• We present a systematic study of mid-infrared (mid-IR) emission from 141 nearby supernovae (SNe) observed with the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) on Spitzer.These SNe reside in one of the 190 galaxies within 20 Mpc drawn from the ongoing SPIRITS program. We detect 8 Type Ia SNe and 36 core-collapse SNe. All Type I SNe become undetectable within 3 years of explosion. About 22$\pm$11% of Type II SNe continue to be detected at late-times. Dust luminosity, temperature, and a lower liit on mass are obtained by fitting the SED using photometry with IRAC bands 1 and 2. The mass estimate does not distinguish between pre-existing and newly produced dust. We observe warm dust masses between $10^{-2}$ and $10^{-6}$ $\rm M_{\odot}$ and dust temperatures from 200 K to 1280 K.We present detailed case studies of two extreme Type II-P SNe: SN 2011ja and 2014bi. SN 2011ja was over-luminous ([4.5] = -15.6 mag) at 900 days post-explosion accompanied by the growing dust mass. This suggests either an episode of dust formation or an intensifying CSM interactions heating up pre-existing dust. SN 2014bi showed a factor of 10 decrease in dust mass over one month suggesting either an episode of dust destruction or a fading source of dust heating. A rebrightening of the Type Ib SN 2014C is observed and attributed to CSM interactions. This observation adds to a small number of stripped-envelope SNe that have mid-IR excess. The observations suggest that the CSM shell around SN 2014C is originated from an LBV-like eruption roughly 100 years before the explosion. We also report detections of SN1974E, 1979C, 1980K, 1986J, and 1993J detected more than 20 years post-explosion. The number of outlying SNe identified in this work demonstrates the power of late time mid-IR observations of a large sample of SNe to identify events with unusual evolution.
  • We present multi-wavelength observations and modeling of Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) that exhibit a simultaneous re-brightening in their X-ray and optical light curves, and are also detected at radio wavelengths. We show that the re-brightening episodes can be modeled by injection of energy into the blastwave and that in all cases the energy injection rate falls within the theoretical bounds expected for a distribution of energy with ejecta Lorentz factor. Our measured values of the circumburst density, jet opening angle, and beaming corrected kinetic energy are consistent with the distribution of these parameters for long-duration GRBs at both z~1 and z>6, suggesting that the jet launching mechanism and environment of these events are similar to that of GRBs that do not have bumps in their light curves. However, events exhibiting re-brightening episodes have lower radiative efficiencies than average, suggesting that a majority of the kinetic energy of the outflow is carried by slow-moving ejecta, which is further supported by steep measured distributions of the ejecta energy as a function of Lorentz factor. We do not find evidence for reverse shocks over the energy injection period, implying that the onset of energy injection is a gentle process. We further show that GRBs exhibiting simultaneous X-ray and optical re-brightenings are likely the tail of a distribution of events with varying rates of energy injection, forming the most extreme events in their class. Future X-ray observations of GRB afterglows with Swift and its successors will thus likely discover several more such events, while radio follow-up and multi-wavelength modeling of similar events will unveil the role of energy injection in GRB afterglows.
  • Here we propose a new gamma-ray burst (GRB) mission, the Next Generation Rapid-Response GRB Observatory (NGRG). As with Swift, GRBs are initially located with a coded-mask X-ray camera. However, the NGRG has two new features: First, a beam-steering system to begin optical observations within ~ 1 s after location; second, a near-IR (NIR) camera viewing the same sky, for sensitivity to extinguished bursts. These features allow measurement of the rise phase of GRB optical-NIR emission. Thus far, the rise time and transition between prompt and afterglow in the optical and NIR are rarely measured. Rapid-response measurements explore many science topics including optical emission mechanisms (synchrotron vs. SSC, photospheric emission) and jet characteristics (reverse vs. forward shock emission, baryon-dominated vs. magnetic dominated). Rapid optical-NIR response can measure dynamic evolution of extinction due to vaporization of dust, and separate star system and galaxy dust extinction. We discuss these measurements, giving reliable detection rate estimates from analysis of Swift data and scaled Swift performance. The NGRG will explore optical/NIR emission measured earlier than ever before, and potentially fainter, more extinguished GRBs than ever before. In the current era, costs are important. Our proposed modest NGRG can still produce new GRB science, while providing rapid GRB alerts for the entire community for post-Swift GRB science. We show that an X-ray instrument barely 1/5 the area of Swift BAT will yield a significant fraction of Swift's detection rate: more than 65 X-ray, and with a 30 cm optical-IR telescope and modern cameras, more than 19 NIR and 14 optical detections each year. In addition, active feedback control of the beam-steering would remove the need for arc sec stabilization of the spacecraft, for a substantial cost saving.
