• This work studies distributed learning in the spirit of Yao's model of communication complexity: consider a two-party setting, where each of the players gets a list of labelled examples and they communicate in order to jointly perform some learning task. To naturally fit into the framework of learning theory, the players can send each other examples (as well as bits) where each example/bit costs one unit of communication. This enables a uniform treatment of infinite classes such as half-spaces in $\mathbb{R}^d$, which are ubiquitous in machine learning. We study several fundamental questions in this model. For example, we provide combinatorial characterizations of the classes that can be learned with efficient communication in the proper-case as well as in the improper-case. These findings imply unconditional separations between various learning contexts, e.g.\ realizable versus agnostic learning, proper versus improper learning, etc. The derivation of these results hinges on a type of decision problems we term "{\it realizability problems}" where the goal is deciding whether a distributed input sample is consistent with an hypothesis from a pre-specified class. From a technical perspective, the protocols we use are based on ideas from machine learning theory and the impossibility results are based on ideas from communication complexity theory.
  • We investigate the problem of identity testing for multidimensional histogram distributions. A distribution $p: D \rightarrow \mathbb{R}_+$, where $D \subseteq \mathbb{R}^d$, is called a {$k$-histogram} if there exists a partition of the domain into $k$ axis-aligned rectangles such that $p$ is constant within each such rectangle. Histograms are one of the most fundamental non-parametric families of distributions and have been extensively studied in computer science and statistics. We give the first identity tester for this problem with {\em sub-learning} sample complexity in any fixed dimension and a nearly-matching sample complexity lower bound. More specifically, let $q$ be an unknown $d$-dimensional $k$-histogram and $p$ be an explicitly given $k$-histogram. We want to correctly distinguish, with probability at least $2/3$, between the case that $p = q$ versus $\|p-q\|_1 \geq \epsilon$. We design a computationally efficient algorithm for this hypothesis testing problem with sample complexity $O((\sqrt{k}/\epsilon^2) \log^{O(d)}(k/\epsilon))$. Our algorithm is robust to model misspecification, i.e., succeeds even if $q$ is only promised to be {\em close} to a $k$-histogram. Moreover, for $k = 2^{\Omega(d)}$, we show a nearly-matching sample complexity lower bound of $\Omega((\sqrt{k}/\epsilon^2) (\log(k/\epsilon)/d)^{\Omega(d)})$ when $d\geq 2$. Prior to our work, the sample complexity of the $d=1$ case was well-understood, but no algorithm with sub-learning sample complexity was known, even for $d=2$. Our new upper and lower bounds have interesting conceptual implications regarding the relation between learning and testing in this setting.
  • Robust estimation is much more challenging in high dimensions than it is in one dimension: Most techniques either lead to intractable optimization problems or estimators that can tolerate only a tiny fraction of errors. Recent work in theoretical computer science has shown that, in appropriate distributional models, it is possible to robustly estimate the mean and covariance with polynomial time algorithms that can tolerate a constant fraction of corruptions, independent of the dimension. However, the sample and time complexity of these algorithms is prohibitively large for high-dimensional applications. In this work, we address both of these issues by establishing sample complexity bounds that are optimal, up to logarithmic factors, as well as giving various refinements that allow the algorithms to tolerate a much larger fraction of corruptions. Finally, we show on both synthetic and real data that our algorithms have state-of-the-art performance and suddenly make high-dimensional robust estimation a realistic possibility.
  • In high dimensions, most machine learning methods are brittle to even a small fraction of structured outliers. To address this, we introduce a new meta-algorithm that can take in a base learner such as least squares or stochastic gradient descent, and harden the learner to be resistant to outliers. Our method, Sever, possesses strong theoretical guarantees yet is also highly scalable -- beyond running the base learner itself, it only requires computing the top singular vector of a certain $n \times d$ matrix. We apply Sever on a drug design dataset and a spam classification dataset, and find that in both cases it has substantially greater robustness than several baselines. On the spam dataset, with $1\%$ corruptions, we achieved $7.4\%$ test error, compared to $13.4\%-20.5\%$ for the baselines, and $3\%$ error on the uncorrupted dataset. Similarly, on the drug design dataset, with $10\%$ corruptions, we achieved $1.42$ mean-squared error test error, compared to $1.51$-$2.33$ for the baselines, and $1.23$ error on the uncorrupted dataset.
