• Fitting the continuum component of a quasar spectrum in UV/optical band is challenging due to contamination of numerous emission lines. Traditional fitting algorithms such as the least-square fitting and the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA) are fast but are sensitive to initial values of fitting parameters. They cannot guarantee to find global optimum solutions when the object functions have multiple minima. In this work, we attempt to fit a typical quasar spectrum using the Covariance Matrix Adaptation Evolution Strategy (CMA-ES). The spectrum is generated by composing a number of real quasar spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasar catalog data release 3 (DR3) so it has a higher signal-to-noise ratio. The CMA-ES algorithm is an evolutionary algorithm that is designed to find the global rather than the local minima. The algorithm we implemented achieves an improved fitting result than the LMA and unlike the LMA, it is independent of initial parameter values. We are looking forward to implementing this algorithm to real quasar spectra in UV/optical band.
  • At present, the precision of deep ultraviolet photometry is somewhat limited by the dearth of faint ultraviolet standard stars. In an effort to improve this situation, we present a uniform catalog of eleven new faint (u sim17) ultraviolet standard stars. High-precision photometry of these stars has been taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and Galaxy Evolution Explorer and combined with new data from the Swift Ultraviolet Optical Telescope to provide precise photometric measures extending from the Near Infrared to the Far Ultraviolet. These stars were chosen because they are known to be hot (20,000 < T_eff < 50,000 K) DA white dwarfs with published Sloan spectra that should be photometrically stable. This careful selection allows us to compare the combined photometry and Sloan spectroscopy to models of pure hydrogen atmospheres to both constrain the underlying properties of the white dwarfs and test the ability of white dwarf models to predict the photometric measures. We find that the photometry provides good constraint on white dwarf temperatures, which demonstrates the ability of Swift/UVOT to investigate the properties of hot luminous stars. We further find that the models reproduce the photometric measures in all eleven passbands to within their systematic uncertainties. Within the limits of our photometry, we find the standard stars to be photometrically stable. This success indicates that the models can be used to calibrate additional filters to our standard system, permitting easier comparison of photometry from heterogeneous sources. The largest source of uncertainty in the model fitting is the uncertainty in the foreground reddening curve, a problem that is especially acute in the UV.
  • We present the fifth edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog, which is based upon the SDSS Seventh Data Release. The catalog, which contains 105,783 spectroscopically confirmed quasars, represents the conclusion of the SDSS-I and SDSS-II quasar survey. The catalog consists of the SDSS objects that have luminosities larger than M_i = -22.0 (in a cosmology with H_0 = 70 km/s/Mpc Omega_M = 0.3, and Omega_Lambda = 0.7) have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km/s or have interesting/complex absorption features, are fainter than i > 15.0 and have highly reliable redshifts. The catalog covers an area of 9380 deg^2. The quasar redshifts range from 0.065 to 5.46, with a median value of 1.49; the catalog includes 1248 quasars at redshifts greater than four, of which 56 are at redshifts greater than five. The catalog contains 9210 quasars with i < 18; slightly over half of the entries have i< 19. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.1" rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra cover the wavelength region 3800-9200 Ang. at a spectral resolution R = 2000 the spectra can be retrieved from the SDSS public database using the information provided in the catalog. Over 96% of the objects in the catalog were discovered by the SDSS. We also include a supplemental list of an additional 207 quasars with SDSS spectra whose archive photometric information is incomplete.
