• The classic single-degenerate model for the progenitors of Type Ia Supernova (SN Ia) predicts that the supernova ejecta should be enriched with solar-like abundance material stripped from the companion star. Spectroscopic observations of normal SNe Ia at late times, however, have not resulted in definite detection of hydrogen. In this Letter, we study line formation in SNe Ia at nebular times using non-LTE spectral modeling. We present, for the first time, multidimensional radiative transfer calculations of SNe Ia with stripped material mixed in the ejecta core, based on hydrodynamical simulations of ejecta-companion interaction. We find that interaction models with main sequence companions produce significant H$\alpha$ emission at late times, ruling out this type of binaries being viable progenitors of SNe Ia. We also predict significant He I line emission at optical and near-infrared wavelengths for both hydrogen-rich or helium-rich material, providing an additional observational probe of stripped ejecta. We produce models with reduced stripped masses and find a more stringent mass limit of $M_{st} \lesssim 1\times 10^{-4} M_\odot$ of stripped companion material for SN 2011fe.
  • We investigate line formation in gas that is outflowing and optically thick to electron scattering, as may be expected following the tidal disruption of a star by a super-massive black hole. Using radiative transfer calculations, we show that the optical line profiles produced by expanding TDE outflows are most likely primarily emission features, rather than the P-Cygni profiles seen in most supernova spectra. This is a result of the high line excitation temperatures in the highly irradiated TDE gas. The outflow kinematics cause the emission peak to be blueshifted and to have an asymmetric red wing. Such features have been observed in some TDE spectra, and we propose that these may be signatures of outflows. We also show that non-coherent scattering off of hot electrons can broaden the emission lines by $\sim 10000$~km~s$^{-1}$, such that in some TDEs the line width may be set by the electron scattering optical depth rather than the gas kinematics. The scattering broadened line profiles produce distinct, wing-shaped profiles that are similar to those observed in some TDE spectra. The narrowing of the emission lines over time in these observed events may be related to a drop in density rather than a drop in line-of-sight velocity.
  • Stars approaching supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in the centers of galaxies can be torn apart by strong tidal forces. We study the physics of tidal disruption by a binary SMBH as a function of the binary mass ratio $q = M_2 / M_1$ and separation $a$, exploring a large set of points in the parameter range $q \in [0.01, 1]$ and $a/r_{t1} \in [10, 1000]$. We simulate encounters in which field stars approach the binary from the loss cone on parabolic, low angular momentum orbits. We present the rate of disruption and the orbital properties of the disrupted stars, and examine the fallback dynamics of the post-disruption debris in the "frozen-in" approximation. We conclude by calculating the time-dependent disruption rate over the lifetime of the binary. Throughout, we use a primary mass $M_1 = 10^6 M_\odot$ as our central example. We find that the tidal disruption rate is a factor of $\sim 2 - 7$ times larger than the rate for an isolated BH, and is independent of $q$ for $q \gtrsim 0.2$. In the "frozen-in" model, disruptions from close, nearly equal mass binaries can produce intense tidal fallbacks: for binaries with $q \gtrsim 0.2$ and $a/r_{t1} \sim 100$, roughly $\sim 18 - 40 \%$ of disruptions will have short rise times ($t_\textrm{rise} \sim 1 - 10$ d) and highly super-Eddington peak return rates ($\dot{M}_\textrm{peak} / \dot{M}_\textrm{Edd} \sim 2 \times 10^2 - 3 \times 10^3$).
  • We analyze the outcome of the interaction between a stellar binary and a supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB) by performing a large number of gravitational scattering experiments. Most of the encounters result in either the ejection of an intact binary or the ejection of two individual stars following the tidal breakup of the binary. However, tidal disruption events (TDEs) and mergers constitute a few percent of the outcomes, and double, temporally distinct TDEs (i.e., separated by at least one orbit of the supermassive black hole binary) occur at the percent level. We also demonstrate that the properties of the ejected binaries are significantly altered through the interaction with the SMBHB, and their large eccentricities increase the merger rate and could lead to gravitational-wave inspirals far from the nucleus of the host galaxy. We discuss our results in the context of observed tidal disruption events, hypervelocity stars, and remote supernovae, such as calcium-rich transients.