  • We present an algebraic method to study four-dimensional toric varieties by lifting matrix equations from the special linear group ${\rm SL}_2({\mathbb Z})$ to its preimage in the universal cover of ${\rm SL}_2({\mathbb R})$. With this method we recover the classification of two-dimensional toric fans, and obtain a description of their semitoric analogue. As an application to symplectic geometry of Hamiltonian systems, we give a concise proof of the connectivity of the moduli space of toric integrable systems in dimension four, recovering a known result, and extend it to the case of semitoric integrable systems with a fixed number of focus-focus points and which are in the same twisting index class. In particular, we show that any semitoric system with precisely one focus-focus singular point can be continuously deformed into a system in the same isomorphism class as the Jaynes-Cummings model from optics.
  • A natural number is a binary $k$'th power if its binary representation consists of $k$ consecutive identical blocks. We prove an analogue of Waring's theorem for sums of binary $k$'th powers. More precisely, we show that for each integer $k \geq 2$, there exists a positive integer $W(k)$ such that every sufficiently large multiple of $E_k := \gcd(2^k - 1, k)$ is the sum of at most $W(k)$ binary $k$'th powers. (The hypothesis of being a multiple of $E_k$ cannot be omitted, since we show that the $\gcd$ of the binary $k$'th powers is $E_k$.) Also, we explain how our results can be extended to arbitrary integer bases $b > 2$.
  • We study the problem of generalized uniformity testing \cite{BC17} of a discrete probability distribution: Given samples from a probability distribution $p$ over an {\em unknown} discrete domain $\mathbf{\Omega}$, we want to distinguish, with probability at least $2/3$, between the case that $p$ is uniform on some {\em subset} of $\mathbf{\Omega}$ versus $\epsilon$-far, in total variation distance, from any such uniform distribution. We establish tight bounds on the sample complexity of generalized uniformity testing. In more detail, we present a computationally efficient tester whose sample complexity is optimal, up to constant factors, and a matching information-theoretic lower bound. Specifically, we show that the sample complexity of generalized uniformity testing is $\Theta\left(1/(\epsilon^{4/3}\|p\|_3) + 1/(\epsilon^{2} \|p\|_2) \right)$.
  • We present a simple Logspace algorithm that solves the Unary Subset-Sum problem.
  • We study the efficient learnability of geometric concept classes - specifically, low-degree polynomial threshold functions (PTFs) and intersections of halfspaces - when a fraction of the data is adversarially corrupted. We give the first polynomial-time PAC learning algorithms for these concept classes with dimension-independent error guarantees in the presence of nasty noise under the Gaussian distribution. In the nasty noise model, an omniscient adversary can arbitrarily corrupt a small fraction of both the unlabeled data points and their labels. This model generalizes well-studied noise models, including the malicious noise model and the agnostic (adversarial label noise) model. Prior to our work, the only concept class for which efficient malicious learning algorithms were known was the class of origin-centered halfspaces. Specifically, our robust learning algorithm for low-degree PTFs succeeds under a number of tame distributions -- including the Gaussian distribution and, more generally, any log-concave distribution with (approximately) known low-degree moments. For LTFs under the Gaussian distribution, we give a polynomial-time algorithm that achieves error $O(\epsilon)$, where $\epsilon$ is the noise rate. At the core of our PAC learning results is an efficient algorithm to approximate the low-degree Chow-parameters of any bounded function in the presence of nasty noise. To achieve this, we employ an iterative spectral method for outlier detection and removal, inspired by recent work in robust unsupervised learning. Our aforementioned algorithm succeeds for a range of distributions satisfying mild concentration bounds and moment assumptions. The correctness of our robust learning algorithm for intersections of halfspaces makes essential use of a novel robust inverse independence lemma that may be of broader interest.
  • We study the problem of estimating multivariate log-concave probability density functions. We prove the first sample complexity upper bound for learning log-concave densities on $\mathbb{R}^d$, for all $d \geq 1$. Prior to our work, no upper bound on the sample complexity of this learning problem was known for the case of $d>3$. In more detail, we give an estimator that, for any $d \ge 1$ and $\epsilon>0$, draws $\tilde{O}_d \left( (1/\epsilon)^{(d+5)/2} \right)$ samples from an unknown target log-concave density on $\mathbb{R}^d$, and outputs a hypothesis that (with high probability) is $\epsilon$-close to the target, in total variation distance. Our upper bound on the sample complexity comes close to the known lower bound of $\Omega_d \left( (1/\epsilon)^{(d+1)/2} \right)$ for this problem.