  • We use UV/optical and X-ray observations of 272 radio-quiet Type 1 AGNs and quasars to investigate the CIV Baldwin Effect (BEff). The UV/optical spectra are drawn from the Hubble Space Telescope, International Ultraviolet Explorer and Sloan Digital Sky Survey archives. The X-ray spectra are from the Chandra and XMM-Newton archives. We apply correlation and partial-correlation analyses to the equivalent widths, continuum monochromatic luminosities, and alpha_ox, which characterizes the relative X-ray to UV brightness. The equivalent width of the CIV 1549 emission line is correlated with both alpha_ox and luminosity. We find that by regressing l_UV with EW(CIV) and alpha_ox, we can obtain tighter correlations than by regressing l_UV with only EW(CIV). Both correlation and regression analyses imply that l_UV is not the only factor controlling the changes of EW(CIV); alpha_ox (or, equivalently, the soft X-ray emission) plays a fundamental role in the formation and variation of CIV. Variability contributes at least 60% of the scatter of the EW(CIV)-l_UV relation and at least 75% of the scatter of the of the EW(CIV)-alpha_ox relation. In our sample, narrow Fe Kalpha 6.4 keV emission lines are detected in 50 objects. Although narrow Fe Kalpha exhibits a BEff similar to that of CIV, its equivalent width has almost no dependence on either alpha_ox or EW(CIV). This suggests that the majority of narrow Fe Kalpha emission is unlikely to be produced in the broad emission-line region. We do find suggestive correlations between the emission-line luminosities of CIV and Fe Kalpha, which could be potentially used to estimate the detectability of the Fe Kalpha line of quasars from rest-frame UV spectroscopic observations.
  • We present measurements of the quasar two-point correlation function, \xi_{Q}, over the redshift range z=0.3-2.2 based upon data from the SDSS. Using a homogeneous sample of 30,239 quasars with spectroscopic redshifts from the DR5 Quasar Catalogue, our study represents the largest sample used for this type of investigation to date. With this redshift range and an areal coverage of approx 4,000 deg^2, we sample over 25 h^-3 Gpc^3 (comoving) assuming the current LCDM cosmology. Over this redshift range, we find that the redshift-space correlation function, xi(s), is adequately fit by a single power-law, with s_{0}=5.95+/-0.45 h^-1 Mpc and \gamma_{s}=1.16+0.11-0.16 when fit over s=1-25 h^-1 Mpc. Using the projected correlation function we calculate the real-space correlation length, r_{0}=5.45+0.35-0.45 h^-1 Mpc and \gamma=1.90+0.04-0.03, over scales of rp=1-130 h^-1 Mpc. Dividing the sample into redshift slices, we find very little, if any, evidence for the evolution of quasar clustering, with the redshift-space correlation length staying roughly constant at s_{0} ~ 6-7 h^-1 Mpc at z<2.2 (and only increasing at redshifts greater than this). Comparing our clustering measurements to those reported for X-ray selected AGN at z=0.5-1, we find reasonable agreement in some cases but significantly lower correlation lengths in others. We find that the linear bias evolves from b~1.4 at z=0.5 to b~3 at z=2.2, with b(z=1.27)=2.06+/-0.03 for the full sample. We compare our data to analytical models and infer that quasars inhabit dark matter haloes of constant mass M ~2 x 10^12 h^-1 M_Sol from redshifts z~2.5 (the peak of quasar activity) to z~0. [ABRIDGED]
  • Using a homogenous sample of 38,208 quasars with a sky coverage of $4000 {\rm deg^2}$ drawn from the SDSS Data Release Five quasar catalog, we study the dependence of quasar clustering on luminosity, virial black hole mass, quasar color, and radio loudness. At $z<2.5$, quasar clustering depends weakly on luminosity and virial black hole mass, with typical uncertainty levels $\sim 10%$ for the measured correlation lengths. These weak dependences are consistent with models in which substantial scatter between quasar luminosity, virial black hole mass and the host dark matter halo mass has diluted any clustering difference, where halo mass is assumed to be the relevant quantity that best correlates with clustering strength. However, the most luminous and most massive quasars are more strongly clustered (at the $\sim 2\sigma$ level) than the remainder of the sample, which we attribute to the rapid increase of the bias factor at the high-mass end of host halos. We do not observe a strong dependence of clustering strength on quasar colors within our sample. On the other hand, radio-loud quasars are more strongly clustered than are radio-quiet quasars matched in redshift and optical luminosity (or virial black hole mass), consistent with local observations of radio galaxies and radio-loud type 2 AGN. Thus radio-loud quasars reside in more massive and denser environments in the biased halo clustering picture. Using the Sheth et al.(2001) formula for the linear halo bias, the estimated host halo mass for radio-loud quasars is $\sim 10^{13} h^{-1}M_\odot$, compared to $\sim 2\times 10^{12} h^{-1}M_\odot$ for radio-quiet quasar hosts at $z\sim 1.5$.
