution is a key supplement to the direct measurements of planet properties. Probabilistically assessing parameters we cannot directly measure is essential to reliably assess habitability, to prioritizing habitable-zone planets for follow-up, and for interpreting possible biosignatures.
  • Transmission spectroscopy during planetary transits is expected to be a major source of information on the atmospheres of small (approximately Earth-sized) exoplanets in the next two decades. This technique, however, is intrinsically affected by stellar spectral contamination caused by the fact that stellar photo- and chromospheres are not perfectly homogeneous. Such stellar contamination will often reach or exceed the signal introduced by the planetary spectral features. Finding effective methods to correct stellar contamination -- or at least to quantify its possible range -- for the most important exoplanets is a necessary step for our understanding of exoplanet atmospheres. This will require significantly deepening our understanding of stellar heterogeneity, which is currently limited by the available data.
  • Time-resolved observations of brown dwarfs' rotational modulations provide powerful insights into the properties of condensate clouds in ultra-cool atmospheres. Multi-wavelength light curves reveal cloud vertical structures, condensate particle sizes, and cloud morphology, which directly constrain condensate cloud and atmospheric circulation models. We report results from Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 near-infrared G141 taken in six consecutive orbits observations of HN Peg B, an L/T transition brown dwarf companion to a G0V type star. The best-fit sine wave to the $1.1-1.7\mu$m broadband light curve has the amplitude of $1.206\pm0.025\%$ and period of $15.4\pm0.5$ hr. The modulation amplitude has no detectable wavelength dependence except in the 1.4 $\mu$m water absorption band, indicating that the characteristic condensate particle sizes are large ($>1\mu$m). We detect significantly ($4.4\sigma$) lower modulation amplitude in the 1.4$\mu$m water absorption band, and find that HN Peg B's spectral modulation resembles those of early T type brown dwarfs. We also describe a new empirical interpolation method to remove spectral contamination from the bright host star. This method may be applied in other high-contrast time-resolved observations with WFC3.
  • The seven approximately Earth-sized transiting planets in the TRAPPIST-1 system provide a unique opportunity to explore habitable zone and non-habitable zone small planets within the same system. Its habitable zone exoplanets -- due to their favorable transit depths -- are also worlds for which atmospheric transmission spectroscopy is within reach with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). We present here an independent reduction and analysis of two HST Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) near-infrared transit spectroscopy datasets for six planets (b through g). Utilizing our physically-motivated detector charge trap correction and a custom cosmic ray correction routine we confirm the general shape of the transmission spectra presented by deWit2016 for planets b and c. Our data reduction approach leads to a 25\% increase in the usable data and reduces the risk of confusing astrophysical brightness variations (e.g., flares) with instrumental systematics. No prominent absorption features are detected in any individual planet's transmission spectra; by contrast, the combined spectra of the planets show a clear inverted water absorption feature. We show that this feature -- along with the Spitzer transit depth measurements -- are fully consistent with stellar contamination, as predicted by Rackham2017b. These spectra demonstrate how stellar contamination can overwhelm planetary absorption features in low-resolution exoplanet transit spectra obtained by HST and JWST and also highlight the challenges in combining multi-epoch observations for planets around rapidly rotating spotted stars.