  • Interaction between supernova (SN) ejecta and a dense circumstellar medium (CSM) can power a luminous light curve and create narrow emission lines in the spectra. While theoretical studies of interaction often assume a spherically symmetric CSM, there are observational indications that the gas surrounding some SN has a disk-like geometry. Here, we use moving-mesh hydrodynamics simulations to study the interaction of a SN with a disk and determine how the dynamics and observable signatures may depend on the disk mass, thickness, and radial extent. We find that simple modifications to standard spherically-symmetric scaling laws can be used to describe the propagation and heating rate of the interaction shock. We use the resulting shock heating rates to derive approximate bolometric light curves, and provide analytic formulas that can be used to generate simple synthetic light curves for general supernova-disk interactions. For certain disk parameters and explosion energies, we are able to produce luminosities akin to those seen in super-luminous SN. Because the SN ejecta can flow around and engulf the CSM disk, the interaction region may become embedded and from certain viewing angles the narrow emission lines indicative of interaction may be hidden.
  • The detonation of a sub-Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf (WD) has emerged as one of the most promising Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) progenitor scenarios. Recent studies have suggested that the rapid transfer of a very small amount of helium from one WD to another is sufficient to ignite a helium shell detonation that subsequently triggers a carbon core detonation, yielding a "dynamically-driven double degenerate double detonation" SN Ia. Because the helium shell that surrounds the core explosion is so minimal, this scenario approaches the limiting case of a bare C/O WD detonation. Motivated by discrepancies in previous literature and by a recent need for detailed nucleosynthetic data, we revisit simulations of naked C/O WD detonations in this paper. We disagree to some extent with the nucleosynthetic results of previous work on sub-Chandrasekhar-mass bare C/O WD detonations; e.g., we find that a median-brightness SN Ia is produced by the detonation of a 1.0 Msol WD instead of a more massive and rarer 1.1 Msol WD. The neutron-rich nucleosynthesis in our simulations agrees broadly with some observational constraints, although tensions remain with others. There are also discrepancies related to the velocities of the outer ejecta and light curve shapes, but overall our synthetic light curves and spectra are roughly consistent with observations. We are hopeful that future multi-dimensional simulations will resolve these issues and further bolster the dynamically-driven double degenerate double detonation scenario's potential to explain most SNe Ia.
  • The nature of an emerging class of rapidly fading supernovae (RFSNe)--characterized by their short-lived light curve duration, but varying widely in peak brightness--remains puzzling. Whether the RFSNe arise from low-mass thermonuclear eruptions on white dwarfs or from the core collapse of massive stars is still a matter of dispute. We explore the possibility that the explosion of hydrogen-free massive stars could produce bright but rapidly fading transients if the effective pre-supernova radii are large and if little or no radioactive nickel is ejected. The source of radiation is then purely due to shock cooling. We study this model of RFSNe using spherically symmetric hydrodynamics and radiation transport calculations of the explosion of stripped stars embedded in helium-dominated winds or shells of various masses and extent. We present a parameter study showing how the properties of the circumstellar envelopes affect the dynamics of the explosion and can lead to a diversity of light curves. We also explore the dynamics of the fallback of the innermost stellar layers, which might be able to remove radioactive nickel from the ejecta, making the rapid decline in the late time light curve possible. We provide scaling relations that describe how the duration and luminosity of these events depend on the supernova kinetic energy and the mass and radius of the circumstellar material.
  • There are two classes of viable progenitors for normal Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia): systems in which a white dwarf explodes at the Chandrasekhar mass ($M_{ch}$), and systems in which a white dwarf explodes below the Chandrasekhar mass (sub-$M_{ch}$). It is not clear which of these channels is dominant; observations and light curve modeling have provided evidence for both. Here we use an extensive grid of 4500 time-dependent, multiwavelength radiation transport simulations to show that the sub-$M_{ch}$ model can reproduce the entirety of the width-luminosity relation (WLR), while the $M_{ch}$ model can only produce the brighter events $(0.8 < \Delta M_{15}(B) < 1.55)$, implying that fast-declining SNe Ia come from sub-$M_{ch}$ explosions. We do not assume a particular theoretical paradigm for the progenitor or explosion mechanism, but instead construct parameterized models that vary the mass, kinetic energy, and compositional structure of the ejecta, thereby realizing a broad range of possible outcomes of white dwarf explosions. We provide fitting functions based on our large grid of detailed simulations that map observable properties of SNe Ia such as peak brightness and light curve width to physical parameters such as $^{56}\mathrm{Ni}$ and total ejected mass. These can be used to estimate the physical properties of observed SNe Ia.