  • We review recent UV observations of core-collapse supernovae (SNe) with the Swift Ultra-violet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) during its first two years. Rest-frame UV photometry is useful for differentiating SN types by exploiting the UV-optical spectral shape and more subtle UV features. This is useful for the real-time classification of local and high-redshift SNe using only photometry. Two remarkable SNe Ib/c were observed with UVOT -- SN2006jc was a UV bright SN Ib. Swift observations of GRB060218/SN2006aj began shortly after the explosion and show a UV-bright peak followed by a UV-faint SN bump. UV observations are also useful for constraining the temperature and ionization structure of SNe IIP. Rest-frame UV observations of all types are important for understanding the extinction, temperature, and bolometric luminosity of SNe and to interpret the observations of high redshift SNe observed at optical wavelengths.
  • We present the fourth edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog contains 77,429 objects; this is an increase of over 30,000 entries since the previous edition. The catalog consists of the objects in the SDSS Fifth Data Release that have luminosities larger than M_i = -22.0 (in a cosmology with H_0 = 70 km/s/Mpc, Omega_M = 0.3, and Omega_Lambda = 0.7) have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km/s, or have interesting/complex absorption features, are fainter than i=15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The area covered by the catalog is 5740 sq. deg. The quasar redshifts range from 0.08 to 5.41, with a median value of 1.48; the catalog includes 891 quasars at redshifts greater than four, of which 36 are at redshifts greater than five. Approximately half of the catalog quasars have i < 19; nearly all have i < 21. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.2 arcsec. rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains basic radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra cover the wavelength region 3800--9200A at a spectral resolution of ~2000. The spectra can be retrieved from the public database using the information provided in the catalog. The average SDSS colors of quasars as a function of redshift, derived from the catalog entries, are presented in tabular form. Approximately 96% of the objects in the catalog were discovered by the SDSS.
  • (Abridged) We study the two-point correlation function of a uniformly selected sample of 4,426 luminous optical quasars with redshift $2.9 \le z\le 5.4$ selected over 4041 deg$^2$ from the Fifth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. For a real-space correlation function of the form $\xi(r)=(r/r_0)^{-\gamma}$, the fitted parameters in comoving coordinates are $r_0 = 15.2 \pm 2.7 h^{-1}$ Mpc and $\gamma = 2.0 \pm 0.3$, over a scale range $4\le r_p\le 150 h^{-1}$ Mpc. Thus high-redshift quasars are appreciably more strongly clustered than their $z \approx 1.5$ counterparts, which have a comoving clustering length $r_0 \approx 6.5 h^{-1}$ Mpc. Dividing our sample into two redshift bins: $2.9\le z\le 3.5$ and $z\ge 3.5$, and assuming a power-law index $\gamma=2.0$, we find a correlation length of $r_0 = 16.9 \pm 1.7 h^{-1}$ Mpc for the former, and $r_0 = 24.3 \pm 2.4 h^{-1}$ Mpc for the latter. Following Martini & Weinberg, we relate the clustering strength and quasar number density to the quasar lifetimes and duty cycle. Using the Sheth & Tormen halo mass function, the quasar lifetime is estimated to lie in the range $4\sim 50$ Myr for quasars with $2.9\le z\le 3.5$; and $30\sim 600$ Myr for quasars with $z\ge 3.5$. The corresponding duty cycles are $0.004\sim 0.05$ for the lower redshift bin and $0.03\sim 0.6$ for the higher redshift bin. The minimum mass of halos in which these quasars reside is $2-3\times 10^{12}\ h^{-1}M_\odot$ for quasars with $2.9\le z\le 3.5$ and $4-6\times 10^{12}\ h^{-1}M_\odot$ for quasars with $z\ge 3.5$.
  • We present a time-variability analysis of 29 broad absorption line quasars (BALQSOs) observed in two epochs by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). These spectra are selected from a larger sample of BALQSOs with multiple observations by virtue of exhibiting a broad CIV $\lambda$1549 absorption trough separated from the rest frame of the associated emission peak by more than 3600 km s$^{-1}$. Detached troughs facilitate higher precision variability measurements, since the measurement of the absorption in these objects is not complicated by variation in the emission line flux. We have undertaken a statistical analysis of these detached-trough BALQSO spectra to explore the relationships between BAL features that are seen to vary and the dynamics of emission from the quasar central engine. We have measured variability within our sample, which includes three strongly variable BALs. We have also verified that the statistical behavior of the overall sample agrees with current model predictions and previous studies of BAL variability. Specifically, we observe that the strongest BAL variability occurs among the smallest equivalent width features and at velocities exceeding 12,000 km s$^{-1}$, as predicted by recent disk-wind modeling.