  • Transmission spectra are differential measurements that utilize stellar illumination to probe transiting exoplanet atmospheres. Any spectral difference between the illuminating light source and the disk-integrated stellar spectrum due to starspots and faculae will be imprinted in the observed transmission spectrum. However, few constraints exist for the extent of photospheric heterogeneities in M dwarfs. Here, we model spot and faculae covering fractions consistent with observed photometric variabilities for M dwarfs and the associated 0.3-5.5 $\mu$m stellar contamination spectra. We find that large ranges of spot and faculae covering fractions are consistent with observations and corrections assuming a linear relation between variability amplitude and covering fractions generally underestimate the stellar contamination. Using realistic estimates for spot and faculae covering fractions, we find stellar contamination can be more than $10 \times$ larger than transit depth changes expected for atmospheric features in rocky exoplanets. We also find that stellar spectral contamination can lead to systematic errors in radius and therefore the derived density of small planets. In the case of the TRAPPIST-1 system, we show that TRAPPIST-1's rotational variability is consistent with spot covering fractions $f_{spot} = 8^{+18}_{-7}\%$ and faculae covering fractions $f_{fac} = 54^{+16}_{-46}\%$. The associated stellar contamination signals alter transit depths of the TRAPPIST-1 planets at wavelengths of interest for planetary atmospheric species by roughly 1-15 $\times$ the strength of planetary features, significantly complicating $JWST$ follow-up observations of this system. Similarly, we find stellar contamination can lead to underestimates of bulk densities of the TRAPPIST-1 planets of $\Delta(\rho) = -3^{+3}_{-8} \%$, thus leading to overestimates of their volatile contents.
  • The search for life on planets outside our solar system has largely been the province of the astrophysics community until recently. A major development since the NASA Astrobiology Strategy 2015 document (AS15) has been the integration of other NASA science disciplines (planetary science, heliophysics, Earth science) with ongoing exoplanet research in astrophysics. The NASA Nexus for Exoplanet System Science (NExSS) provides a forum for scientists to collaborate across disciplines to accelerate progress in the search for life elsewhere. Here we describe recent developments in these other disciplines, with a focus on exoplanet properties and environments, and the prospects for future progress that will be achieved by integrating emerging knowledge from astrophysics with insights from these fields.
  • HD 100453AB is a 10+/-2 Myr old binary whose protoplanetary disk was recently revealed to host a global two-armed spiral structure. Given the relatively small projected separation of the binary (1.05", or ~108 au), gravitational perturbations by the binary seemed to be a likely driving force behind the formation of the spiral arms. However, the orbit of these stars remained poorly understood, which prevented a proper treatment of the dynamical influence of the companion on the disk. We observed HD 100453AB between 2015-2017 utilizing extreme adaptive optics systems on the Very Large Telescope and Magellan Clay Telescope. We combined the astrometry from these observations with published data to constrain the parameters of the binary's orbit to a=1.06"+/-0.09", e=0.17+/-0.07, and i=32.5+/- 6.5 degrees. We utilized publicly available ALMA CO data to constrain the inclination of the disk to i~28 degrees, which is relatively co-planar with the orbit of the companion and consistent with previous estimates from scattered light images. Finally, we input these constraints into hydrodynamical and radiative transfer simulations to model the structural evolution of the disk. We find that the spiral structure and truncation of the circumprimary disk in HD 100453 are consistent with a companion-dirven origin. Furthermore, we find that the primary star's rotation, its outer disk, and the companion exhibit roughly the same direction of angular momentum, and thus the system likely formed from the same parent body of material.
  • Observations of rotational modulations of brown dwarfs and giant exoplanets allow the characterization of condensate cloud properties. As of now rotational spectral modulations have only been seen in three L-type brown dwarfs. We report here the discovery of rotational spectral modulations in LP261-75B, an L6-type intermediate surface gravity companion to an M4.5 star. As a part of the Cloud Atlas Treasury program we acquired time-resolved Wide Field Camera 3 grism spectroscopy (1.1--1.69~$\mu$m) of LP261-75B. We find gray spectral variations with the relative amplitude displaying only a weak wavelength dependence and no evidence for lower-amplitude modulations in the 1.4~$\mu$m water band than in the adjacent continuum. The likely rotational modulation period is 4.78$\pm$0.95 h, although the rotational phase is not well sampled. The minimum relative amplitude in the white light curve measured over the whole wavelength range is 2.41$\pm$0.14\%. We report an unusual light curve with seemingly three peaks approximately evenly distributed in rotational phase. The spectral modulations suggests that the upper atmosphere cloud properties in {LP261-75B} are similar to two other mid-L dwarfs of typical infrared colors, but differ from that of the extremely red L-dwarf WISE0047.