  • 11 hours after the detection of gravitational wave source GW170817 by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory and Virgo Interferometers, an associated optical transient SSS17a was discovered in the galaxy NGC 4993. While the gravitational wave data indicate GW170817 is consistent with the merger of two compact objects, the electromagnetic observations provide independent constraints of the nature of that system. Here we synthesize all optical and near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy of SSS17a collected by the One-Meter Two-Hemisphere collaboration. We find that SSS17a is unlike other known transients. The source is best described by theoretical models of a kilonova consisting of radioactive elements produced by rapid neutron capture (the r-process). We find that SSS17a was the result of a binary neutron star merger, reinforcing the gravitational wave result.
  • The merging neutron star gravitational wave event GW170817 has been observed throughout the entire electromagnetic spectrum from radio waves to $\gamma$-rays. The resulting energetics, variability, and light curves are shown to be consistent with GW170817 originating from the merger of two neutron stars, in all likelihood followed by the prompt gravitational collapse of the massive remnant. The available $\gamma$-ray, X-ray and radio data provide a clear probe for the nature of the relativistic ejecta and the non-thermal processes occurring within, while the ultraviolet, optical and infrared emission are shown to probe material torn during the merger and subsequently heated by the decay of freshly synthesized $r$-process material. The simplest hypothesis that the non-thermal emission is due to a low-luminosity short $\gamma$-ray burst (sGRB) seems to agree with the present data. While low luminosity sGRBs might be common, we show here that the collective prompt and multi-wavelength observations are also consistent with a typical, powerful sGRB seen off-axis. Detailed follow-up observations are thus essential before we can place stringent constraints on the nature of the relativistic ejecta in GW170817.
  • We present the spectroscopic evolution of AT 2017gfo, the optical counterpart of the first binary neutron star (BNS) merger detected by LIGO and Virgo, GW170817. While models have long predicted that a BNS merger could produce a kilonova (KN), we have not been able to definitively test these models until now. From one day to four days after the merger, we took five spectra of AT 2017gfo before it faded away, which was possible because it was at a distance of only 39.5 Mpc in the galaxy NGC 4993. The spectra evolve from blue ($\sim6400$K) to red ($\sim3500$K) over the three days we observed. The spectra are relatively featureless --- some weak features exist in our latest spectrum, but they are likely due to the host galaxy. However, a simple blackbody is not sufficient to explain our data: another source of luminosity or opacity is necessary. Predictions from simulations of KNe qualitatively match the observed spectroscopic evolution after two days past the merger, but underpredict the blue flux in our earliest spectrum. From our best-fit models, we infer that AT 2017gfo had an ejecta mass of $0.03M_\odot$, high ejecta velocities of $0.3c$, and a low mass fraction $\sim10^{-4}$ of high-opacity lanthanides and actinides. One possible explanation for the early excess of blue flux is that the outer ejecta is lanthanide-poor, while the inner ejecta has a higher abundance of high-opacity material. With the discovery and follow-up of this unique transient, combining gravitational-wave and electromagnetic astronomy, we have arrived in the multi-messenger era.
  • The cosmic origin of the elements heavier than iron has long been uncertain. Theoretical modelling shows that the matter that is expelled in the violent merger of two neutron stars can assemble into heavy elements such as gold and platinum in a process known as rapid neutron capture (r-process) nucleosynthesis. The radioactive decay of isotopes of the heavy elements is predicted to power a distinctive thermal glow (a 'kilonova'). The discovery of an electromagnetic counterpart to the gravitational-wave source GW170817 represents the first opportunity to detect and scrutinize a sample of freshly synthesized r-process elements. Here we report models that predict the detailed electromagnetic emission of kilonovae and enable the mass, velocity and composition of ejecta to be derived from the observations. We compare the models to the optical and infrared radiation associated with GW170817 event to argue that the observed source is a kilonova. We infer the presence of two distinct components of ejecta, one composed primarily of light (atomic mass number less than 140) and one of heavy (atomic mass number greater than 140) r-process elements. Inferring the ejected mass and a merger rate from GW170817 implies that such mergers are a dominant mode of r-process production in the Universe.
