• The dynamics of single carrier wavepackets in nonlinear wave problems over periodic structures can be often formally approximated by the constant coefficient nonlinear Schr\"odinger equation (NLS) as an effective model for the wavepacket envelope. We provide a detailed proof of this approximation result for the Gross-Pitaevskii equation (GP) and a semilinear wave equation, both with periodic coefficients in $\mathbb{N}\ni d$ spatial dimensions and with cubic nonlinearities. The proof is carried out in Bloch expansion variables with estimates in an $L^1$-type norm, which translates to an estimate of the supremum norm of the error. The regularity required from the periodic coefficients in order to ensure a small residual and a small error is discussed. We also present a numerical example in two spatial dimensions confirming the approximation result and presenting an approximate traveling solitary wave in the GP with periodic coefficients.
  • Different Markov chains can be used for approximate sampling of a distribution given by an unnormalized density function with respect to the Lebesgue measure. The hit-and-run, (hybrid) slice sampler and random walk Metropolis algorithm are popular tools to simulate such Markov chains. We develop a general approach to compare the efficiency of these sampling procedures by the use of a partial ordering of their Markov operators, the covariance ordering. In particular, we show that the hit-and-run and the simple slice sampler are more efficient than a hybrid slice sampler based on hit-and-run which, itself, is more efficient than a (lazy) random walk Metropolis algorithm.
  • We consider parameter estimation in hidden finite state space Markov models with time-dependent inhomogeneous noise, where the inhomogeneity vanishes sufficiently fast. Based on the concept of asymptotic mean stationary processes we prove that the maximum likelihood and a quasi-maximum likelihood estimator (QMLE) are strongly consistent. The computation of the QMLE ignores the inhomogeneity, hence, is much simpler and robust. The theory is motivated by an example from biophysics and applied to a Poisson- and linear Gaussian model.
  • For a point set of $n$ elements in the $d$-dimensional unit cube and a class of test sets we are interested in the largest volume of a test set which does not contain any point. For all natural numbers $n$, $d$ and under the assumption of a $delta$-cover with cardinality $\vert \Gamma_\delta \vert$ we prove that there is a point set, such that the largest volume of such a test set without any point is bounded by $\frac{\log \vert \Gamma_\delta \vert}{n} + \delta$. For axis-parallel boxes on the unit cube this leads to a volume of at most $\frac{4d}{n}\log(\frac{9n}{d})$ and on the torus to $\frac{4d}{n}\log (2n)$.
  • The Phase Tensor (PT) marked a breakthrough in understanding and analysis of electric galvanic distortion but does not contain any impedance amplitude information and therefore cannot quantify resistivity without complementary data. We formulate a complete impedance tensor decomposition into the PT and a new Amplitude Tensor (AT) that is shown to be complementary and mathematically independent to the PT. We show that for the special cases of 1D and 2D models, the geometric AT parameters (strike and skew angles) converge to PT parameters and the singular values of the AT correspond to the impedance amplitudes of the transverse electric and transverse magnetic modes. In all cases, we show that the AT contains both galvanic and inductive amplitudes, the latter of which is argued to be physically related to the inductive information of the PT. The geometric parameters of the inductive AT and the PT represent the same geometry of the subsurface conductivity distribution that is affected by induction processes, and therefore we hypothesise that geometric PT parameters can be used to approximate the inductive AT. Then, this hypothesis leads to the estimation of the galvanic AT which is equal to the galvanic electric distortion tensor at the lowest measured period. This estimation of the galvanic distortion departs from the common assumption to consider 1D or 2D regional structures and can be applied for general 3D subsurfaces. We demonstrate exemplarily with an explicit formulation how our hypothesis can be used to recover the galvanic electric anisotropic distortion for 2D subsurfaces, which was, until now, believed to be indeterminable for 2D data. Moreover, we illustrate the AT as a mapping tool and we compare it to the PT with both synthetic and real data examples. Lastly, we argue that the AT can provide important non-redundant amplitude information to PT inversions.
