• Ongoing and future spectroscopic surveys will measure numerous galaxy redshifts within tens of thousands of galaxy clusters. However, the sampling within these clusters will be low, 15 < N < 50 per cluster. With such data, it will be difficult to achieve accurate and precise mass estimates for individual clusters using phase-space mass estimation techniques. We develop and test a new stacking algorithm based on the caustic technique, which reduces the mass scatter in <log M_caustic | M_200 > for ensemble clusters from 70% for individual clusters to less than 10% for ensemble clusters with only 15 galaxies per cluster and 100 clusters per ensemble. With > 1000 galaxies per ensemble phase-space, the escape-velocity edge becomes readily identifiable and the presence of interloping galaxies is minimized. We develop and test an algorithm to trace the projected phase-space surface directly, which results in minimally biased dynamical mass estimates. We then quantify how binning and sampling affect the phase-space-based mass estimates when using an observational proxy that incorporates realistic mass scatter, like richness, and find the added uncertainty in the binning procedure has minimal influence on the resulting bias and scatter of the stacked mass estimates.
  • We use N-body simulations to quantify how the escape velocity in cluster-sized halos maps to the gravitational potential in a LambdaCDM universe. Using spherical density-potential pairs and the Poisson equation, we find that the matter density inferred gravitational potential profile predicts the escape velocity profile to within a few percent accuracy for group and cluster-sized halos (10^13 < M_200 < 10^15 M_sun, with respect to the critical density). The accuracy holds from just outside the core to beyond the virial radius. We show the importance of explicitly incorporating a cosmological constant when inferring the potential from the Poisson equation. We consider three density models and find that the Einasto and Gamma profiles provide a better joint estimate of the density and potential profiles than the Navarro, Frenk and White profile, which fails to accurately represent the escape velocity. For individual halos, the 1 sigma scatter between the measured escape velocity and the density-inferred potential profile is small (<5%). Finally, while the sub-halos show 15% biases in their representation of the particle velocity dispersion profile, the sub-halo escape velocity profile matches the dark matter escape velocity profile to high accuracy with no evidence for velocity bias outside 0.4r_200.
  • We derive the escape velocity profile for an Einasto density field in an accelerating universe and demonstrate its physical viability by comparing theoretical expectations to both light-cone data generated from N-body simulations and archival data on 20 galaxy clusters. We demonstrate that the projection function ($g(\beta )$) is deemed physically viable only for the theoretical expectation that includes a cosmology-dependent term. Using simulations, we show that the inferred velocity anisotropy is more than 6{\sigma} away from the expected value for the theoretical profile that ignores the acceleration of the universe. In the archival data, we constrain the average velocity anisotropy parameter of a sample of 20 clusters to be $\beta ={0.248}_{-0.360}^{+0.164}$ at the 68% confidence level. Lastly, we briefly discuss how our analytic model may be used as a novel cosmological probe based on galaxy clusters.
  • We measure the evolution of the velocity dispersion--temperature ($\sigma_{\rm v}$--$T_{\rm X}$) relation up to $z = 1$ using a sample of 38 galaxy clusters drawn from the \textit{XMM} Cluster Survey. This work improves upon previous studies by the use of a homogeneous cluster sample and in terms of the number of high redshift clusters included. We present here new redshift and velocity dispersion measurements for 12 $z > 0.5$ clusters observed with the GMOS instruments on the Gemini telescopes. Using an orthogonal regression method, we find that the slope of the relation is steeper than that expected if clusters were self-similar, and that the evolution of the normalisation is slightly negative, but not significantly different from zero ($\sigma_{\rm v} \propto T^{0.86 \pm 0.14} E(z)^{-0.37 \pm 0.33}$). We verify our results by applying our methods to cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. The lack of evolution seen in our data is consistent with simulations that include both feedback and radiative cooling.
  • Modified theories of gravity provide us with a unique opportunity to generate innovative tests of gravity. In Chameleon f(R) gravity, the gravitational potential differs from the weak-field limit of general relativity (GR) in a mass dependent way. We develop a probe of gravity which compares high mass clusters, where Chameleon effects are weak, to low mass clusters, where the effects can be strong. We utilize the escape velocity edges in the radius/velocity phase space to infer the gravitational potential profiles on scales of 0.3-1 virial radii. We show that the escape edges of low mass clusters are enhanced compared to GR, where the magnitude of the difference depends on the background field value |fR0|. We validate our probe using N-body simulations and simulated light cone galaxy data. For a DESI (Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument) Bright Galaxy Sample, including observational systematics, projection effects, and cosmic variance, our test can differentiate between GR and Chameleon f(R) gravity models, |fR0| = 4e-6 (2e-6) at > 5{\sigma} (> 2{\sigma}), more than an order of magnitude better than current cluster-scale constraints.
  • We quantify the expected observed statistical and systematic uncertainties of the escape velocity as a measure of the gravitational potential and total mass of galaxy clusters. We focus our attention on low redshift (z < 0.15) clusters, where large and deep spectroscopic datasets currently exist. Utilizing a suite of Millennium Simulation semi-analytic galaxy catalogs, we find that the dynamical mass, as traced by either the virial relation or the escape velocity, is robust to variations in how dynamical friction is applied to "orphan" galaxies in the mock catalogs (i.e., those galaxies whose dark matter halos have fallen below the resolution limit). We find that the caustic technique recovers the known halo masses (M_200) with a third less scatter compared to the virial masses. The bias we measure increases quickly as the number of galaxies used decreases. For N_gal > 25, the scatter in the escape velocity mass is dominated by projections along the line-of-sight. Algorithmic uncertainties from the determination of the projected escape velocity profile are negligible. We quantify how target selection based on magnitude, color, and projected radial separation can induce small additional biases into the escape velocity masses. Using N_gal = 150 (25), the caustic technique has a per cluster scatter in ln(M|M_200) of 0.3 (0.5) and bias 1+/-3% (16+/-5%) for clusters with masses > 10^14M_solar at z<0.15.
  • We use the Millennium Simulation to quantify the statistical accuracy and precision of the escape velocity technique for measuring cluster-sized halo masses at z~0.1. We show that in 3D, one can measure nearly unbiased (<4%) halo masses (>1.5x10^14 M_solar h^-1) with 10-15% scatter. Line-of-sight projection effects increase the scatter to ~25%, where we include the known velocity anisotropies. The classical "caustic" technique incorporates a calibration factor which is determined from N-body simulations. We derive and test a new implementation which eliminates the need for calibration and utilizes only the observables: the galaxy velocities with respect to the cluster mean v, the projected positions r_p, an estimate of the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) density concentration and an estimate of the velocity anisotropies, beta. We find that differences between the potential and density NFW concentrations induce a 10% bias in the caustic masses. We also find that large (100%) systematic errors in the observed ensemble average velocity anisotropies and concentrations translate to small (5%-10%) biases in the inferred masses.