  • We present an analysis of the mid-infrared (MIR) and optical properties of type 1 (broad-line) quasars detected by the Spitzer Space Telescope. The MIR color-redshift relation is characterized to z=3, with predictions to z=7. We demonstrate how combining MIR and optical colors can yield even more efficient selection of active galactic nuclei (AGN) than MIR or optical colors alone. Composite spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are constructed for 259 quasars with both Sloan Digital Sky Survey and Spitzer photometry, supplemented by near-IR, GALEX, VLA and ROSAT data where available. We discuss how the spectral diversity of quasars influences the determination of bolometric luminosities and accretion rates; assuming the mean SED can lead to errors as large as a factor of 2 for individual quasars. Finally, we show that careful consideration of the shape of the mean quasar SED and its redshift dependence leads to a lower estimate of the fraction of reddened/obscured AGNs missed by optical surveys as compared to estimates derived from a single mean MIR to optical flux ratio.
  • We present the results of a search for metal absorption lines in the spectra of background QSOs whose sightlines pass close to foreground QSOs. We detect MgII(2796,2803) absorption in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectra of four z>1.5 QSOs whose lines of sight pass within 26-98 kpc of lower redshift (z~0.5-1.5) QSOs. The 100% [4/4 pairs] detection of MgII in the background QSOs is clearly at odds with the incidence of associated (z_abs ~ z_em) systems -- absorbers which exist towards only a few percent of QSOs. Although the quality of our foreground QSO spectra is not as high as the SDSS data, absorption seen towards one of the background QSOs clearly does not show up at the same strength in the spectrum of the corresponding foreground QSO. This implies that the absorbing gas is distributed inhomogeneously around the QSO, presumably as a direct consequence of the anisotropic emission from the central AGN. We discuss possible origins for the MgII lines, including: absorption by gas from the foreground QSO host galaxy; companion galaxies fuelling the QSO through gravitational interactions; and tidal debris left by galaxy mergers or interactions which initiated the QSO activity. No single explanation is entirely satisfactory, and we may well be seeing a mixture of phenomena.
  • We present a total of 4784 unique broad absorption line quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Third Data Release. An automated algorithm was used to match a continuum to each quasar and to identify regions of flux at least 10% below the continuum over a velocity range of at least 1000 km/s in the CIV and MgII absorption regions. The model continuum was selected as the best-fit match from a set of template quasar spectra binned in luminosity, emission line width, and redshift, with the power-law spectral index and amount of dust reddening as additional free parameters. We characterize our sample through the traditional ``balnicity'' index and a revised absorption index, as well as through parameters such as the width, outflow velocity, fractional depth and number of troughs. From a sample of 16883 quasars at 1.7<z<4.38, we identify 4386 (26.0%) quasars with broad CIV absorption, of which 1756 (10.4%) satisfy traditional selection criteria. From a sample of 34973 quasars at 0.5<z<2.15, we identify 457 (1.31%) quasars with broad MgII absorption, 191 (0.55%) of which satisfy traditional selection criteria. We also provide a supplementary list of 39 visually identified z>4.38 quasars with broad CIV absorption. We find that broad absorption line quasars may have broader emission lines on average than other quasars.
  • We determine the number counts and z=0-5 luminosity function for a well-defined, homogeneous sample of quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We conservatively define the most uniform statistical sample possible, consisting of 15,343 quasars within an effective area of 1622 deg^2 that was derived from a parent sample of 46,420 spectroscopically confirmed broad-line quasars in the 5282 deg^2 of imaging data from SDSS Data Release Three. The sample extends from i=15 to i=19.1 at z<3 and to i=20.2 for z>3. The number counts and luminosity function agree well with the results of the 2dF QSO Survey, but the SDSS data probe to much higher redshifts than does the 2dF sample. The number density of luminous quasars peaks between redshifts 2 and 3, although uncertainties in the selection function in this range do not allow us to determine the peak redshift more precisely. Our best fit model has a flatter bright end slope at high redshift than at low redshift. For z<2.4 the data are best fit by a redshift-independent slope of beta = -3.1 (Phi(L) propto L^beta). Above z=2.4 the slope flattens with redshift to beta=-2.37 at z=5. This slope change, which is significant at a >5-sigma level, must be accounted for in models of the evolution of accretion onto supermassive black holes.
