• The combination of galaxy-galaxy lensing (GGL) with galaxy clustering is one of the most promising routes to determining the amplitude of matter clustering at low redshifts. We show that extending clustering+GGL analyses from the linear regime down to $\sim 0.5 \, h^{-1}$ Mpc scales increases their constraining power considerably, even after marginalizing over a flexible model of non-linear galaxy bias. Using a grid of cosmological N-body simulations, we construct a Taylor-expansion emulator that predicts the galaxy autocorrelation $\xi_{\text{gg}}(r)$ and galaxy-matter cross-correlation $\xi_{\text{gm}}(r)$ as a function of $\sigma_8$, $\Omega_m$, and halo occupation distribution (HOD) parameters, which are allowed to vary with large scale environment to represent possible effects of galaxy assembly bias. We present forecasts for a fiducial case that corresponds to BOSS LOWZ galaxy clustering and SDSS-depth weak lensing (effective source density $\sim 0.3$ arcmin$^{-2}$). Using tangential shear and projected correlation function measurements over $0.5 \leq r_p \leq 30 \, h^{-1}$ Mpc yields a 1.8% constraint on the parameter combination $\sigma_8\Omega_m^{0.58}$, a factor of two better than a constraint that excludes non-linear scales ($r_p > 2 \, h^{-1}$ Mpc, $4 \, h^{-1}$ Mpc for $\gamma_t,w_p$). Much of this improvement comes from the non-linear clustering information, which breaks degeneracies among HOD parameters that would otherwise degrade the inference of matter clustering from GGL. Increasing the effective source density to $3$ arcmin$^{-2}$ sharpens the constraint on $\sigma_8\Omega_m^{0.58}$ by a further factor of two. With robust modeling into the non-linear regime, low-redshift measurements of matter clustering at the 1-percent level with clustering+GGL alone are well within reach of current data sets such as those provided by the Dark Energy Survey.
  • We have developed an analytical method based on forward-modeling techniques to characterize the high-mass end of the red sequence (RS) galaxy population at redshift $z\sim0.55$, from the DR10 BOSS CMASS spectroscopic sample, which comprises $\sim600,000$ galaxies. The method, which follows an unbinned maximum likelihood approach, allows the deconvolution of the intrinsic CMASS colour-colour-magnitude distributions from photometric errors and selection effects. This procedure requires modeling the covariance matrix for the i-band magnitude, g-r colour and r-i colour using Stripe 82 multi-epoch data. Our results indicate that the error-deconvolved intrinsic RS distribution is consistent, within the photometric uncertainties, with a single point ($<0.05~{\rm{mag}}$) in the colour-colour plane at fixed magnitude, for a narrow redshift slice. We have computed the high-mass end ($^{0.55}M_i \lesssim -22$) of the $^{0.55}i$-band RS Luminosity Function (RS LF) in several redshift slices within the redshift range $0.52<z<0.63$. In this narrow redshift range, the evolution of the RS LF is consistent, within the uncertainties in the modeling, with a passively-evolving model with $\Phi_* = (7.248 \pm 0.204) \times10^{-4}$ Mpc$^{-3}$ mag$^{-1}$, fading at a rate of $1.5\pm0.4$ mag per unit redshift. We report RS completeness as a function of magnitude and redshift in the CMASS sample, which will facilitate a variety of galaxy-evolution and clustering studies using BOSS. Our forward-modeling method lays the foundations for future studies using other dark-energy surveys like eBOSS or DESI, which are affected by the same type of photometric blurring/selection effects.
  • We address the question of whether massive red and blue galaxies trace the same large-scale structure at z~0.6 using the CMASS sample of galaxies from Data Release 12 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. After splitting the catalog into subsamples of red and blue galaxies using a simple colour cut, we measure the clustering of both subsamples and construct the correlation coefficient, r, using two statistics. The correlation coefficient quantifies the stochasticity between the two subsamples, which we examine over intermediate scales (20 < R < 100 Mpc/h). We find that on these intermediate scales, the correlation coefficient is consistent with 1; in particular, we find r > 0.95 taking into account both statistics and r > 0.974 using the favored statistic.