  • Although the final observations of the Spitzer Warm Mission are currently scheduled for March 2019, it can continue operations through the end of the decade with no loss of photometric precision. As we will show, there is a strong science case for extending the current Warm Mission to December 2020. Spitzer has already made major impacts in the fields of exoplanets (including microlensing events), characterizing near Earth objects, enhancing our knowledge of nearby stars and brown dwarfs, understanding the properties and structure of our Milky Way galaxy, and deep wide-field extragalactic surveys to study galaxy birth and evolution. By extending Spitzer through 2020, it can continue to make ground-breaking discoveries in those fields, and provide crucial support to the NASA flagship missions JWST and WFIRST, as well as the upcoming TESS mission, and it will complement ground-based observations by LSST and the new large telescopes of the next decade. This scientific program addresses NASA's Science Mission Directive's objectives in astrophysics, which include discovering how the universe works, exploring how it began and evolved, and searching for life on planets around other stars.
  • The NASA Exoplanet Exploration Program's SAG15 group has solicited, collected, and organized community input on high-level science questions that could be addressed with future direct imaging exoplanet missions and the type and quality of data answering these questions will require. Input was solicited through a variety of forums and the report draft was shared with the exoplanet community continuously during the period of the report development (Nov 2015 -- May 2017). The report benefitted from the input of over 50 exoplanet scientists and from multiple open-forum discussions at exoplanet and astrobiology meetings. The SAG15 team has identified three group of high-level questions, those that focus on the properties of planetary systems (Questions A1--A2), those that focus on the properties of individual planets (Questions B1--B4), and questions that relate to planetary processes (Questions C1--C4). The questions in categories A, B, and C require different target samples and often different observational approaches. For each questions we summarize the current body of knowledge, the available and future observational approaches that can directly or indirectly contribute to answering the question, and provide examples and general considerations for the target sample required.
  • The Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph's (STIS) BAR5 coronagraphic occulter was designed to provide high-contrast, visible-light, imaging in close (>= 0.15") angular proximity to bright point-sources. This is the smallest inner working angle (IWA) possible with HST's suite of coronagraphically augmented instruments through its mission lifetime. The STIS BAR5 image plane occulter, however, was damaged (bent and deformed) pre-launch and had not been enabled for GO science use following the installation of the instrument in 1997, during HST servicing mission SM2. With the success of the HST GO 12923 program, discussed herein, we explored and verified the functionality and utility of the BAR5 occulter. Thus, despite its physical damage, with updates to the knowledge of the aperture mask metrology and target pointing requirements, a robust determination of achievable raw and PSF-subtracted stellocentric image contrasts and fidelity was conducted. We also investigated, and herein report on, the use of the BAR10 rounded corners as narrow-angle occulters and compare IWA vs. contrast performance for the BAR5, BAR10, and Wedge occulters. With that, we provide recommendations for the most efficacious BAR5 and BAR10 use on-orbit in support of GO science. With color-matched PSF-template subtracted coronagraphy, inclusive of a small (+/- 1/4 pixel) 3-point cross-bar dithering strategy we recommend, we find BAR5 can deliver effective ~ 0.2" IWA image contrast of ~ 4 x 10^-5 pixel^-1 to ~ 1 x 10^-8 pixel^-1 at 2". With the pointing updates (to the PDB SIAF.dat file and/or implemented through APT) that we identified, and with observing strategies we explored, we recommend the use of STIS BAR5 coronagraphy as a fully "supported" capability for unique GO science.