  • We discovered Swope Supernova Survey 2017a (SSS17a) in the LIGO/Virgo Collaboration (LVC) localization volume of GW170817, the first detected binary neutron star (BNS) merger, only 10.9 hours after the trigger. No object was present at the location of SSS17a only a few days earlier, providing a qualitative spatial and temporal association with GW170817. Here we quantify this association, finding that SSS17a is almost certainly the counterpart of GW170817, with the chance of a coincidence being < 9 x 10^-6 (90% confidence). We arrive at this conclusion by comparing the optical properties of SSS17a to other known astrophysical transients, finding that SSS17a fades and cools faster than any other observed transient. For instance, SSS17a fades >5 mag in g within 7 days of our first data point while all other known transients of similar luminosity fade by <1 mag during the same time period. Its spectra are also unique, being mostly featureless, even as it cools. The rarity of "SSS17a-like" transients combined with the relatively small LVC localization volume and recent non-detection imply the extremely unlikely chance coincidence. We find that the volumetric rate of SSS17a-like transients is < 1.6 x 10^4 Gpc^-3 year^-1 and the Milky Way rate is <0.19 per century. A transient survey designed to discover similar events should be high cadence and observe in red filters. The LVC will likely detect substantially more BNS mergers than current optical surveys will independently discover SSS17a-like transients, however a 1-day cadence survey with LSST could discover an order of magnitude more events.
  • During the core collapse of massive stars, the formation of the protoneutron star is accompanied by the emission of a significant amount of mass-energy ($\sim 0.3 \, M_{\odot}$) in the form of neutrinos. This mass-energy loss generates an outward-propagating pressure wave that steepens into a shock near the stellar surface, potentially powering a weak transient associated with an otherwise-failed supernova. We analytically investigate this mass-loss-induced wave generation and propagation. Heuristic arguments provide an accurate estimate of the amount of energy contained in the outgoing sound pulse. We then develop a general formalism for analyzing the response of the star to centrally concentrated mass loss in linear perturbation theory. To build intuition, we apply this formalism to polytropic stellar models, finding qualitative and quantitative agreement with simulations and heuristic arguments. We also apply our results to realistic pre-collapse massive star progenitors (both giants and compact stars). Our analytic results for the sound pulse energy, excitation radius, and steepening in the stellar envelope are in good agreement with full time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations. We show that {prior} to the sound pulses arrival at the stellar photosphere, the photosphere has already reached velocities $\sim 20-100 \%$ of the local sound speed, thus likely modestly decreasing the stellar effective temperature prior to the star disappearing. Our results provide important constraints on the physical properties and observational appearance of failed supernovae.
  • We investigate the nucleosynthesis of heavy elements in the winds ejected by accretion disks formed in neutron star mergers. We compute the element formation in disk outflows from hypermassive neutron star (HMNS) remnants of variable lifetime, including the effect of angular momentum transport in the disk evolution. We employ long-term axisymmetric hydrodynamic disk simulations to model the ejecta, and compute r-process nucleosynthesis with tracer particles using a nuclear reaction network containing $\sim 8000$ species. We find that the previously known strong correlation between HMNS lifetime, ejected mass, and average electron fraction in the outflow is directly related to the amount of neutrino irradiation on the disk, which dominates mass ejection at early times in the form of a neutrino-driven wind. Production of lanthanides and actinides saturates at short HMNS lifetimes ($\lesssim 10$ ms), with additional ejecta contributing to a blue optical kilonova component for longer-lived HMNSs. We find good agreement between the abundances from the disk outflow alone and the solar r-process distribution only for short HMNS lifetimes ($\lesssim 10$ ms). For longer lifetimes, the rare-earth and third r-process peaks are significantly under-produced compared to the solar pattern, requiring additional contributions from the dynamical ejecta. The nucleosynthesis signature from a spinning black hole (BH) can only overlap with that from a HMNS of moderate lifetime ($\lesssim 60$ ms). Finally, we show that angular momentum transport not only contributes with a late-time outflow component, but that it also enhances the neutrino-driven component by moving material to shallower regions of the gravitational potential, in addition to providing additional heating.