  • We introduce a new method for estimating the covariance matrix for the galaxy correlation function in surveys of large-scale structure. Our method combines simple theoretical results with a realistic characterization of the survey to dramatically reduce noise in the covariance matrix. For example, with an investment of only ~1,000 CPU hours we can produce a model covariance matrix with noise levels that would otherwise require ~35,000 mocks. Non-Gaussian contributions to the model are calibrated against mock catalogs, after which the model covariance is found to be in impressive agreement with the mock covariance matrix. Since calibration of this method requires fewer mocks than brute force approaches, we believe that it could dramatically reduce the number of mocks required to analyse future surveys.
  • We study the evidence for a connection between active galactic nuclei (AGN) fueling and star formation by investigating the relationship between the X-ray luminosities of AGN and the star formation rates (SFRs) of their host galaxies. We identify a sample of 309 AGN with $10^{41}<L_\mathrm{X}<10^{44} $ erg s$^{-1}$ at $0.2 < z < 1.2$ in the PRIMUS redshift survey. We find AGN in galaxies with a wide range of SFR at a given $L_X$. We do not find a significant correlation between SFR and the observed instantaneous $L_X$ for star forming AGN host galaxies. However, there is a weak but significant correlation between the mean $L_\mathrm{X}$ and SFR of detected AGN in star forming galaxies, which likely reflects that $L_\mathrm{X}$ varies on shorter timescales than SFR. We find no correlation between stellar mass and $L_\mathrm{X}$ within the AGN population. Within both populations of star forming and quiescent galaxies, we find a similar power-law distribution in the probability of hosting an AGN as a function of specific accretion rate. Furthermore, at a given stellar mass, we find a star forming galaxy $\sim2-3$ more likely than a quiescent galaxy to host an AGN of a given specific accretion rate. The probability of a galaxy hosting an AGN is constant across the main sequence of star formation. These results indicate that there is an underlying connection between star formation and the presence of AGN, but AGN are often hosted by quiescent galaxies.
  • (Abridged) We detect the large-scale structure of Lya emission in the Universe at redshifts z=2-3.5 by measuring the cross-correlation of Lya surface brightness with quasars in SDSS/BOSS. We use a million spectra targeting Luminous Red Galaxies at z<0.8, after subtracting a best fit model galaxy spectrum from each one, as an estimate of the high-redshift Lya surface brightness. The quasar-Lya emission cross-correlation we detect has a shape consistent with a LambdaCDM model with Omega_M =0.30^+0.10-0.07. The predicted amplitude of this cross-correlation is proportional to the product of the mean Lya surface brightness, <mu_alpha>, the amplitude of mass fluctuations, and the quasar and Lya emission bias factors. Using known values, we infer <mu_alpha>(b_alpha/3) = (3.9 +/- 0.9) x 10^-21 erg/s cm^-2 A^-1 arcsec^-2, where b_alpha is the Lya emission bias factor. If the dominant sources of Lya emission are star forming galaxies, we infer rho_SFR = (0.28 +/- 0.07) (3/b_alpha) /yr/Mpc^3 at z=2-3.5. For b_alpha=3, this value is a factor of 21-35 above previous estimates from individually detected Lya emitters, although consistent with the total rho_SFR derived from dust-corrected, continuum UV surveys. 97% of the Lya emission in the Universe at these redshifts is therefore undetected in previous surveys of Lya emitters. Our measurement is much greater than seen from stacking analyses of faint halos surrounding previously detected Lya emitters, but we speculate that it arises from similar Lya halos surrounding all luminous star-forming galaxies. We also detect redshift space anisotropy of the quasar-Lya emission cross-correlation, finding evidence at the 3.0 sigma level that it is radially elongated, consistent with distortions caused by radiative-transfer effects (Zheng et al. (2011)). Our measurements represent the first application of the intensity mapping technique to optical observations.
  • We develop a configuration-space picture of the relative velocity between baryons and dark matter that clearly explains how it can shift the BAO scale in the galaxy-galaxy correlation function. The shift occurs because the relative velocity is non-zero only within the sound horizon and thus adds to the correlation function asymmetrically about the BAO peak. We further show that in configuration space the relative velocity has a localized, distinctive signature in the three-point galaxy correlation function (3PCF). In particular, we find that a multipole decomposition is a favorable way to isolate the relative velocity in the 3PCF, and that there is a strong signature in the l=1 multipole for triangles with 2 sides around the BAO scale. Finally, we investigate a further compression of the 3PCF to a function of only one triangle side that preserves the localized nature of the relative velocity signature while also nicely separating linear from non-linear bias. We expect that this scheme will substantially lessen the computational burden of finding the relative velocity in the 3PCF. The relative velocity's 3PCF signature can be used to correct the shift induced in the galaxy-galaxy correlation function so that no systematic error due to this effect is introduced into the BAO as used for precision cosmology.