  • The problem of finding the largest empty axis-parallel box amidst a point configuration is a classical problem in computational geometry. It is known that the volume of the largest empty box is of asymptotic order $1/n$ for $n\to\infty$ and fixed dimension $d$. However, it is natural to assume that the volume of the largest empty box increases as $d$ gets larger. In the present paper we prove that this actually is the case: for every set of $n$ points in $[0, 1]^d$ there exists an empty box of volume at least $c_d n^{-1}$ , where $c_d \to \infty$ as $d\to \infty$. More precisely, $c_d$ is at least of order roughly $\log d$.
  • Perturbation theory for Markov chains addresses the question how small differences in the transitions of Markov chains are reflected in differences between their distributions. We prove powerful and flexible bounds on the distance of the $n$th step distributions of two Markov chains when one of them satisfies a Wasserstein ergodicity condition. Our work is motivated by the recent interest in approximate Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods in the analysis of big data sets. By using an approach based on Lyapunov functions, we provide estimates for geometrically ergodic Markov chains under weak assumptions. In an autoregressive model, our bounds cannot be improved in general. We illustrate our theory by showing quantitative estimates for approximate versions of two prominent MCMC algorithms, the Metropolis-Hastings and stochastic Langevin algorithms.
  • Metropolis algorithms for approximate sampling of probability measures on infinite dimensional Hilbert spaces are considered and a generalization of the preconditioned Crank-Nicolson (pCN) proposal is introduced. The new proposal is able to incorporate information of the measure of interest. A numerical simulation of a Bayesian inverse problem indicates that a Metropolis algorithm with such a proposal performs independent of the state space dimension and the variance of the observational noise. Moreover, a qualitative convergence result is provided by a comparison argument for spectral gaps. In particular, it is shown that the generalization inherits geometric ergodicity from the Metropolis algorithm with pCN proposal.
  • Markov chains can be used to generate samples whose distribution approximates a given target distribution. The quality of the samples of such Markov chains can be measured by the discrepancy between the empirical distribution of the samples and the target distribution. We prove upper bounds on this discrepancy under the assumption that the Markov chain is uniformly ergodic and the driver sequence is deterministic rather than independent $U(0,1)$ random variables. In particular, we show the existence of driver sequences for which the discrepancy of the Markov chain from the target distribution with respect to certain test sets converges with (almost) the usual Monte Carlo rate of $n^{-1/2}$.
  • We prove explicit error bounds for Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods to compute expectations of functions with unbounded stationary variance. We assume that there is a $p\in(1,2)$ so that the functions have finite $L_p$-norm. For uniformly ergodic Markov chains we obtain error bounds with the optimal order of convergence $n^{1/p-1}$ and if there exists a spectral gap we almost get the optimal order. Further, a burn-in period is taken into account and a recipe for choosing the burn-in is provided.
  • We study the approximation of high-dimensional rank one tensors using point evaluations and consider deterministic as well as randomized algorithms. We prove that for certain parameters (smoothness and norm of the $r$th derivative) this problem is intractable while for other parameters the problem is tractable and the complexity is only polynomial in the dimension for every fixed $\varepsilon>0$. For randomized algorithms we completely characterize the set of parameters that lead to easy or difficult problems, respectively. In the "difficult" case we modify the class to obtain a tractable problem: The problem gets tractable with a polynomial (in the dimension) complexity if the support of the function is not too small.
  • Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations are modeled as driven by true random numbers. We consider variance bounding Markov chains driven by a deterministic sequence of numbers. The star-discrepancy provides a measure of efficiency of such Markov chain quasi-Monte Carlo methods. We define a pull-back discrepancy of the driver sequence and state a close relation to the star-discrepancy of the Markov chain-quasi Monte Carlo samples. We prove that there exists a deterministic driver sequence such that the discrepancies decrease almost with the Monte Carlo rate $n^{1/2}$. As for MCMC simulations, a burn-in period can also be taken into account for Markov chain quasi-Monte Carlo to reduce the influence of the initial state. In particular, our discrepancy bound leads to an estimate of the error for the computation of expectations. To illustrate our theory we provide an example for the Metropolis algorithm based on a ball walk. Furthermore, under additional assumptions we prove the existence of a driver sequence such that the discrepancy of the corresponding deterministic Markov chain sample decreases with order $n^{-1+\delta}$ for every $\delta>0$.