  • We present very early, high-cadence photometric observations of the nearby Type Ia SN 2017cbv. The light curve is unique in that it has a blue bump during the first five days of observations in the U, B, and g bands, which is clearly resolved given our photometric cadence of 5.7 hr during that time span. We model the light curve as the combination of early shocking of the supernova ejecta against a nondegenerate companion star plus a standard SN Ia component. Our best-fit model suggests the presence of a subgiant star 56 solar radii from the exploding white dwarf, although this number is highly model-dependent. While this model matches the optical light curve well, it overpredicts the observed flux in the ultraviolet bands. This may indicate that the shock is not a blackbody, perhaps because of line blanketing in the UV. Alternatively, it could point to another physical explanation for the optical blue bump, such as interaction with circumstellar material or an unusual nickel distribution. Early optical spectra of SN 2017cbv show strong carbon absorption up through day -13 with respect to maximum light, suggesting that the progenitor system contains a significant amount of unburned material. These early results on SN 2017cbv illustrate the power of early discovery and intense follow-up of nearby supernovae to resolve standing questions about the progenitor systems and explosion mechanisms of SNe Ia.
  • Unusually high velocities (< ~0.1c) and correspondingly high kinetic energies have been observed in a subset of Type Ic supernovae (so-called "broad-lined Ic" supernovae; SNe Ic-BL), prompting a search for a central engine model capable of generating such energetic explosions. A clue to the explosion mechanism may lie in the fact that all supernovae that accompany long-duration gamma-ray bursts belong to the SN Ic-BL class. Using a combination of two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamics and radiation transport calculations, we demonstrate that the central engine responsible for long gamma-ray bursts can also trigger a SN Ic-BL. We find that a reasonable gamma-ray burst engine injected into a stripped Wolf-Rayet progenitor produces a relativistic jet with energy ~10^51 ergs, as well as a SN whose synthetic light curves and spectra are fully consistent with observed SNe Ic-BL during the photospheric phase. As a result of the jet's asymmetric energy injection, the SN spectra and light curves depend on viewing angle. The impact of viewing angle on the spectrum is particularly pronounced at early times, while the viewing angle dependence for the light curves (~10% variation in bolometric luminosity) persists throughout the photospheric phase.
  • We investigate the ejecta from black hole - neutron star mergers by modeling the formation and interaction of mass ejected in a tidal tail and a disk wind. The outflows are neutron-rich, giving rise to optical/infrared emission powered by the radioactive decay of $r$-process elements (a kilonova). Here we perform an end-to-end study of this phenomenon, where we start from the output of a fully-relativistic merger simulation, calculate the post-merger hydrodynamical evolution of the ejecta and disk winds including neutrino physics, determine the final nucleosynthetic yields using post-processing nuclear reaction network calculations, and compute the kilonova emission with a radiative transfer code. We study the effects of the tail-to-disk mass ratio by scaling the tail density. A larger initial tail mass results in fallback matter becoming mixed into the disk and ejected in the subsequent disk wind. Relative to the case of a disk without dynamical ejecta, the combined outflow has lower mean electron fraction, faster speed, larger total mass, and larger absolute mass free of high-opacity Lanthanides or Actinides. In most cases, the nucleosynthetic yield is dominated by the heavy $r$-process contribution from the unbound part of the tidal tail. A Solar-like abundance distribution can however be obtained when the total mass of the dynamical ejecta is comparable to the mass of the disk outflows. The kilonova has a characteristic duration of 1 week and a luminosity of ~$10^{41}$ erg/s, with orientation effects leading to variations of a factor ~2 in brightness. At early times (< 1 day) the emission includes an optical component from the (hot) Lanthanide-rich material, but the spectrum evolves quickly to the infrared thereafter.