  • The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) is a massively multiplexed fiber-fed spectrograph that will make the next major advance in dark energy in the timeframe 2018-2022. On the Mayall telescope, DESI will obtain spectra and redshifts for at least 18 million emission-line galaxies, 4 million luminous red galaxies and 3 million quasi-stellar objects, in order to: probe the effects of dark energy on the expansion history using baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), measure the gravitational growth history through redshift-space distortions, measure the sum of neutrino masses, and investigate the signatures of primordial inflation. The resulting 3-D galaxy maps at z<2 and Lyman-alpha forest at z>2 will make 1%-level measurements of the distance scale in 35 redshift bins, thus providing unprecedented constraints on cosmological models.
  • We present the COmoving Lagrangian Acceleration (COLA) method: an N-body method for solving for Large Scale Structure (LSS) in a frame that is comoving with observers following trajectories calculated in Lagrangian Perturbation Theory (LPT). Unlike standard N-body methods, the COLA method can straightforwardly trade accuracy at small-scales in order to gain computational speed without sacrificing accuracy at large scales. This is especially useful for cheaply generating large ensembles of accurate mock halo catalogs required to study galaxy clustering and weak lensing, as those catalogs are essential for performing detailed error analysis for ongoing and future surveys of LSS. As an illustration, we ran a COLA-based N-body code on a box of size 100Mpc/h with particles of mass ~5*10^9Msolar/h. Running the code with only 10 timesteps was sufficient to obtain an accurate description of halo statistics down to halo masses of at least 10^11Msolar/h. This is only at a modest speed penalty when compared to mocks obtained with LPT. A standard detailed N-body run is orders of magnitude slower than our COLA-based code. The speed-up we obtain with COLA is due to the fact that we calculate the large-scale dynamics exactly using LPT, while letting the N-body code solve for the small scales, without requiring it to capture exactly the internal dynamics of halos. Achieving a similar level of accuracy in halo statistics without the COLA method requires at least 3 times more timesteps than when COLA is employed.
  • We measure the acoustic scale from the angular power spectra of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) Data Release 8 imaging catalog that includes 872,921 galaxies over ~ 10,000 deg^2 between 0.45<z<0.65. The extensive spectroscopic training set of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) luminous galaxies allows precise estimates of the true redshift distributions of galaxies in our imaging catalog. Utilizing the redshift distribution information, we build templates and fit to the power spectra of the data, which are measured in our companion paper, Ho et al. 2011, to derive the location of Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) while marginalizing over many free parameters to exclude nearly all of the non-BAO signal. We derive the ratio of the angular diameter distance to the sound horizon scale D_A/r_s= 9.212 + 0.416 -0.404 at z=0.54, and therefore, D_A= 1411+- 65 Mpc at z=0.54; the result is fairly independent of assumptions on the underlying cosmology. Our measurement of angular diameter distance D_A is 1.4 \sigma higher than what is expected for the concordance LCDM (Komatsu et al. 2011), in accordance to the trend of other spectroscopic BAO measurements for z >~ 0.35. We report constraints on cosmological parameters from our measurement in combination with the WMAP7 data and the previous spectroscopic BAO measurements of SDSS (Percival et al. 2010) and WiggleZ (Blake et al. 2011). We refer to our companion papers (Ho et al. 2011; de Putter et al. 2011) for investigations on information of the full power spectrum.
  • Using a sample of approximately 14,000 z>2.1 quasars observed in the first year of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), we measure the three-dimensional correlation function of absorption in the Lyman-alpha forest. The angle-averaged correlation function of transmitted flux (F = exp(-tau)) is securely detected out to comoving separations of 60 Mpc/h, the first detection of flux correlations across widely separated sightlines. A quadrupole distortion of the redshift-space correlation function by peculiar velocities, the signature of the gravitational instability origin of structure in the Lyman-alpha forest, is also detected at high significance. We obtain a good fit to the data assuming linear theory redshift-space distortion and linear bias of the transmitted flux, relative to the matter fluctuations of a standard LCDM cosmological model (inflationary cold dark matter with a cosmological constant). At 95% confidence, we find a linear bias parameter 0.16<b<0.24 and redshift-distortion parameter 0.44<beta<1.20, at central redshift z=2.25, with a well constrained combination b(1+\beta)=0.336 +/- 0.012. The errors on beta are asymmetric, with beta=0 excluded at over 5 sigma confidence level. The value of beta is somewhat low compared to theoretical predictions, and our tests on synthetic data suggest that it is depressed (relative to expectations for the Lyman-alpha forest alone) by the presence of high column density systems and metal line absorption. These results set the stage for cosmological parameter determinations from three-dimensional structure in the Lyman-alpha forest, including anticipated constraints on dark energy from baryon acoustic oscillations.
