• We discuss the use of 3D printing to physically visualize (materialize) fluid flow structures. Such 3D models can serve as a refreshing hands-on means to gain deeper physical insights into the formation of complex coherent structures in fluid flows. In this short paper, we present a general procedure for taking 3D flow field data and producing a file format that can be supplied to a 3D printer, with two examples of 3D printed flow structures. A sample code to perform this process is also provided. 3D printed flow structures can not only deepen our understanding of fluid flows but also allow us to showcase our research findings to be held up-close in educational and outreach settings.
  • Direct numerical simulation is performed to study compressible, viscous flow around a circular cylinder. The present study considers two-dimensional, shock-free continuum flow by varying the Reynolds number between 20 and 100 and the freestream Mach number between 0 and 0.5. The results indicate that compressibility effects elongate the near wake for cases above and below the critical Reynolds number for two-dimensional flow under shedding. The wake elongation becomes more pronounced as the Reynolds number approaches this critical value. Moreover, we determine the growth rate and frequency of linear instability for cases above the critical Reynolds number. From the analysis, it is observed that the frequency of the B\'enard-von K\'arm\'an vortex street in the time-periodic, fully-saturated flow increases from the dominant unstable frequency found from the linear stability analysis as the Reynolds number increases from its critical value, even for the low range of Reynolds numbers considered. We also notice that the compressibility effects reduce the growth rate and dominant frequency in the linear growth stage. Semi-empirical functional relationships for the growth rate and the dominant frequency in linearized flow around the cylinder in terms of the Reynolds number and freestream Mach number are presented.