  • The mass of a protoplanetary disk limits the formation and future growth of any planet. Masses of protoplanetary disks are usually calculated from measurements of the dust continuum emission by assuming an interstellar gas-to-dust ratio. To investigate the utility of CO as an alternate probe of disk mass, we use ALMA to survey $^{13}$CO and C$^{18}$O J = $3-2$ line emission from a sample of 93 protoplanetary disks around stars and brown dwarfs with masses from 0.03 -- 2 M$_{\odot}$ in the nearby Chamaeleon I star-forming region. We detect $^{13}$CO emission from 17 sources and C$^{18}$O from only one source. Gas masses for disks are then estimated by comparing the CO line luminosities to results from published disk models that include CO freeze-out and isotope-selective photodissociation. Under the assumption of a typical ISM CO-to-H$_2$ ratios of $10^{-4}$, the resulting gas masses are implausibly low, with an average gas mass of $\sim$ 0.05 M$_{Jup}$ as inferred from the average flux of stacked $^{13}$CO lines. The low gas masses and gas-to-dust ratios for Cha I disks are both consistent with similar results from disks in the Lupus star-forming region. The faint CO line emission may instead be explained if disks have much higher gas masses, but freeze-out of CO or complex C-bearing molecules is underestimated in disk models. The conversion of CO flux to CO gas mass also suffers from uncertainties in disk structures, which could affect gas temperatures. CO emission lines will only be a good tracer of the disk mass when models for C and CO depletion are confirmed to be accurate.
  • We have followed up the three Y0 dwarfs WISEPA J041022.71+150248.5, WISEPA J173835.53+273258.9 and WISEPC J205628.90+145953.3 using the UKIRT/WFCAM telescope/instruments. We find parallaxes that are more consistent and accurate than previously published values. We estimate absolute magnitudes in photometric pass-bands from $Y$ to $W3$ and find them to be consistent between the three Y0 dwarfs indicating the inherent cosmic absolute magnitude spread of these objects is small. We examine the MKO $J$ magnitudes over the four year time line and find small but significant monotonic variations. Finally we estimate physical parameters from a comparison of spectra and parallax to equilibrium and non-equilibrium models finding values consistent with solar metallicity, an effective temperature of 450-475\,K and log~g of 4.0-4.5.
  • We perform a spectroscopic survey of the foreground population in Orion A with MMT/Hectospec. We use these data, along with archival spectroscopic data and photometric data, to derive spectral types, extinction values, and masses for 691 stars. Using the Spitzer Space Telescope data, we characterize the disk properties of these sources. We identify 37 new transition disk (TD) objects, one globally depleted disk candidate, and 7 probable young debris disks. We discover an object with a mass less than 0.018-0.030 M$_{\odot}$, which harbors a flaring disk. Using the H$\alpha$ emission line, we characterize the accretion activity of the sources with disks, and confirm that fraction of accreting TDs is lower than that of optically thick disks (46$\pm$7% versus 73$\pm$9%, respectively). Using kinematic data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and APOGEE INfrared Spectroscopy of Young Nebulous Clusters program (IN-SYNC), we confirm that the foreground population shows similar kinematics to their local molecular clouds and other young stars in the same regions. Using the isochronal ages, we find that the foreground population has a median age around 1-2 Myr, which is similar to the one of other young stars in Orion A. Therefore, our results argue against the presence of a large and old foreground cluster in front of Orion A.
  • The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) near-IR channel is extensively used in time-resolved observations, especially for transiting exoplanet spectroscopy and brown dwarf and directly imaged exoplanet rotational phase mapping. The ramp effect is the dominant source of systematics in the WFC3 for time-resolved observations, which limits its photometric precision. Current mitigation strategies are based on empirical fits and require additional orbits "to help the telescope reach a thermal equilibrium". We show that the ramp effect profiles can be explained and corrected with high fidelity using charge trapping theories. We also present a model for this process that can be used to predict and to correct charge trap systematics. Our model is based on a very small number of parameters that are intrinsic to the detector. We find that these parameters are very stable between the different datasets, and we provide best-fit values. Our model is tested with more than 120 orbits ($\sim40$ visits) of WFC3 observations and is proved to be able to provide near photon noise limited corrections for observations made with both staring and scanning modes of transiting exoplanets as well as for starting-mode observations of brown dwarfs. After our model correction, the light curve of the first orbit in each visit has the same photometric precision as subsequent orbits, so data from the first orbit need no longer be discarded. Near IR arrays with the same physical characteristics (e.g., JWST/NIRCam) may also benefit from the extension of this model, if similar systematic profiles are observed.
