• We present a framework to simultaneously constrain the values and uncertainties of the strength of convective core overshooting, metallicity, extinction, distance, and age in stellar populations. We then apply the framework to archival Hubble Space Telescope observations of six stellar clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud that have reported ages between ~1-2.5 Gyr. Assuming a canonical value of the strength of core convective overshooting, we recover the well-known age-metallicity correlation, and additional correlations between metallicity and extinction and metallicity and distance. If we allow the strength of core overshooting to vary, we find that for intermediate-aged stellar clusters, the measured values of distance and extinction are negligibly effected by uncertainties of core overshooting strength. However, cluster age and metallicity may have disconcertingly large systematic shifts when core overshooting strength is allowed to vary by more than +/- 0.05 Hp. Using the six stellar clusters, we combine their posterior distribution functions to obtain the most probable core overshooting value, 0.500 +0.016 -0.134 Hp, which is in line with canonical values.
  • The analysis of the early star formation history (SFH) of nearby galaxies, obtained from their resolved stellar populations is relevant as a test for cosmological models. However, the early time resolution of observationally derived SFHs is limited by several factors. Thus, direct comparison of observationally derived SFHs with those derived from theoretical models of galaxy formation is potentially biased. Here we investigate and quantify this effect. For this purpose, we analyze the duration of the early star formation activity in a sample of four Local Group dwarf galaxies and test whether they are consistent with being true fossils of the pre-reionization era; i.e., if the quenching of their star formation occurred before cosmic reionization by UV photons was completed. Two classical dSph (Cetus and Tucana) and two dTrans (LGS-3 and Phoenix) isolated galaxies with total stellar masses between $1.3\times 10^6$ to $7.2\times 10^6$ M$_\odot$ have been studied. Accounting for time resolution effects, the SFHs peak as much as 1.25 Gyr earlier than the optimal solutions. Thus, this effect is important for a proper comparison of model and observed SFHs. It is also shown that none of the analyzed galaxies can be considered a true-fossil of the pre-reionization era, although it is possible that the {\it outer regions} of Cetus and Tucana are consistent with quenching by reionization.
  • We use high resolution Hydro$+$N-Body cosmological simulations to compare the assembly and evolution of a small field dwarf (stellar mass ~ 10$^{6-7}$ M$\odot$, total mass 10$^{10}$ M$\odot$ in $\Lambda$ dominated CDM and 2keV WDM cosmologies. We find that star formation (SF) in the WDM model is reduced and delayed by 1-2 Gyr relative to the CDM model, independently of the details of SF and feedback. Independent of the DM model, but proportionally to the SF efficiency, gas outflows lower the central mass density through `dynamical heating', such that all realizations have circular velocities $<$ 20kms at 500$~$pc, in agreement with local kinematic constraints. As a result of dynamical heating, older stars are less centrally concentrated than younger stars, similar to stellar population gradients observed in nearby dwarf galaxies. Introducing an important diagnostic of SF and feedback models, we translate our simulations into artificial color-magnitude diagrams and star formation histories in order to directly compare to available observations. The simulated galaxies formed most of their stars in many $\sim$10 Myr long bursts. The CDM galaxy has a global SFH, HI abundance and Fe/H and alpha-elements distribution well matched to current observations of dwarf galaxies. These results highlight the importance of directly including `baryon physics' in simulations when 1) comparing predictions of galaxy formation models with the kinematics and number density of local dwarf galaxies and 2) differentiating between CDM and non-standard models with different DM or power spectra.
  • The evolution and lifetimes of thermally pulsating asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) stars suffer from significant uncertainties. We present a detailed framework for constraining model luminosity functions of TP-AGB stars using resolved stellar populations. We show an example of this method that compares various TP-AGB mass-loss prescriptions that differ in their treatments of mass loss before the onset of dust-driven winds (pre-dust). We find that models with more efficient pre-dust driven mass loss produce results consistent with observations, as opposed to more canonical mass-loss models. Efficient pre-dust driven mass-loss predicts for [Fe/H] < -1.2, lower mass TP-AGB stars (M < 1 Msun) must have lifetimes less than about 1.2 Myr.
  • The evolution and lifetimes of thermally pulsating asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) stars suffer from significant uncertainties. In this work, we analyze the numbers and luminosity functions of TP-AGB stars in six quiescent, low metallicity ([Fe/H] $\lesssim -0.86$) galaxies taken from the ANGST sample, using HST photometry in both optical and near-infrared filters. The galaxies contain over 1000 TP-AGB stars (at least 60 per field). We compare the observed TP-AGB luminosity functions and relative numbers of TP-AGB and RGB stars, to models generated from different suites of TP-AGB evolutionary tracks after adopting star formation histories (SFH) derived from the HST deep optical observations. We test various mass-loss prescriptions that differ in their treatments of mass-loss before the onset of dust-driven winds (pre-dust). These comparisons confirm that pre-dust mass-loss is important, since models that neglect pre-dust mass-loss fail to explain the observed TP-AGB/RGB ratio or the luminosity functions. In contrast, models with more efficient pre-dust mass-loss produce results consistent with observations. We find that for [Fe/H]$\lesssim-0.86$, lower mass TP-AGB stars ($M\lesssim1M_\odot$) must have lifetimes of $\sim0.5$ Myr and higher masses ($M\lesssim 3M_\odot$) must have lifetimes $\lesssim 1.2$ Myr. In addition, assuming our best-fitting mass-loss prescription, we show that the third dredge up has no significant effect on TP-AGB lifetimes in this mass and metallicity range.