  • We study an extension of active learning in which the learning algorithm may ask the annotator to compare the distances of two examples from the boundary of their label-class. For example, in a recommendation system application (say for restaurants), the annotator may be asked whether she liked or disliked a specific restaurant (a label query); or which one of two restaurants did she like more (a comparison query). We focus on the class of half spaces, and show that under natural assumptions, such as large margin or bounded bit-description of the input examples, it is possible to reveal all the labels of a sample of size $n$ using approximately $O(\log n)$ queries. This implies an exponential improvement over classical active learning, where only label queries are allowed. We complement these results by showing that if any of these assumptions is removed then, in the worst case, $\Omega(n)$ queries are required. Our results follow from a new general framework of active learning with additional queries. We identify a combinatorial dimension, called the \emph{inference dimension}, that captures the query complexity when each additional query is determined by $O(1)$ examples (such as comparison queries, each of which is determined by the two compared examples). Our results for half spaces follow by bounding the inference dimension in the cases discussed above.
  • We describe a general technique that yields the first {\em Statistical Query lower bounds} for a range of fundamental high-dimensional learning problems involving Gaussian distributions. Our main results are for the problems of (1) learning Gaussian mixture models (GMMs), and (2) robust (agnostic) learning of a single unknown Gaussian distribution. For each of these problems, we show a {\em super-polynomial gap} between the (information-theoretic) sample complexity and the computational complexity of {\em any} Statistical Query algorithm for the problem. Our SQ lower bound for Problem (1) is qualitatively matched by known learning algorithms for GMMs. Our lower bound for Problem (2) implies that the accuracy of the robust learning algorithm in~\cite{DiakonikolasKKLMS16} is essentially best possible among all polynomial-time SQ algorithms. Our SQ lower bounds are attained via a unified moment-matching technique that is useful in other contexts and may be of broader interest. Our technique yields nearly-tight lower bounds for a number of related unsupervised estimation problems. Specifically, for the problems of (3) robust covariance estimation in spectral norm, and (4) robust sparse mean estimation, we establish a quadratic {\em statistical--computational tradeoff} for SQ algorithms, matching known upper bounds. Finally, our technique can be used to obtain tight sample complexity lower bounds for high-dimensional {\em testing} problems. Specifically, for the classical problem of robustly {\em testing} an unknown mean (known covariance) Gaussian, our technique implies an information-theoretic sample lower bound that scales {\em linearly} in the dimension. Our sample lower bound matches the sample complexity of the corresponding robust {\em learning} problem and separates the sample complexity of robust testing from standard (non-robust) testing.
  • We construct near optimal linear decision trees for a variety of decision problems in combinatorics and discrete geometry. For example, for any constant $k$, we construct linear decision trees that solve the $k$-SUM problem on $n$ elements using $O(n \log^2 n)$ linear queries. Moreover, the queries we use are comparison queries, which compare the sums of two $k$-subsets; when viewed as linear queries, comparison queries are $2k$-sparse and have only $\{-1,0,1\}$ coefficients. We give similar constructions for sorting sumsets $A+B$ and for solving the SUBSET-SUM problem, both with optimal number of queries, up to poly-logarithmic terms. Our constructions are based on the notion of "inference dimension", recently introduced by the authors in the context of active classification with comparison queries. This can be viewed as another contribution to the fruitful link between machine learning and discrete geometry, which goes back to the discovery of the VC dimension.
  • We study the fundamental problem of learning the parameters of a high-dimensional Gaussian in the presence of noise -- where an $\varepsilon$-fraction of our samples were chosen by an adversary. We give robust estimators that achieve estimation error $O(\varepsilon)$ in the total variation distance, which is optimal up to a universal constant that is independent of the dimension. In the case where just the mean is unknown, our robustness guarantee is optimal up to a factor of $\sqrt{2}$ and the running time is polynomial in $d$ and $1/\epsilon$. When both the mean and covariance are unknown, the running time is polynomial in $d$ and quasipolynomial in $1/\varepsilon$. Moreover all of our algorithms require only a polynomial number of samples. Our work shows that the same sorts of error guarantees that were established over fifty years ago in the one-dimensional setting can also be achieved by efficient algorithms in high-dimensional settings.