  • In this paper, we present Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry and spectroscopy in the fields of 24 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by Swift, including bursts localized by Swift, HETE-2, and INTEGRAL, after December 2004. After this bulk release, we plan to provide individual releases of similar data shortly after the localization of future bursts falling in the SDSS survey area. These data provide a solid basis for the astrometric and photometric calibration of follow-up afterglow searches and monitoring. Furthermore, the images provided with this release will allow observers to find transient objects up to a magnitude fainter than possible with Digitized Sky Survey image comparisons.
  • We present new measurements of the quasar autocorrelation from a sample of \~80,000 photometrically-classified quasars taken from SDSS DR1. We find a best-fit model of $\omega(\theta) = (0.066\pm^{0.026}_{0.024})\theta^{-(0.98\pm0.15)}$ for the angular autocorrelation, consistent with estimates from spectroscopic quasar surveys. We show that only models with little or no evolution in the clustering of quasars in comoving coordinates since z~1.4 can recover a scale-length consistent with local galaxies and Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs). A model with little evolution of quasar clustering in comoving coordinates is best explained in the current cosmological paradigm by rapid evolution in quasar bias. We show that quasar biasing must have changed from b_Q~3 at a (photometric) redshift of z=2.2 to b_Q~1.2-1.3 by z=0.75. Such a rapid increase with redshift in biasing implies that quasars at z~2 cannot be the progenitors of modern L* objects, rather they must now reside in dense environments, such as clusters. Similarly, the duration of the UVX quasar phase must be short enough to explain why local UVX quasars reside in essentially unbiased structures. Our estimates of b_Q are in good agreement with recent spectroscopic results, which demonstrate the implied evolution in b_Q is consistent with quasars inhabiting halos of similar mass at every redshift. Treating quasar clustering as a function of both redshift and luminosity, we find no evidence for luminosity dependence in quasar clustering, and that redshift evolution thus affects quasar clustering more than changes in quasars' luminosity. We provide a new method for quantifying stellar contamination in photometrically-classified quasar catalogs via the correlation function.
  • Using an eigenspectrum decomposition technique, we separate the host galaxy from the broad line active galactic nucleus (AGN) in a set of 4666 spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), from redshifts near zero up to about 0.75. The decomposition technique uses separate sets of galaxy and quasar eigenspectra to efficiently and reliably separate the AGN and host spectroscopic components. The technique accurately reproduces the host galaxy spectrum, its contributing fraction, and its classification. We show how the accuracy of the decomposition depends upon S/N, host galaxy fraction, and the galaxy class. Based on the eigencoefficients, the sample of SDSS broad-line AGN host galaxies spans a wide range of spectral types, but the distribution differs significantly from inactive galaxies. In particular, post-starburst activity appears to be much more common among AGN host galaxies. The luminosities of the hosts are much higher than expected for normal early-type galaxies, and their colors become increasingly bluer than early-type galaxies with increasing host luminosity. Most of the AGNs with detected hosts are emitting at between 1% and 10% of their estimated Eddington luminosities, but the sensitivity of the technique usually does not extend to the Eddington limit. There are mild correlations among the AGN and host galaxy eigencoefficients, possibly indicating a link between recent star formation and the onset of AGN activity. The catalog of spectral reconstruction parameters is available as an electronic table.
  • Using Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasar spectra taken at multiple epochs, we find that the composite flux density differences in the rest frame wavelength range 1300-6000 AA can be fit by a standard thermal accretion disk model where the accretion rate has changed from one epoch to the next (without considering additional continuum emission components). The fit to the composite residual has two free parameters: a normalizing constant and the average characteristic temperature $\bar{T}^*$. In turn the characteristic temperature is dependent on the ratio of the mass accretion rate to the square of the black hole mass. We therefore conclude that most of the UV/optical variability may be due to processes involving the disk, and thus that a significant fraction of the UV/optical spectrum may come directly from the disk.