  • We present the first measurement of the spatial clustering of mid-infrared selected obscured and unobscured quasars, using a sample in the redshift range 0.7 < z < 1.8 selected from the 9 deg^2 Bootes multiwavelength survey. Recently the Spitzer Space Telescope and X-ray observations have revealed large populations of obscured quasars that have been inferred from models of the X-ray background and supermassive black hole evolution. To date, little is known about obscured quasar clustering, which allows us to measure the masses of their host dark matter halos and explore their role in the cosmic evolution of black holes and galaxies. In this study we use a sample of 806 mid-infrared selected quasars and ~250,000 galaxies to calculate the projected quasar-galaxy cross-correlation function w_p(R). The observed clustering yields characteristic dark matter halo masses of log (M_halo [h^-1 M_sun]) = 12.7^+0.4_-0.6 and 13.3^+0.3_-0.4 for unobscured quasars (QSO-1s) and obscured quasars (Obs-QSOs), respectively. The results for QSO-1s are in excellent agreement with previous measurements for optically-selected quasars, while we conclude that the Obs-QSOs are at least as strongly clustered as the QSO-1s. We test for the effects of photometric redshift errors on the optically-faint Obs-QSOs, and find that our method yields a robust lower limit on the clustering; photo-z errors may cause us to underestimate the clustering amplitude of the Obs-QSOs by at most ~20%. We compare our results to previous studies, and speculate on physical implications of stronger clustering for obscured quasars.
  • We present the fifth edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog, which is based upon the SDSS Seventh Data Release. The catalog, which contains 105,783 spectroscopically confirmed quasars, represents the conclusion of the SDSS-I and SDSS-II quasar survey. The catalog consists of the SDSS objects that have luminosities larger than M_i = -22.0 (in a cosmology with H_0 = 70 km/s/Mpc Omega_M = 0.3, and Omega_Lambda = 0.7) have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km/s or have interesting/complex absorption features, are fainter than i > 15.0 and have highly reliable redshifts. The catalog covers an area of 9380 deg^2. The quasar redshifts range from 0.065 to 5.46, with a median value of 1.49; the catalog includes 1248 quasars at redshifts greater than four, of which 56 are at redshifts greater than five. The catalog contains 9210 quasars with i < 18; slightly over half of the entries have i< 19. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.1" rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra cover the wavelength region 3800-9200 Ang. at a spectral resolution R = 2000 the spectra can be retrieved from the SDSS public database using the information provided in the catalog. Over 96% of the objects in the catalog were discovered by the SDSS. We also include a supplemental list of an additional 207 quasars with SDSS spectra whose archive photometric information is incomplete.
  • In an effort to resolve the discrepancy between two measurements of the fundamental constant mu, the proton to electron mass ratio, at early times in the universe we reanalyze the same data used in the earlier studies. Our analysis of the molecular hydrogen absorption lines in archival VLT/UVES spectra of the damped Lyman alpha systems in the QSOs Q0347-383 and Q0405-443 yields a combined measurement of a (Delta mu)/mu value of (-7 +/- 8) x 10^{-6}, consistent with no change in the value of mu over a time span of 11.5 gigayears. Here we define (Delta mu) as (mu_z - mu_0) where mu_z is the value of mu at a redshift of z and mu_0 is the present day value. Our null result is consistent with the recent measurements of King et al. 2009, (Delta mu)/u = (2.6 +/- 3.0) x 10^{-6}, and inconsistent with the positive detection of a change in mu by Reinhold et al. 2006. Both of the previous studies and this study are based on the same data but with differing analysis methods. Improvements in the wavelength calibration over the UVES pipeline calibration is a key element in both of the null results. This leads to the conclusion that the fundamental constant mu is unchanged to an accuracy of 10^{-5} over the last 80% of the age of the universe, well into the matter dominated epoch. This limit provides constraints on models of dark energy that invoke rolling scalar fields and also limits the parameter space of Super Symmetric or string theory models of physics. New instruments, both planned and under construction, will provide opportunities to greatly improve the accuracy of these measurements.