  • Recent studies regarding the habitability, observability, and possible orbital evolution of the indirectly detected exoplanet Proxima b have mostly assumed a planet with $M \sim 1.3$ $M_\oplus$, a rocky composition, and an Earth-like atmosphere or none at all. In order to assess these assumptions, we use previous studies of the radii, masses, and compositions of super-Earth exoplanets to probabilistically constrain the mass and radius of Proxima b, assuming an isotropic inclination probability distribution. We find it is ~90% likely that the planet's density is consistent with a rocky composition; conversely, it is at least 10% likely that the planet has a significant amount of ice or an H/He envelope. If the planet does have a rocky composition, then we find expectation values and 95% confidence intervals of $\left<M\right>_\text{rocky} = 1.63_{-0.72}^{+1.66}$ $M_\oplus$ for its mass and $\left<R\right>_\text{rocky} = 1.07_{-0.31}^{+0.38}$ $R_\oplus$ for its radius.
  • The formation mechanisms and chemical compositions of brown dwarfs likely span a diverse range. If they are formed predominantly in isolation by gravitational collapse like dwarf stars then their compositions might follow those of dwarf stars, spanning a relatively narrow range in metallicities (~ -0.4 to +0.4 dex) and predominantly oxygen-rich (C/O <~ 0.7). On the other hand, giant planets in the solar system are all super-solar in metallicity ([C/H] > 0.5~dex), which is thought to be a consequence of formation by core-accretion in a circumstellar disk. In this study we determine the atmospheric chemical compositions of three brown dwarfs and find them to be neither characteristic of dwarf stars nor giant planets. We derive high-precision atmospheric chemical abundances using high-S/N HST near-infrared spectra of three mid T Dwarfs which, together with two previously studied objects, display distinctly sub-solar metallicities and span C/O ratios of 0.4-1.0. These abundance patterns indicate either an old sub-stellar population and a multitude of formation environments or objects formed in circumstellar disks followed by ejection later. We show that for a simple synthetic model population of brown dwarfs with the same spectral-type as our sample the predicted age distribution is predominantly older than the Sun and, hence, more metal poor, consistent with our derived abundances. The diverse C/O ratios we find are indicative of either different chemical reservoirs in their formation environments or different formation pathways. Our results open the possibility that cool brown dwarfs may provide important probes of early galactic chemical evolution and inhomogeneity.
  • GJ 1214b is the most studied sub-Neptune exoplanet to date. Recent measurements have shown its near-infrared transmission spectrum to be flat, pointing to a high-altitude opacity source in the exoplanet's atmosphere, either equilibrium condensate clouds or photochemical hazes. Many photometric observations have been reported in the optical by different groups, though simultaneous measurements spanning the entire optical regime are lacking. We present an optical transmission spectrum ($4,500-9,260$\AA) of GJ 1214b in 14 bins measured with Magellan/IMACS repeatedly over three transits. We measure a mean planet-to-star radius ratio of ${R_{p}/R_{s} = 0.1146\pm{2\times10^{-4}}}$ and mean uncertainty of $\sigma(R_{p}/R_{s})=8.7\times10^{-4}$ in the spectral bins. The optical transit depths are shallower on average than observed in the near-infrared. We present a model for jointly incorporating the effects of a composite photosphere and atmospheric transmission (CPAT) through the exoplanet's limb, and use it to examine the cases of absorber and temperature heterogeneities in the stellar photosphere. We find the optical and near-infrared measurements are best explained by the combination of (1) photochemical haze in the exoplanetary atmosphere with a mode particle size $r=0.1~\mu$m and haze-forming efficiency $f_{haze}=10 \%$ and (2) faculae in the unocculted stellar disk with a temperature contrast $\Delta T=354^{+46}_{-46}$ K, assuming 3.2% surface coverage. The CPAT model can be used to assess potential contributions of heterogeneous stellar photospheres to observations of exoplanet transmission spectra, which will be important for searches for spectral features in the optical.