  • We discuss the UV, optical, and IR properties of the SDSS sources detected by GALEX as part of its All-sky Imaging Survey Early Release Observations. Virtually all of the GALEX sources in the overlap region are detected by SDSS. GALEX sources represent ~2.5% of all SDSS sources within these fields and about half are optically unresolved. Most unresolved GALEX/SDSS sources are bright blue turn-off thick disk stars and are typically detected only in the GALEX near-UV band. The remaining unresolved sources include low-redshift quasars, white dwarfs, and white dwarf/M dwarf pairs, and these dominate the optically unresolved sources detected in both GALEX bands. Almost all the resolved SDSS sources detected by GALEX are fainter than the SDSS 'main' spectroscopic limit. These sources have colors consistent with those of blue (spiral) galaxies (u-r<2.2), and most are detected in both GALEX bands. Measurements of their UV colors allow much more accurate and robust estimates of star-formation history than are possible using only SDSS data. Indeed, galaxies with the most recent (<20 Myr) star formation can be robustly selected from the GALEX data by requiring that they be brighter in the far-UV than in the near-UV band. However, older starburst galaxies have UV colors similar to AGN, and thus cannot be selected unambiguously on the basis of GALEX fluxes alone. With the aid of 2MASS data, we construct and discuss median 10 band UV-optical-IR spectral energy distributions for turn-off stars, hot white dwarfs, low-redshift quasars, and spiral and elliptical galaxies. We point out the high degree of correlation between the UV color and the contribution of the UV flux to the UV-optical-IR flux of galaxies detected by GALEX.
  • Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) repeat spectroscopic observations have resulted in multiple-epoch spectroscopy for roughly 2500 quasars observed more than 50 days apart. From this sample, we identify 315 quasars that have varied significantly between observations. We create an ensemble difference spectrum (bright phase minus faint phase) covering rest-frame wavelengths from 1000 to 6000 Angstroms. This average difference spectrum is bluer than the average single-epoch quasar spectrum; a power-law fit to the difference spectrum yields a spectral index alpha_lambda = -2.00, compared to an index of alpha_lambda = -1.35 for the single-epoch spectrum. The strongest emission lines vary only 30% as much as the continuum. Due to the lack of variability of the lines, measured photometric color is not always bluer in brighter phases, but depends on redshift and the filters used. Lastly, the difference spectrum is bluer than the ensemble quasar spectrum only for lambda_rest < 2500 Angstroms, indicating that the variability cannot result from a simple scaling of the average quasar spectrum.
  • Spectra of nearly 20000 point-like objects to a Galactic reddening corrected magnitude of i=19.1 have been obtained to test the completeness of the SDSS quasar survey. The spatially-unresolved objects were selected from all regions of color space, sparsely sampled from within a 278 sq. deg. area of sky covered by this study. Only ten quasars were identified that were not targeted as candidates by the SDSS quasar survey (including both color and radio source selection). The inferred density of unresolved quasars on the sky that are missed by the SDSS algorithm is 0.44 per sq. deg, compared to 8.28 per sq. deg. for the selected quasar density, giving a completeness of 94.9(+2.6,-3.8) to the limiting magnitude. Omitting radio selection reduces the color-only selection completeness by about 1%. Of the ten newly identified quasars, three have detected broad absorption line systems, six are significantly redder than other quasars at the same redshift, and four have redshifts between 2.7 and 3.0 (the redshift range where the SDSS colors of quasars intersect the stellar locus). The fraction of quasars missed due to image defects and blends is approximately 4%, but this number varies by a few percent with magnitude. Quasars with extended images comprise about 6% of the SDSS sample, and the completeness of the selection algorithm for extended quasars is approximately 81%, based on the SDSS galaxy survey. The combined end-to-end completeness for the SDSS quasar survey is approximately 89%. The total corrected density of quasars on the sky to i=19.1 is estimated to be 10.2 per sq. deg.