  • We explore the connection between different classes of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and the evolution of their host galaxies, by deriving host galaxy properties, clustering, and Eddington ratios of AGNs selected in the radio, X-ray, and infrared. We study a sample of 585 AGNs at 0.25 < z < 0.8 using redshifts from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES) and data in the radio (WSRT 1.4 GHz), X-rays (Chandra XBootes), and mid-IR (IRAC Shallow Survey). The radio, X-ray, and IR AGN samples show modest overlap, indicating that to the flux limits of the survey, they represent largely distinct classes of AGNs. We derive host galaxy colors and luminosities, as well as Eddington ratios (lambda), for obscured or optically faint AGNs. We also measure the two-point cross-correlation between AGNs and galaxies on scales of 0.3-10 h^-1 Mpc, and derive typical dark matter halo masses. We find that: (1) radio AGNs are mainly found in luminous red galaxies, are strongly clustered (with M_halo ~ 3x10^13 h^-1 M_sun), and have very low lambda <~ 10^-3; (2) X-ray-selected AGNs are preferentially found in galaxies in the "green valley" of color-magnitude space and are clustered similarly to typical AGES galaxies (M_halo ~ 10^13 h^-1 M_sun), with 10^-3 <~ lambda <~ 1; (3) IR AGNs reside in slightly bluer, less luminous galaxies than X-ray AGNs, are weakly clustered (M_halo <~ 10^12 h^-1 M_sun), and have lambda > 10^-2. We interpret these results in terms of a simple model of AGN and galaxy evolution, whereby a "quasar" phase and the growth of the stellar bulge occurs when a galaxy's dark matter halo reaches a critical mass between ~10^12 and 10^13 M_sun. Subsequently, star formation ceases and AGN accretion shifts from radiatively efficient (optical- and IR- bright) to radiatively inefficient (optically-faint, radio-bright) modes.
  • Over the last decade optical spectroscopic surveys have characterized the low redshift galaxy population and uncovered populations of star-forming galaxies back to z ~ 7. This work has shown that the primary epoch of galaxy building and black hole growth occurs at redshifts of 2 to 3. The establishment of the concordance LCDM cosmology shifted the focus of galaxy population studies from constraining cosmological parameters to characterizing the processes which regulate the formation and evolution of galaxies.In the next decade, high redshift observers will attempt to formulate a coherent evolutionary picture connecting galaxies in the high redshift Universe to galaxies today. In order to link galaxy populations at different redshifts, we must not only characterize their evolution in a systematic way, we must establish which physical processes are responsible for it. Considerable progress has already been made in understanding how galaxies evolved from z ~ 1 to the present day. Large spectroscopic surveys in the near infrared are required to push these studies back towards the main epoch of galaxy building. Only then will we understand the full story of the formation of L* galaxies like our own Milky Way. A large near-IR spectroscopic survey will also provide the calibration needed to avoid systematics in the large photometric programs proposed to study the nature of dark matter and dark energy. We provide an outline design for a multi-object 0.4 to 1.8 micron spectrograph, which could be placed on an existing telescope, and which would allow a full characterization of the galaxy population out to z ~ 2. We strongly recommend a serious further study to design a real instrument, which will be required for galaxy formation studies to advance to the next frontier.
  • These are the findings of the Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM) Figure of Merit (FoM) Science Working Group (SWG), the FoMSWG. JDEM is a space mission planned by NASA and the DOE for launch in the 2016 time frame. The primary mission is to explore the nature of dark energy. In planning such a mission, it is necessary to have some idea of knowledge of dark energy in 2016, and a way to quantify the performance of the mission. In this paper we discuss these issues.