  • In this paper, we model the observable signatures of tidal disruptions of white dwarf (WD) stars by massive black holes (MBHs) of moderate mass, $\approx 10^3 - 10^5 M_\odot$. When the WD passes deep enough within the MBH's tidal field, these signatures include thermonuclear transients from burning during maximum compression. We combine a hydrodynamic simulation that includes nuclear burning of the disruption of a $0.6 M_\odot$ C/O WD with a Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculation to synthesize the properties of a representative transient. The transient's emission emerges in the optical, with lightcurves and spectra reminiscent of type I SNe. The properties are strongly viewing-angle dependent, and key spectral signatures are $\approx 10,000$ km s$^{-1}$ Doppler shifts due to the orbital motion of the unbound ejecta. Disruptions of He WDs likely produce large quantities of intermediate-mass elements, offering a possible production mechanism for Ca-rich transients. Accompanying multiwavelength transients are fueled by accretion and arise from the nascent accretion disk and relativistic jet. If MBHs of moderate mass exist with number densities similar to those of supermassive MBHs, both high energy wide-field monitors and upcoming optical surveys should detect tens to hundreds of WD tidal disruptions per year. The current best strategy for their detection may therefore be deep optical follow up of high-energy transients of unusually-long duration. The detection rate or the non-detection of these transients by current and upcoming surveys can thus be used to place meaningful constraints on the extrapolation of the MBH mass function to moderate masses.
  • The optical transient PTF11kx exhibited both the characteristic spectral features of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and the signature of ejecta interacting with circumstellar material (CSM) containing hydrogen, indicating the presence of a nondegenerate companion. We present an optical spectrum at $1342$ days after peak from Keck Observatory, in which the broad component of H$\alpha$ emission persists with a similar profile as in early-time observations. We also present $Spitzer$ IRAC detections obtained $1237$ and $1818$ days after peak, and an upper limit from $HST$ ultraviolet imaging at $2133$ days. We interpret our late-time observations in context with published results - and reinterpret the early-time observations - in order to constrain the CSM's physical parameters and compare to theoretical predictions for recurrent nova systems. We find that the CSM's radial extent may be several times the distance between the star and the CSM's inner edge, and that the CSM column density may be two orders of magnitude lower than previous estimates. We show that the H$\alpha$ luminosity decline is similar to other SNe with CSM interaction, and demonstrate how our infrared photometry is evidence for newly formed, collisionally heated dust. We create a model for PTF11kx's late-time CSM interaction and find that X-ray reprocessing by photoionization and recombination cannot reproduce the observed H$\alpha$ luminosity, suggesting that the X-rays are thermalized and that H$\alpha$ radiates from collisional excitation. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results regarding the progenitor scenario and the geometric properties of the CSM for the PTF11kx system.
  • We present a radiative transfer code to model the nebular phase spectra of supernovae (SNe) in non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE). We apply it to a systematic study of Type Ia SNe using parameterized 1D models and show how nebular spectral features depend on key physical parameters, such as the time since explosion, total ejecta mass, kinetic energy, radial density profile, and the masses of 56Ni, intermediate mass elements (IMEs), and stable iron-group elements (IGEs). We also quantify the impact of uncertainties in atomic data inputs. Among the results of the study are: (1) The main features of SNe Ia nebular spectra are relatively insensitive to most physical parameters. Degeneracy among parameters precludes a unique determination of the ejecta properties from spectral fitting. In particular, features can be equally well fit with generic Chandrasekhar mass (M_ch), sub-M_Ch, and super-M_Ch models; (2) A sizable (~0.1 Msun) central region of stable IGEs, often claimed as evidence for M_Ch models, is not essential to fit the optical spectra and may produce an unusual flat-top [CoIII] profile; (3) The strength of [SIII] emission near 9500A can provide a useful diagnostic of explosion nucleosynthesis; (4) Substantial amounts (~0.1 Msun) of unburned C/O mixed throughout the ejecta produce [OIII] emission not seen in observations; (5) Shifts in the wavelength of line peaks, sometimes used to infer ejecta geometry, can also arise from line blending effects; (6) The steepness of the ejecta density profile affects the line shapes, with flatter slopes providing better fits to the observations of SN 2011fe, offering a constraint on explosion models; (7) Uncertainties in atomic data affect spectral line ratios by ~30%, a level similar to the effect of varying physical parameters.
  • Neutron star-black hole binaries are among the strongest sources of gravitational waves detectable by current observatories. They can also power bright electromagnetic signals (gamma-ray bursts, kilonovae), and may be a significant source of production of r-process nuclei. A misalignment of the black hole spin with respect to the orbital angular momentum leads to precession of that spin and of the orbital plane, and has a significant effect on the properties of the post-merger remnant and of the material ejected by the merger. We present a first set of simulations of precessing neutron star-black hole mergers using a hot, composition dependent, nuclear-theory based equation of state (DD2). We show that the mass of the remnant and of the dynamical ejecta are broadly consistent with the result of simulations using simpler equations of state, while differences arise when considering the dynamics of the merger and the velocity of the ejecta. We show that the latter can easily be understood from assumptions about the composition of low-density, cold material in the different equations of state, and propose an updated estimate for the ejecta velocity which takes those effects into account. We also present an updated mesh-refinement algorithm which allows us to improve the numerical resolution used to evolve neutron star-black hole mergers.