  • We investigate the problem of testing the equivalence between two discrete histograms. A {\em $k$-histogram} over $[n]$ is a probability distribution that is piecewise constant over some set of $k$ intervals over $[n]$. Histograms have been extensively studied in computer science and statistics. Given a set of samples from two $k$-histogram distributions $p, q$ over $[n]$, we want to distinguish (with high probability) between the cases that $p = q$ and $\|p-q\|_1 \geq \epsilon$. The main contribution of this paper is a new algorithm for this testing problem and a nearly matching information-theoretic lower bound. Specifically, the sample complexity of our algorithm matches our lower bound up to a logarithmic factor, improving on previous work by polynomial factors in the relevant parameters. Our algorithmic approach applies in a more general setting and yields improved sample upper bounds for testing closeness of other structured distributions as well.
  • A symplectic semitoric manifold is a symplectic $4$-manifold endowed with a Hamiltonian $(S^1 \times \mathbb{R})$-action satisfying certain conditions. The goal of this paper is to construct a new symplectic invariant of symplectic semitoric manifolds, the helix, and give applications. The helix is a symplectic analogue of the fan of a nonsingular complete toric variety in algebraic geometry, that takes into account the effects of the monodromy near focus-focus singularities. We give two applications of the helix: first, we use it to give a classification of the minimal models of symplectic semitoric manifolds, where "minimal" is in the sense of not admitting any blowdowns. The second application is an extension to the compact case of a well known result of V\~{u} Ngoc about the constraints posed on a symplectic semitoric manifold by the existence of focus-focus singularities. The helix permits to translate a symplectic geometric problem into an algebraic problem, and the paper describes a method to solve this type of algebraic problem.
  • We consider the problem of estimating a Fourier-sparse signal from noisy samples, where the sampling is done over some interval $[0, T]$ and the frequencies can be "off-grid". Previous methods for this problem required the gap between frequencies to be above 1/T, the threshold required to robustly identify individual frequencies. We show the frequency gap is not necessary to estimate the signal as a whole: for arbitrary $k$-Fourier-sparse signals under $\ell_2$ bounded noise, we show how to estimate the signal with a constant factor growth of the noise and sample complexity polynomial in $k$ and logarithmic in the bandwidth and signal-to-noise ratio. As a special case, we get an algorithm to interpolate degree $d$ polynomials from noisy measurements, using $O(d)$ samples and increasing the noise by a constant factor in $\ell_2$.
  • An $(n, k)$-Poisson Multinomial Distribution (PMD) is a random variable of the form $X = \sum_{i=1}^n X_i$, where the $X_i$'s are independent random vectors supported on the set of standard basis vectors in $\mathbb{R}^k.$ In this paper, we obtain a refined structural understanding of PMDs by analyzing their Fourier transform. As our core structural result, we prove that the Fourier transform of PMDs is {\em approximately sparse}, i.e., roughly speaking, its $L_1$-norm is small outside a small set. By building on this result, we obtain the following applications: {\bf Learning Theory.} We design the first computationally efficient learning algorithm for PMDs with respect to the total variation distance. Our algorithm learns an arbitrary $(n, k)$-PMD within variation distance $\epsilon$ using a near-optimal sample size of $\widetilde{O}_k(1/\epsilon^2),$ and runs in time $\widetilde{O}_k(1/\epsilon^2) \cdot \log n.$ Previously, no algorithm with a $\mathrm{poly}(1/\epsilon)$ runtime was known, even for $k=3.$ {\bf Game Theory.} We give the first efficient polynomial-time approximation scheme (EPTAS) for computing Nash equilibria in anonymous games. For normalized anonymous games with $n$ players and $k$ strategies, our algorithm computes a well-supported $\epsilon$-Nash equilibrium in time $n^{O(k^3)} \cdot (k/\epsilon)^{O(k^3\log(k/\epsilon)/\log\log(k/\epsilon))^{k-1}}.$ The best previous algorithm for this problem had running time $n^{(f(k)/\epsilon)^k},$ where $f(k) = \Omega(k^{k^2})$, for any $k>2.$ {\bf Statistics.} We prove a multivariate central limit theorem (CLT) that relates an arbitrary PMD to a discretized multivariate Gaussian with the same mean and covariance, in total variation distance. Our new CLT strengthens the CLT of Valiant and Valiant by completely removing the dependence on $n$ in the error bound.