  • In this work, we report the discovery of a candidate planetary-mass object with a photoevaporating protoplanetary disk, Proplyd 133-353, which is near the massive star $\theta^{1}$ Ori C at the center of the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC). The object was known to have extended emission pointing away from $\theta^{1}$ Ori C, indicating ongoing external photoevaporation. Our near-infrared spectroscopic data suggests that the central source of Proplyd 133-353 is substellar ($\sim$M9.5), might have a mass probably less than 13 Jupiter mass and an age younger than 0.5 Myr. Proplyd 133-353 shows a similar ratio of X-ray luminosity to stellar luminosity to other young stars in the ONC with a similar stellar luminosity, and has a similar proper motion to the mean one of confirmed ONC members. We propose that Proplyd 133-353 was formed in a very low-mass dusty cloud near $\theta^{1}$ Ori C as a second-generation of star formation, which can explain both its young age and the presence of its disk.
  • The host star metallicity provide a measure of the conditions in protoplanetary disks at the time of planet formation. Using a sample of over 20,000 Kepler stars with spectroscopic metallicities from the LAMOST survey, we explore how the exoplanet population depends on host star metallicity as a function of orbital period and planet size. We find that exoplanets with orbital periods less than 10 days are preferentially found around metal-rich stars ([Fe/H]~ 0.15 +- 0.05 dex). The occurrence rates of these hot exoplanets increases to ~30% for super-solar metallicity stars from ~10% for stars with a sub-solar metallicity. Cooler exoplanets, that resides at longer orbital periods and constitute the bulk of the exoplanet population with an occurrence rate of >~ 90%, have host-star metallicities consistent with solar. At short orbital periods, P<10 days, the difference in host star metallicity is largest for hot rocky planets (<1.7 R_Earth), where the metallicity difference is [Fe/H] =~ 0.25 +- 0.07 dex. The excess of hot rocky planets around metal-rich stars implies they either share a formation mechanism with hot Jupiters, or trace a planet trap at the protoplanetary disk inner edge which is metallicity-dependent. We do not find statistically significant evidence for a previously identified trend that small planets toward the habitable zone are preferentially found around low-metallicity stars. Refuting or confirming this trend requires a larger sample of spectroscopic metallicities.
  • Condensate clouds fundamentally impact the atmospheric structure and spectra of exoplanets and brown dwarfs but the connections between surface gravity, cloud structure, dust in the upper atmosphere, and the red colors of some brown dwarfs remain poorly understood. Rotational modulations enable the study of different clouds in the same atmosphere, thereby providing a method to isolate the effects of clouds. Here we present the discovery of high peak-to-peak amplitude (8%) rotational modulations in a low-gravity, extremely red (J-Ks=2.55) L6 dwarf WISEP J004701.06+680352.1 (W0047). Using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) time-resolved grism spectroscopy we find a best-fit rotational period (13.20$\pm$0.14 hours) with a larger amplitude at 1.1 micron than at 1.7 micron. This is the third largest near-infrared variability amplitude measured in a brown dwarf, demonstrating that large-amplitude variations are not limited to the L/T transition but are present in some extremely red L-type dwarfs. We report a tentative trend between the wavelength dependence of relative amplitude, possibly proxy for small dust grains lofted in the upper atmosphere, and the likelihood of large-amplitude variability. By assuming forsterite as haze particle, we successfully explain the wavelength dependent amplitude with submicron-sized haze particles sizes of around 0.4 {\mu}m. W0047 links the earlier spectral and later spectral type brown dwarfs in which rotational modulations have been observed, the large amplitude variations in this object make this a benchmark brown dwarf for the study of cloud properties close to the L/T transition.