  • We present a spectroscopic study of the four extended star clusters (ESCs) in NGC 6822 based on the data obtained with Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS) on the Gemini-South 8.1m telescope. Their radial velocities derived from the spectra range from $-61.2 \pm 20.4$ km s$^{-1}$ (for C1) to $-115.34 \pm 57.9$ km s$^{-1}$ (for C4) and, unlike the intermediate age carbon stars, they do not display any sign of systematic rotation around NGC 6822. The ages and metallicities derived using the Lick indices show that the ESCs are old ($\geq 8$ Gyr) and metal poor ([Fe/H]$\lesssim -1.5$). NGC 6822 is found to have both metal poor ([Fe/H]$\approx -2.0$) and metal rich ([Fe/H]$\approx -0.9$) star clusters within 15 arcmin (2 kpc) from the center, while only metal poor clusters are observed in the outer halo with $r \geq 20$ arcmin (2.6 kpc). The kinematics, old ages, and low metallicities of ESCs suggest that ESCs may have accreted into the halo of NGC 6822. Based on the velocity distribution of ESCs, we have determined the total mass and the mass-to-light ratio of NGC 6822: $M_{N6822} = 7.5^{+4.5}_{-0.1} \times 10^{9} M_{\odot}$ and $(M/L)_{N6822} = 75^{+45}_{-1} (M/L)_{\odot}$. It shows that NGC 6822 is one of the most dark matter dominated dwarf galaxies in the Local Group.
  • We present an analysis of the star formation history (SFH) of the transition-type (dIrr/dSph) Local Group galaxy \objectname[]{LGS-3} (Pisces) based on deep photometry obtained with the {\it Advanced Camera for Surveys} onboard the {\it Hubble Space Telescope}. Our analysis shows that the SFH of \objectname[]{LGS-3} is dominated by a main episode $\sim 11.7$ Gyr ago with a duration of $\sim$ 1.4 Gyr which formed $\sim 90%$ of the stars. Subsequently, \objectname[]{LGS-3} continued forming stars until the present, although at a much lower rate. The lack of early chemical enrichment is in contrast to that observed in the isolated dSph galaxies of comparable luminosity, implying that the dSphs were more massive and subjected to more tidal stripping. We compare the SFH of \objectname[]{LGS-3} with expectations from cosmological models. Most or all the star formation was produced in \objectname[]{LGS-3} after the reionization epoch, assumed to be completed at $z\sim6$ or $\sim 12.7$ Gyr ago. The total mass of the galaxy is estimated to be between 2 and $4\times 10^8$ M$_\odot$, corresponding to circular velocities between 28 km\ s$^{-1}$ to 36 km\ s$^{-1}$. These values are close to but somewhat above the limit of 30 km\ s$^{-1}$ below which the UV background is expected to prevent any star formation after reionization. Feedback from SNe associated with the initial episode of star formation (mechanical luminosity from SNe $L_w=5.3\times 10^{38}$ erg s$^{-1}$) is probably inadequate to completely blow away the gas. However, the combined effects of SN feedback and UV background heating might be expected to completely halt star formation at the reionization epoch for the low mass of \objectname[]{LGS-3}; this suggests that self-shielding is important to the early evolution of galaxies in this mass range.
  • The starburst phenomenon can shape the evolution of the host galaxy and the surrounding intergalactic medium. The extent of the evolutionary impact is partly determined by the duration of the starburst, which has a direct correlation with both the amount of stellar feedback and the development of galactic winds, particularly for smaller mass dwarf systems. We measure the duration of starbursts in twenty nearby, ongoing, and "fossil" starbursts in dwarf galaxies based on the recent star formation histories derived from resolved stellar population data obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope. Contrary to the shorter times of 3-10 Myr often cited, the starburst durations we measure range from 450 - 650 Myr in fifteen of the dwarf galaxies and up to 1.3 Gyr in four galaxies; these longer durations are comparable to or longer than the dynamical timescales for each system. The same feedback from massive stars that may quench the flickering SF does not disrupt the overall burst event in our sample of galaxies. While five galaxies present fossil bursts, fifteen galaxies show ongoing bursts and thus the final durations may be longer than we report here for these systems. One galaxy shows a burst that has been ongoing for only 20 Myr; we are likely seeing the beginning of a burst event in this system. Using the duration of the starbursts, we calculate that the bursts deposited 10^(53.9)-10^(57.2) ergs of energy into the interstellar medium through stellar winds and supernovae and produced 3%-26% of the host galaxy's mass.