  • We study the {\em robust proper learning} of univariate log-concave distributions (over continuous and discrete domains). Given a set of samples drawn from an unknown target distribution, we want to compute a log-concave hypothesis distribution that is as close as possible to the target, in total variation distance. In this work, we give the first computationally efficient algorithm for this learning problem. Our algorithm achieves the information-theoretically optimal sample size (up to a constant factor), runs in polynomial time, and is robust to model misspecification with nearly-optimal error guarantees. Specifically, we give an algorithm that, on input $n=O(1/\eps^{5/2})$ samples from an unknown distribution $f$, runs in time $\widetilde{O}(n^{8/5})$, and outputs a log-concave hypothesis $h$ that (with high probability) satisfies $\dtv(h, f) = O(\opt)+\eps$, where $\opt$ is the minimum total variation distance between $f$ and the class of log-concave distributions. Our approach to the robust proper learning problem is quite flexible and may be applicable to many other univariate distribution families.
  • In this work, we give a novel general approach for distribution testing. We describe two techniques: our first technique gives sample-optimal testers, while our second technique gives matching sample lower bounds. As a consequence, we resolve the sample complexity of a wide variety of testing problems. Our upper bounds are obtained via a modular reduction-based approach. Our approach yields optimal testers for numerous problems by using a standard $\ell_2$-identity tester as a black-box. Using this recipe, we obtain simple estimators for a wide range of problems, encompassing most problems previously studied in the TCS literature, namely: (1) identity testing to a fixed distribution, (2) closeness testing between two unknown distributions (with equal/unequal sample sizes), (3) independence testing (in any number of dimensions), (4) closeness testing for collections of distributions, and (5) testing histograms. For all of these problems, our testers are sample-optimal, up to constant factors. With the exception of (1), ours are the {\em first sample-optimal testers for the corresponding problems.} Moreover, our estimators are significantly simpler to state and analyze compared to previous results. As an application of our reduction-based technique, we obtain the first {\em nearly instance-optimal} algorithm for testing equivalence between two {\em unknown} distributions. Moreover, our technique naturally generalizes to other metrics beyond the $\ell_1$-distance. Our lower bounds are obtained via a direct information-theoretic approach: Given a candidate hard instance, our proof proceeds by bounding the mutual information between appropriate random variables. While this is a classical method in information theory, prior to our work, it had not been used in distribution property testing.
  • In order to formally understand the power of neural computing, we first need to crack the frontier of threshold circuits with two and three layers, a regime that has been surprisingly intractable to analyze. We prove the first super-linear gate lower bounds and the first super-quadratic wire lower bounds for depth-two linear threshold circuits with arbitrary weights, and depth-three majority circuits computing an explicit function. $\bullet$ We prove that for all $\epsilon\gg \sqrt{\log(n)/n}$, the linear-time computable Andreev's function cannot be computed on a $(1/2+\epsilon)$-fraction of $n$-bit inputs by depth-two linear threshold circuits of $o(\epsilon^3 n^{3/2}/\log^3 n)$ gates, nor can it be computed with $o(\epsilon^{3} n^{5/2}/\log^{7/2} n)$ wires. This establishes an average-case ``size hierarchy'' for threshold circuits, as Andreev's function is computable by uniform depth-two circuits of $o(n^3)$ linear threshold gates, and by uniform depth-three circuits of $O(n)$ majority gates. $\bullet$ We present a new function in $P$ based on small-biased sets, which we prove cannot be computed by a majority vote of depth-two linear threshold circuits with $o(n^{3/2}/\log^3 n)$ gates, nor with $o(n^{5/2}/\log^{7/2}n)$ wires. $\bullet$ We give tight average-case (gate and wire) complexity results for computing PARITY with depth-two threshold circuits; the answer turns out to be the same as for depth-two majority circuits. The key is a new random restriction lemma for linear threshold functions. Our main analytical tool is the Littlewood-Offord Lemma from additive combinatorics.