  • To obtain an unbiased sample of bright LyA blobs [L(LyA) > 10^43 ergs/s], we have undertaken a blind, wide-field, narrow-band imaging survey in the NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey Bootes field with the Steward Bok-2.3m telescope. After searching over 4.82 sq. degrees at z=2.3, we discover four LyA blobs with L(LyA) = 1.6-5.3 x 10^43 ergs/s, isophotal areas of 28-57 sq. arcsec, and broad LyA line profiles (FWHM = 900-1250 km/s). In contrast with the extended Lyman alpha halos associated with high-z radio galaxies, none of our four blobs are radio-loud. The X-ray luminosities and optical spectra of these blobs are diverse. Two blobs (3 and 4) are X-ray-detected with L_X(2-7 keV) = 2-4 x 10^44 ergs/s and have broad optical emission lines (C IV) characteristic of AGN, implying that 50% of our sample blobs are associated with strong AGN. The other 50% of blobs (1 and 2) are not X-ray or optically-detected as AGN down to similar limits. The number density of the four blobs is ~3 x 10^{-6} Mpc^{-3}, comparable to that of galaxy clusters at similar redshifts and 3x lower than that found in the SSA22 proto-cluster at z=3.1, even after accounting for the over-density of that region. The two X-ray undetected blobs are separated by only 70" (550 kpc) and have almost identical redshifts (< 360 kpc along the line-of-sight), suggesting that they are part of the same system. Given the rarity of the blobs and our discovery of a close pair, we speculate that blobs occupy the highest density regions and thus may be precursors of today's rich cluster galaxies.
  • This paper addresses the nature of the near infrared background. We investigate whether there is an excess background at 1.4 microns, what is the source of the near infrared background and whether that background after the subtraction of all known sources contains the signature of high redshift objects (Z > 10). Based on NICMOS observations in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field and the Northern Hubble Deep Field we find that there is no excess in the background at 1.4 microns and that the claimed excess is due to inaccurate models of the zodiacal background. We find that the near infrared background is now spatially resolved and is dominated by galaxies in the redshift range between 0.5 and 1.5. We find no signature than can be attributed to high redshift sources after subtraction of all known sources either in the residual background or in the fluctuations of the residual background. We show that the color of the fluctuations from both NICMOS and Spitzer observations are consistent with low redshift objects and inconsistent with objects at redshifts greater than 10. It is most likely that the residual fluctuation power after source subtraction is due to the outer regions of low redshift galaxies that are below the source detection limit and therefore not removed during the source subtraction.
  • We present cosmological results from the statistics of lensed quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Lens Search. By taking proper account of the selection function, we compute the expected number of quasars lensed by early-type galaxies and their image separation distribution assuming a flat universe, which is then compared with 7 lenses found in the SDSS Data Release 3 to derive constraints on dark energy under strictly controlled criteria. For a cosmological constant model (w=-1) we obtain \Omega_\Lambda=0.74^{+0.11}_{-0.15}(stat.)^{+0.13}_{-0.06}(syst.). Allowing w to be a free parameter we find \Omega_M=0.26^{+0.07}_{-0.06}(stat.)^{+0.03}_{-0.05}(syst.) and w=-1.1\pm0.6(stat.)^{+0.3}_{-0.5}(syst.) when combined with the constraint from the measurement of baryon acoustic oscillations in the SDSS luminous red galaxy sample. Our results are in good agreement with earlier lensing constraints obtained using radio lenses, and provide additional confirmation of the presence of dark energy consistent with a cosmological constant, derived independently of type Ia supernovae.
  • We report the first results of our systematic search for strongly lensed quasars using the spectroscopically confirmed quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Among 46,420 quasars from the SDSS Data Release 3 (~4188 deg^2), we select a subsample of 22,683 quasars that are located at redshifts between 0.6 and 2.2 and are brighter than the Galactic extinction corrected i-band magnitude of 19.1. We identify 220 lens candidates from the quasar subsample, for which we conduct extensive and systematic follow-up observations in optical and near-infrared wavebands, in order to construct a complete lensed quasar sample at image separations between 1'' and 20'' and flux ratios of faint to bright lensed images larger than 10^{-0.5}. We construct a statistical sample of 11 lensed quasars. Ten of these are galaxy-scale lenses with small image separations (~1''-2'') and one is a large separation (15'') system which is produced by a massive cluster of galaxies, representing the first statistical sample of lensed quasars including both galaxy- and cluster-scale lenses. The Data Release 3 spectroscopic quasars contain an additional 11 lensed quasars outside the statistical sample.