  • High-dispersion observations of the Na I D 5890, 5896 and K I 7665, 7699 interstellar lines, and the diffuse interstellar band at 5780 Angstroms in the spectra of 32 Type Ia supernovae are used as an independent means of probing dust extinction. We show that the dust extinction of the objects where the diffuse interstellar band at 5780 Angstroms is detected is consistent with the visual extinction derived from the supernova colors. This strongly suggests that the dust producing the extinction is predominantly located in the interstellar medium of the host galaxies and not in circumstellar material associated with the progenitor system. One quarter of the supernovae display anomalously large Na I column densities in comparison to the amount of dust extinction derived from their colors. Remarkably, all of the cases of unusually strong Na I D absorption correspond to "Blueshifted" profiles in the classification scheme of Sternberg et al. (2011). This coincidence suggests that outflowing circumstellar gas is responsible for at least some of the cases of anomalously large Na I column densities. Two supernovae with unusually strong Na I D absorption showed essentially normal K I column densities for the dust extinction implied by their colors, but this does not appear to be a universal characteristic. Overall, we find the most accurate predictor of individual supernova extinction to be the equivalent width of the diffuse interstellar band at 5780 Angstroms, and provide an empirical relation for its use. Finally, we identify ways of producing significant enhancements of the Na abundance of circumstellar material in both the single-degenerate and double-degenerate scenarios for the progenitor system.
  • We present our observations of SN 2010mb, a Type Ic SN lacking spectroscopic signatures of H and He. SN 2010mb has a slowly-declining light curve ($\sim600\,$days) that cannot be powered by $^{56}$Ni/$^{56}$Co radioactivity, the common energy source for Type Ic SNe. We detect signatures of interaction with hydrogen-free CSM including a blue quasi-continuum and, uniquely, narrow oxygen emission lines that require high densities ($\sim10^9$cm$^{-3}$). From the observed spectra and light curve we estimate that the amount of material involved in the interaction was $\sim3$M$_{\odot}$. Our observations are in agreement with models of pulsational pair-instability SNe described in the literature.
  • [ABRIDGED] We report the results of a 944-epoch survey for transient sources with archival data from the Very Large Array spanning 22 years with a typical epoch separation of 7 days. Observations were obtained at 5 or 8.4 GHz for a single field of view with a full-width at half-maximum of 8.6' and 5.1', respectively, and achieved a typical point-source detection threshold at the beam center of ~300 microJy per epoch. Ten transient sources were detected with a significance threshold such that only one false positive would be expected. Of these transients, eight were detected in only a single epoch. Two transients were too faint to be detected in individual epochs but were detected in two-month averages. None of the ten transients was detected in longer-term averages or associated with persistent emission in the deep image produced from the combination of all epochs. The cumulative rate for the short timescale radio transients above 370 microJy at 5 and 8.4 GHz is 0.07 < R < 40 deg^-2 yr^-1, where the uncertainty is due to the unknown duration of the transients, 20 min < t_char < 7 days. A two-epoch survey for transients will detect 1.5 +/- 0.4 transient per square degrees above a flux density of 370 microJy. Two transients are associated with galaxies at z=0.040 and z=0.249. These may be similar to the peculiar Type Ib/c radio supernova SN 1998bw associated with GRB 980428. Six transients have no counterparts in the optical or infrared (R=27, Ks=18). The hosts and progenitors of these transients are unknown.
  • It is now accepted that long duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are produced during the collapse of a massive star. The standard "collapsar" model predicts that a broad-lined and luminous Type Ic core-collapse supernova (SN) accompanies every long-duration GRB. This association has been confirmed in observations of several nearby GRBs. Here we present observations of two nearby long-duration GRBs that challenge this simple view. In the GRBs 060505 and 060614 we demonstrate that no SN emission accompanied these long-duration bursts, down to limits hundreds of times fainter than the archetypal SN 1998bw that accompanied GRB 980425, and fainter than any Type Ic SN ever observed. Multi-band observations of the early afterglows, as well as spectroscopy of the host galaxies, exclude the possibility of significant dust obscuration and show that the bursts originated in star-forming regions. The absence of a SN to such deep limits is qualitatively different from all previous nearby long GRBs and suggests a new phenomenological type of massive stellar death. From the supplementary material: Now we have observed SN-less GRBs in star-forming regions, suggesting that a non-detection of a SN does not preclude a massive progenitor. The position of the GRB, i.e. in a star-forming region or in an older component, may be the only way to discriminate between merging compact objects and massive stars as progenitors. In fact, several host galaxies for short GRBs have been found to be as actively star-forming as some host galaxies of long-duration GRBs. The GRB labels "long" and "short" have become synonymous with "massive stars" and "other progenitors". These distinctions may need to be relaxed.