  • We study the structure and learnability of sums of independent integer random variables (SIIRVs). For $k \in \mathbb{Z}_{+}$, a $k$-SIIRV of order $n \in \mathbb{Z}_{+}$ is the probability distribution of the sum of $n$ independent random variables each supported on $\{0, 1, \dots, k-1\}$. We denote by ${\cal S}_{n,k}$ the set of all $k$-SIIRVs of order $n$. In this paper, we tightly characterize the sample and computational complexity of learning $k$-SIIRVs. More precisely, we design a computationally efficient algorithm that uses $\widetilde{O}(k/\epsilon^2)$ samples, and learns an arbitrary $k$-SIIRV within error $\epsilon,$ in total variation distance. Moreover, we show that the {\em optimal} sample complexity of this learning problem is $\Theta((k/\epsilon^2)\sqrt{\log(1/\epsilon)}).$ Our algorithm proceeds by learning the Fourier transform of the target $k$-SIIRV in its effective support. Its correctness relies on the {\em approximate sparsity} of the Fourier transform of $k$-SIIRVs -- a structural property that we establish, roughly stating that the Fourier transform of $k$-SIIRVs has small magnitude outside a small set. Along the way we prove several new structural results about $k$-SIIRVs. As one of our main structural contributions, we give an efficient algorithm to construct a sparse {\em proper} $\epsilon$-cover for ${\cal S}_{n,k},$ in total variation distance. We also obtain a novel geometric characterization of the space of $k$-SIIRVs. Our characterization allows us to prove a tight lower bound on the size of $\epsilon$-covers for ${\cal S}_{n,k}$, and is the key ingredient in our tight sample complexity lower bound. Our approach of exploiting the sparsity of the Fourier transform in distribution learning is general, and has recently found additional applications.
  • We give an algorithm for properly learning Poisson binomial distributions. A Poisson binomial distribution (PBD) of order $n$ is the discrete probability distribution of the sum of $n$ mutually independent Bernoulli random variables. Given $\widetilde{O}(1/\epsilon^2)$ samples from an unknown PBD $\mathbf{p}$, our algorithm runs in time $(1/\epsilon)^{O(\log \log (1/\epsilon))}$, and outputs a hypothesis PBD that is $\epsilon$-close to $\mathbf{p}$ in total variation distance. The previously best known running time for properly learning PBDs was $(1/\epsilon)^{O(\log(1/\epsilon))}$. As one of our main contributions, we provide a novel structural characterization of PBDs. We prove that, for all $\epsilon >0,$ there exists an explicit collection $\cal{M}$ of $(1/\epsilon)^{O(\log \log (1/\epsilon))}$ vectors of multiplicities, such that for any PBD $\mathbf{p}$ there exists a PBD $\mathbf{q}$ with $O(\log(1/\epsilon))$ distinct parameters whose multiplicities are given by some element of ${\cal M}$, such that $\mathbf{q}$ is $\epsilon$-close to $\mathbf{p}$. Our proof combines tools from Fourier analysis and algebraic geometry. Our approach to the proper learning problem is as follows: Starting with an accurate non-proper hypothesis, we fit a PBD to this hypothesis. More specifically, we essentially start with the hypothesis computed by the computationally efficient non-proper learning algorithm in our recent work~\cite{DKS15}. Our aforementioned structural characterization allows us to reduce the corresponding fitting problem to a collection of $(1/\epsilon)^{O(\log \log(1/\epsilon))}$ systems of low-degree polynomial inequalities. We show that each such system can be solved in time $(1/\epsilon)^{O(\log \log(1/\epsilon))}$, which yields the overall running time of our algorithm.
  • We determine for what proportion of integers $h$ one now knows that there are infinitely many prime pairs $p,\ p+h$ as a consequence of the Zhang-Maynard-Tao theorem. We consider the natural generalization of this to $k$-tuples of integers, and we determine the limit of what can be deduced assuming only the Zhang-Maynard-Tao theorem.
  • We give a general unified method that can be used for $L_1$ {\em closeness testing} of a wide range of univariate structured distribution families. More specifically, we design a sample optimal and computationally efficient algorithm for testing the equivalence of two unknown (potentially arbitrary) univariate distributions under the $\mathcal{A}_k$-distance metric: Given sample access to distributions with density functions $p, q: I \to \mathbb{R}$, we want to distinguish between the cases that $p=q$ and $\|p-q\|_{\mathcal{A}_k} \ge \epsilon$ with probability at least $2/3$. We show that for any $k \ge 2, \epsilon>0$, the {\em optimal} sample complexity of the $\mathcal{A}_k$-closeness testing problem is $\Theta(\max\{ k^{4/5}/\epsilon^{6/5}, k^{1/2}/\epsilon^2 \})$. This is the first $o(k)$ sample algorithm for this problem, and yields new, simple $L_1$ closeness testers, in most cases with optimal sample complexity, for broad classes of structured distributions.