  • It is known that the simple slice sampler has very robust convergence properties, however the class of problems where it can be implemented is limited. In contrast, we consider hybrid slice samplers which are easily implementable and where another Markov chain approximately samples the uniform distribution on each slice. Under appropriate assumptions on the Markov chain on the slice we show a lower bound and an upper bound of the spectral gap of the hybrid slice sampler in terms of the spectral gap of the simple slice sampler. An immediate consequence of this is that spectral gap and geometric ergodicity of the hybrid slice sampler can be concluded from spectral gap and geometric ergodicity of its simple version which is very well understood. These results indicate that robustness properties of the simple slice sampler are inherited by (appropriately designed) easily implementable hybrid versions and provide the first theoretical underpinning of their use in applications. We apply the developed theory and analyse a number of specific algorithms such as the stepping-out shrinkage slice sampling, hit-and-run slice sampling on very general multidimensional targets and an easily implementable combination of both procedures on fairly general and realistic multidimensional bimodal densities.
  • Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods are a very versatile and widely used tool to compute integrals and expectations. In this short survey we focus on error bounds, rules for choosing the burn in, high dimensional problems and tractability versus curse of dimension.
  • We prove explicit, i.e. non-asymptotic, error bounds for Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. The problem is to compute the expectation of a function f with respect to a measure {\pi}. Different convergence properties of Markov chains imply different error bounds. For uniformly ergodic and reversible Markov chains we prove a lower and an upper error bound with respect to the L2 -norm of f . If there exists an L2 -spectral gap, which is a weaker convergence property than uniform ergodicity, then we show an upper error bound with respect to the Lp -norm of f for p > 2. Usually a burn-in period is an efficient way to tune the algorithm. We provide and justify a recipe how to choose the burn-in period. The error bounds are applied to the problem of the integration with respect to a possibly unnormalized density. More precise, we consider the integration with respect to log-concave densities and the integration over convex bodies. By the use of the Metropolis algorithm based on a ball walk and the hit-and-run algorithm it is shown that both problems are polynomial tractable.
  • We prove positivity of the Markov operators that correspond to the hit-and-run algorithm, random scan Gibbs sampler, slice sampler and an Metropolis algorithm with positive proposal. In all of these cases the positivity is independent of the state space and the stationary distribution. In particular, the results show that it is not necessary to consider the lazy versions of these Markov chains. The proof relies on a well known lemma which relates the positivity of the product M T M^*, for some operators M and T, to the positivity of T. It remains to find that kind of representation of the Markov operator with a positive operator T.
  • We study the numerical computation of an expectation of a bounded function with respect to a measure given by a non-normalized density on a convex body. We assume that the density is log-concave, satisfies a variability condition and is not too narrow. We consider general convex bodies or even the whole $\R^d$ and show that the integration problem satisfies a refined form of tractability. The main tools are the hit-and-run algorithm and an error bound of a multi run Markov chain Monte Carlo method.
  • We study the error of reversible Markov chain Monte Carlo methods for approximating the expectation of a function. Explicit error bounds with respect to different norms of the function are proven. By the estimation the well known asymptotical limit of the error is attained, i.e. there is no gap between the estimate and the asymptotical behavior. We discuss the dependence of the error on a burn-in of the Markov chain. Furthermore we suggest and justify a specific burn-in for optimizing the algorithm.
  • We prove explicit, i.e., non-asymptotic, error bounds for Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods, such as the Metropolis algorithm. The problem is to compute the expectation (or integral) of f with respect to a measure which can be given by a density with respect to another measure. A straight simulation of the desired distribution by a random number generator is in general not possible. Thus it is reasonable to use Markov chain sampling with a burn-in. We study such an algorithm and extend the analysis of Lovasz and Simonovits (1993) to obtain an explicit error bound.