  • The Grist project (http://grist.caltech.edu/) is developing a grid-technology based system as a research environment for astronomy with massive and complex datasets. This knowledge extraction system will consist of a library of distributed grid services controlled by a workflow system, compliant with standards emerging from the grid computing, web services, and virtual observatory communities. This new technology is being used to find high redshift quasars, study peculiar variable objects, search for transients in real time, and fit SDSS QSO spectra to measure black hole masses. Grist services are also a component of the ``hyperatlas'' project to serve high-resolution multi-wavelength imagery over the Internet. In support of these science and outreach objectives, the Grist framework will provide the enabling fabric to tie together distributed grid services in the areas of data access, federation, mining, subsetting, source extraction, image mosaicking, statistics, and visualization.
  • We present a catalog of 100,563 unresolved, UV-excess (UVX) quasar candidates to g=21 from 2099 deg^2 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release One (DR1) imaging data. Existing spectra of 22,737 sources reveals that 22,191 (97.6%) are quasars; accounting for the magnitude dependence of this efficiency, we estimate that 95,502 (95.0%) of the objects in the catalog are quasars. Such a high efficiency is unprecedented in broad-band surveys of quasars. This ``proof-of-concept'' sample is designed to be maximally efficient, but still has 94.7% completeness to unresolved, g<~19.5, UVX quasars from the DR1 quasar catalog. This efficient and complete selection is the result of our application of a probability density type analysis to training sets that describe the 4-D color distribution of stars and spectroscopically confirmed quasars in the SDSS. Specifically, we use a non-parametric Bayesian classification, based on kernel density estimation, to parameterize the color distribution of astronomical sources -- allowing for fast and robust classification. We further supplement the catalog by providing photometric redshifts and matches to FIRST/VLA, ROSAT, and USNO-B sources. Future work needed to extend the this selection algorithm to larger redshifts, fainter magnitudes, and resolved sources is discussed. Finally, we examine some science applications of the catalog, particularly a tentative quasar number counts distribution covering the largest range in magnitude (14.2<g<21.0) ever made within the framework of a single quasar survey.
  • We explore the form of extragalactic reddening toward quasars using a sample of 9566 quasars with redshifts 0<z<2.2, and accurate optical colors from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We confirm that dust reddening is the primary explanation for the red ``tail'' of the color distribution of SDSS quasars. Our fitting to 5-band photometry normalized by the modal quasar color as a function of redshift shows that this ``tail'' is well described by SMC-like reddening but not by LMC-like, Galactic, or Gaskell et al. (2004) reddening. Extension to longer wavelengths using a subset of 1886 SDSS-2MASS matches confirms these results at high significance. We carry out Monte-Carlo simulations that match the observed distribution of quasar spectral energy distributions using a Lorentzian dust reddening distribution; 2% of quasars selected by the main SDSS targeting algorithm (i.e., which are not extincted out of the sample) have E_{B-V} > 0.1; less than 1% have E_{B-V} > 0.2, where the extinction is relative to quasars with modal colors. Reddening is uncorrelated with the presence of intervening narrow-line absorption systems, but reddened quasars are much more likely to show narrow absorption at the redshift of the quasar than are unreddened quasars. Thus the reddening towards quasars is dominated by SMC-like dust at the quasar redshift.
  • The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has discovered a z=2.4917 radio-loud active galactic nucleus (AGN) with a luminous, variable, low-polarization UV continuum, H I two-photon emission, and a moderately broad Lyman-alpha line (FWHM = 1430 km/s) but without obvious metal-line emission. SDSS J113658.36+024220.1 does have associated metal-line absorption in three distinct, narrow systems spanning a velocity range of 2710 km/s. Despite certain spectral similarities, SDSS J1136+0242 is not a Lyman-break galaxy. Instead, the Ly-alpha and two-photon emission can be attributed to an extended, low-metallicity narrow-line region. The unpolarized continuum argues that we see SDSS J1136+0242 very close to the axis of any ionization cone present. We can conceive of two plausible explanations for why we see a strong UV continuum but no broad-line emission in this `face-on radio galaxy' model for SDSS J1136+0242: the continuum could be relativistically beamed synchrotron emission which swamps the broad-line emission; or, more likely, SDSS J1136+0242 could be similar to PG 1407+265, a quasar in which for some unknown reason the high-ionization emission lines are very broad, very weak, and highly blueshifted.