• Determining phenotype from genetic data is a fundamental challenge. Influenza A viruses undergo rapid antigenic drift and identification of emerging antigenic variants is critical to the vaccine selection process. Using former seasonal influenza A(H1N1) viruses, hemagglutinin sequence and corresponding antigenic data were analyzed in combination with 3-D structural information. We attributed variation in hemagglutination inhibition to individual amino acid substitutions and quantified their antigenic impact, validating a subset experimentally using reverse genetics. Substitutions identified as low-impact were shown to be a critical component of influenza antigenic evolution and by including these, as well as the high-impact substitutions often focused on, the accuracy of predicting antigenic phenotypes of emerging viruses from genotype was doubled. The ability to quantify the phenotypic impact of specific amino acid substitutions should help refine techniques that predict the fitness and evolutionary success of variant viruses, leading to stronger theoretical foundations for selection of candidate vaccine viruses.
  • The sequence diversity of viral populations within individual hosts is the starting material for selection and subsequent evolution of RNA viruses such as foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Using next-generation sequencing (NGS) performed on a Genome Analyzer platform (Illumina), this study compared the viral populations within two bovine epithelial samples (foot lesions) from a single animal with the Inoculum used to initiate experimental infection. Genomic sequences were determined in duplicate sequencing runs, and the consensus sequence determined by NGS, for the Inoculum, was identical to that previously determined using the Sanger method. However, NGS reveals the fine polymorphic sub-structure of the viral population, from nucleotide variants present at just below 50% frequency to those present at fractions of 1%. Some of the higher frequency polymorphisms identified encoded changes within codons associated with heparan sulphate binding and were present in both feet lesions revealing intermediate stages in the evolution of a tissue-culture adapted virus replicating within a mammalian host. We identified 2,622, 1,434 and 1,703 polymorphisms in the Inoculum, and in the two foot lesions respectively: most of the substitutions occurred only in a small fraction of the population and represent the progeny from recent cellular replication prior to onset of any selective pressures. We estimated an upper limit for the genome-wide mutation rate of the virus within a cell to be 7.8 x 10-4 per nt. The greater depth of detection, achieved by NGS, demonstrates that this method is a powerful and valuable tool for the dissection of FMDV populations within-hosts.