  • Direct imaging allows for the detection and characterization of exoplanets via their thermal emission. We report the discovery via imaging of a young Jovian planet in a triple star system and characterize its atmospheric properties through near-infrared spectroscopy. The semi-major axis of the planet is closer relative to that of its hierarchical triple star system than for any known exoplanet within a stellar binary or triple, making HD 131399 dynamically unlike any other known system. The location of HD 131399Ab on a wide orbit in a triple system demonstrates that massive planets may be found on long and possibly unstable orbits in multi-star systems. HD 131399Ab is one of the lowest mass (4+/-1 MJup) and coldest (850+/-50 K) exoplanets to have been directly imaged.
  • We present $Spitzer$/IRAC Ch1 and Ch2 monitoring of six brown dwarfs during 8 different epochs over the course of 20 months. For four brown dwarfs, we also obtained simulataneous $HST$/WFC3 G141 Grism spectra during two epochs and derived light curves in five narrow-band filters. Probing different pressure levels in the atmospheres, the multi-wavelength light curves of our six targets all exhibit variations, and the shape of the light curves evolves over the timescale of a rotation period, ranging from 1.4 h to 13 h. We compare the shapes of the light curves and estimate the phase shifts between the light curves observed at different wavelengths by comparing the phase of the primary Fourier components. We use state-of-the-art atmosphere models to determine the flux contribution of different pressure layers to the observed flux in each filter. We find that the light curves that probe higher pressures are similar and in phase, but are offset and often different from the light curves that probe lower pressures. The phase differences between the two groups of light curves suggest that the modulations seen at lower and higher pressures may be introduced by different cloud layers.
  • WISE J104915.57-531906.1 is the nearest brown dwarf binary to our Solar system, consisting of two brown dwarfs in the L/T transition: Luhman 16A & B. In this paper we present the first map of Luhman 16A, and maps of Luhman 16B for two epochs. Our maps were created by applying Aeolus, a Markov-Chain Monte Carlo code that maps the top-of-the-atmosphere structure of brown dwarf and other ultracool atmospheres, to light curves of Luhman 16A & B using the Hubble Space Telescope's G141 and G102 grisms. Aeolus retrieved three or four spots in the top-of-the-atmosphere of Luhman 16A & B, with a surface coverage of 19%-32% (depending on an assumed rotational period of 5 hr or 8 hr) or 21%-38.5% (depending on the observational epoch) respectively. The brightness temperature of the spots of the best-fit models was ~200 K hotter than the background top-of-the-atmosphere. We compared our Luhman 16B map with the only previously published map. Interestingly, our map contained a large, cooler (DT~51 K) than the background top-of-the-atmosphere spot that lay at low latitudes, in agreement with the previous Luhman 16B map. Finally, we report the detection of a feature reappearing in Luhman 16B light curves that are separated by tens of hundreds of rotations from each other. We speculate this feature is related to top-of-the-atmosphere structures of Luhman 16B.
  • Time-resolved photometry is an important new probe of the physics of condensate clouds in extrasolar planets and brown dwarfs. Extreme adaptive optics systems can directly image planets, but precise brightness measurements are challenging. We present VLT/SPHERE high-contrast, time-resolved broad H-band near-infrared photometry for four exoplanets in the HR 8799 system, sampling changes from night to night over five nights with relatively short integrations. The photospheres of these four planets are often modeled by patchy clouds and may show large-amplitude rotational brightness modulations. Our observations provide high-quality images of the system. We present a detailed performance analysis of different data analysis approaches to accurately measure the relative brightnesses of the four exoplanets. We explore the information in satellite spots and demonstrate their use as a proxy for image quality. While the brightness variations of the satellite spots are strongly correlated, we also identify a second-order anti-correlation pattern between the different spots. Our study finds that PCA-based KLIP reduction with satellite spot-modulated artificial planet-injection based photometry (SMAP) leads to a significant (~3x) gain in photometric accuracy over standard aperture-based photometry and reaches 0.1 mag per point accuracy for our dataset, the signal-to-noise of which is limited by small field rotation. Relative planet-to-planet photometry can be compared be- tween nights, enabling observations spanning multiple nights to probe variability. Recent high-quality relative H-band photometry of the b-c planet pair agree to about 1%.