  • We have combined optical data from the 2dF-SDSS Luminous Red Galaxy and QSO (2SLAQ) redshift survey with radio measurements from the 1.4 GHz VLA FIRST and NVSS surveys to identify a volume-limited sample of 391 radio galaxies at redshift 0.4<z<0.7. By determining an accurate radio luminosity function for early-type galaxies in this redshift range, we can investigate the cosmic evolution of the radio-galaxy population over a wide range in radio luminosity. The low-power radio galaxies in our LRG sample (those with 1.4 GHz radio luminosities in the range 10^{24} to 10^{25} W/Hz, corresponding to FR I radio galaxies in the local universe) undergo significant cosmic evolution over the redshift range 0<z<0.7, consistent with pure luminosity evolution of the form (1+z)^k where k=2.0+/-0.3. Our results appear to rule out (at the 6-7 sigma level) models in which low-power radio galaxies undergo no cosmic evolution. The most powerful radio galaxies in our sample (with radio luminosities above 10^{26} W/Hz) may undergo more rapid evolution over the same redshift range. The evolution seen in the low-power radio-galaxy population implies that the total energy input into massive early-type galaxies from AGN heating increases with redshift, and was roughly 50% higher at z~0.55 (the median redshift of the 2SLAQ LRG sample) than in the local universe.
  • This letter extends our previous fluctuation analysis of the near infrared background at 1.6 microns to the 1.1 micron (F110W) image of the Hubble Ultra Deep field. When all detectable sources are removed the ratio of fluctuation power in the two images is consistent with the ratio expected for faint, z<8, sources, and is inconsistent with the expected ratio for galaxies with z>8. We also use numerically redshifted model galaxy spectral energy distributions for 50 and 10 million year old galaxies to predict the expected fluctuation power at 3.6 microns and 4.5 microns to compare with recent Spitzer observations. The predicted fluctuation power for galaxies at z = 0-12 matches the observed Spitzer fluctuation power while the predicted power for z>13 galaxies is much higher than the observed values. As was found in the 1.6 micron (F160W) analysis the fluctuation power in the source subtracted F110W image is two orders of magnitude below the power in the image with all sources present. This leads to the conclusion that the 0.8--1.8 micron near infrared background is due to resolved galaxies in the redshift range z<8, with the majority of power in the redshift range of 0.5--1.5.
  • We have discovered 21 new Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and have used them to trace the history of cosmic expansion over the last 10 billion years. These objects, which include 13 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia at z > 1, were discovered during 14 epochs of reimaging of the GOODS fields North and South over two years with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on HST. Together with a recalibration of our previous HST-discovered SNe Ia, the full sample of 23 SNe Ia at z > 1 provides the highest-redshift sample known. Combined with previous SN Ia datasets, we measured H(z) at discrete, uncorrelated epochs, reducing the uncertainty of H(z>1) from 50% to under 20%, strengthening the evidence for a cosmic jerk--the transition from deceleration in the past to acceleration in the present. The unique leverage of the HST high-redshift SNe Ia provides the first meaningful constraint on the dark energy equation-of-state parameter at z >1. The result remains consistent with a cosmological constant (w(z)=-1), and rules out rapidly evolving dark energy (dw/dz >>1). The defining property of dark energy, its negative pressure, appears to be present at z>1, in the epoch preceding acceleration, with ~98% confidence in our primary fit. Moreover, the z>1 sample-averaged spectral energy distribution is consistent with that of the typical SN Ia over the last 10 Gyr, indicating that any spectral evolution of the properties of SNe Ia with redshift is still below our detection threshold.
  • NICMOS observations of the resolved object fluxes in the Hubble Deep Field North and the Hubble Ultra Deep Field are significantly below the fluxes attributed to a 1.4 - 1.8 microns Near InfraRed Background Excess (NIRBE) from previous low spatial resolution NIRS measurements. Tests placing sources in the NICMOS image with fluxes sufficient to account for the NIRBE indicate that the NIRBE flux must be either flat on scales greater than 100 arc second or clumped on scales of several arc minutes to avoid detection in the NICMOS image. A fluctuation analysis of the new NICMOS data shows a fluctuation spectrum consistent with that found at the same wavelength in deep 2MASS calibration images. The fluctuation analysis shows that the majority of the fluctuation power comes from resolved galaxies at redshifts of 1.5 and less and that the fluctuations observed in the earlier deep 2MASS observations can be completely accounted for with normal low redshift galaxies. Neither the NICMOS direct flux measurements nor the fluctuation analysis require an additional component of near infrared flux other than the flux from normal resolved galaxies in the redshift range between 0 and 7. The residual fluctuations in the angular range between 1 and 10 arc seconds is 1-2 nW m-2 sr-1 which is at or above several predictions of fluctuations from high redshift population III objects, but inconsistent with attributing the entire NIRBE to high redshift galaxies.