  • We present stellar evolution calculations of the remnant of the merger of two carbon-oxygen white dwarfs (CO WDs). We focus on cases that have a total mass in excess of the Chandrasekhar mass. After the merger, the remnant manifests as an $L \sim 3 \times 10^4 L_\odot$ source for $\sim 10^4$ yr. A dusty wind may develop, leading these sources to be self-obscured and to appear similar to extreme AGB stars. Roughly $\sim 10$ such objects should exist in the Milky Way and M31 at any time. As found in previous work, off-center carbon fusion is ignited within the merger remnant and propagates inward via a carbon flame, converting the WD to an oxygen-neon (ONe) composition. By following the evolution for longer than previous calculations, we demonstrate that after carbon-burning reaches the center, neutrino-cooled Kelvin-Helmholtz contraction leads to off-center neon ignition in remnants with masses $\ge 1.35 M_\odot$. The resulting neon-oxygen flame converts the core to a silicon WD. Thus, super-Chandrasekhar WD merger remnants do not undergo electron-capture induced collapse as traditionally assumed. Instead, if the remnant mass remains above the Chandrasekhar mass, we expect that it will form a low-mass iron core and collapse to form a neutron star. Remnants that lose sufficient mass will end up as massive, isolated ONe or Si WDs.
  • Observations of luminous flares resulting from the possible tidal disruption of stars by supermassive black holes have raised a number of puzzles. Outstanding questions include the origin of the optical and ultraviolet (UV) flux, the weakness of hydrogen lines in the spectrum, and the occasional simultaneous observation of x-rays. Here we study the emission from tidal disruption events (TDEs) produced as radiation from black hole accretion propagates through an extended, optically thick envelope formed from stellar debris. We analytically describe key physics controlling spectrum formation, and present detailed radiative transfer calculations that model the spectral energy distribution (SED) and optical line strengths of TDEs near peak brightness. The steady-state transfer is coupled to a non local thermodynamic equilibrium treatment of the excitation and ionization states of hydrogen, helium and oxygen (as a representative metal). Our calculations show how an extended envelope can reprocess a fraction of soft x-rays and produce the observed optical fluxes of order 10^43 ergs per second. Variations in the mass or size of the envelope may help explain how the optical flux changes over time with roughly constant color. For high enough accretion luminosities, x-rays can highly ionize the reprocessing region and escape to be observed simultaneously with the optical flux, producing an SED not described by a single blackbody. Due to optical depth effects, hydrogen Balmer line emission is often strongly suppressed relative to helium line emission (with HeII-to-H line ratios of at least 5:1 in some cases) even in the disruption of a solar-composition star. We discuss the implications of our results to understanding the type of stars destroyed in TDEs and the physical processes responsible for producing the observed flares.
  • We present optical spectra of the nearby Type Ia supernova SN 2011fe at 100, 205, 311, 349, and 578 days post-maximum light, as well as an ultraviolet spectrum obtained with Hubble Space Telescope at 360 days post-maximum light. We compare these observations with synthetic spectra produced with the radiative transfer code PHOENIX. The day +100 spectrum can be well fit with models which neglect collisional and radiative data for forbidden lines. Curiously, including this data and recomputing the fit yields a quite similar spectrum, but with different combinations of lines forming some of the stronger features. At day +205 and later epochs, forbidden lines dominate much of the optical spectrum formation; however, our results indicate that recombination, not collisional excitation, is the most influential physical process driving spectrum formation at these late times. Consequently, our synthetic optical and UV spectra at all epochs presented here are formed almost exclusively through recombination-driven fluorescence. Furthermore, our models suggest that the ultraviolet spectrum even as late as day +360 is optically thick and consists of permitted lines from several iron-peak species. These results indicate that the transition to the "nebular" phase in Type Ia supernovae is complex and highly wavelength-dependent.