  • We use archival HST observations of resolved stellar populations to derive the star formation histories (SFHs) of 18 nearby starburst dwarf galaxies. In this first paper we present the observations, color-magnitude diagrams, and the SFHs of the 18 starburst galaxies, based on a homogeneous approach to the data reduction, differential extinction, and treatment of photometric completeness. We adopt a star formation rate (SFR) threshold normalized to the average SFR of the individual system as a metric for classifying starbursts in SFHs derived from resolved stellar populations. This choice facilitates finding not only currently bursting galaxies but also "fossil" bursts increasing the sample size of starburst galaxies in the nearby (D<8 Mpc) universe. Thirteen of the eighteen galaxies are experiencing ongoing bursts and five galaxies show fossil bursts. From our reconstructed SFHs, it is evident that the elevated SFRs of a burst are sustained for hundreds of Myr with variations on small timescales. A long >100 Myr temporal baseline is thus fundamental to any starburst definition or identification method. The longer lived bursts rule out rapid "self-quenching" of starbursts on global scales. The bursting galaxies' gas consumption timescales are shorter than the Hubble time for all but one galaxy confirming the short-lived nature of starbursts based on fuel limitations. Additionally, we find the strength of the H{\alpha} emission usually correlates with the CMD based SFR during the last 4-10 Myr. However, in four cases, the H{\alpha} emission is significantly less than what is expected for models of starbursts; the discrepancy is due to the SFR changing on timescales of a few Myr. The inherently short timescale of the H{\alpha} emission limits identifying galaxies as starbursts based on the current characteristics which may or may not be representative of the recent SFH of a galaxy.
  • We present HST/WFPC2 observations across the disk of the nearby isolated dwarf S0 galaxy NGC 404, which hosts an extended gas disk. Our deepest field reaches the red clump and main-sequence stars with ages <500 Myr. Although we detect trace amounts of star formation at times more recent than 10 Gyr for all fields, the proportion of red giant stars to asymptotic giants and main sequence stars suggests that the disk is dominated by an ancient (>10 Gyr) population. Detailed modeling of the color-magnitude diagram suggests that ~70% of the stellar mass in the NGC 404 disk formed by z~2 (10 Gyr ago) and at least ~90% formed prior to z~1 (8 Gyr ago). These results indicate that the stellar populations of the NGC 404 disk are on average significantly older than those of other nearby disk galaxies, suggesting that early and late type disks may have different long-term evolutionary histories, not simply differences in their recent star formation rates. Comparisons of the spatial distribution of the young stellar mass and FUV emission in GALEX images show that the brightest FUV regions contain the youngest stars, but that some young stars (<160 Myr) lie outside of these regions. FUV luminosity appears to be strongly affected by both age and stellar mass within individual regions. Finally, we use our measurements to infer the relationship between the star formation rate and the gas density of the disk at previous epochs. We find that most of the history of the NGC 404 disk is consistent with star formation that has decreased with the gas density according to the Schmidt law. However, 0.5-1 Gyr ago, the star formation rate was unusually low for the inferred gas density, consistent with the possibility that there was a gas accretion event that reignited star formation ~0.5 Gyr ago. Such an event could explain why this S0 galaxy hosts an extended gas disk.
  • We present new Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of NGC 300 taken as part of the ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury (ANGST). Individual stars are resolved in these images down to an absolute magnitude of M_F814W = 1.0 (below the red clump). We determine the star formation history of the galaxy in 6 radial bins by comparing our observed color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) with synthetic CMDs based on theoretical isochrones. We find that the stellar disk out to 5.4 kpc is primarily old, in contrast with the outwardly similar galaxy M33. We determine the scale length as a function of age and find evidence for inside-out growth of the stellar disk: the scale length has increased from 1.1 +/- 0.1 kpc 10 Gyr ago to 1.3 +/- 0.1 kpc at present, indicating a buildup in the fraction of young stars at larger radii. As the scale length of M33 has recently been shown to have increased much more dramatically with time, our results demonstrate that two galaxies with similar sizes and morphologies can have very different histories. With an N-body simulation of a galaxy designed to be similar to NGC 300, we determine that the effects of radial migration should be minimal. We trace the metallicity gradient as a function of time and find a present day metallicity gradient consistent with that seen in previous studies. Consistent results are obtained from archival images covering the same radial extent but differing in placement and filter combination.
  • We present resolved stellar photometry of NGC 2976 obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) as part of the ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury (ANGST) program. The data cover the radial extent of the major axis of the disk out to 6 kpc, or ~6 scale lengths. The outer disk was imaged to a depth of M_F606W ~ 1, and an inner field was imaged to the crowding limit at a depth of M_F606W ~ -1. Through detailed analysis and modeling of these CMDs we have reconstructed the star formation history of the stellar populations currently residing in these portions of the galaxy, finding similar ancient populations at all radii but significantly different young populations at increasing radii. In particular, outside of the well-measured break in the disk surface brightness profile, the age of the youngest population increases with distance from the galaxy center, suggesting that star formation is shutting down from the outside-in. We use our measured star formation history, along with H I surface density measurements, to reconstruct the surface density profile of the disk during previous epochs. Comparisons between the recovered star formation rates and reconstructed gas densities at previous epochs are consistent with star formation following the Schmidt law during the past 0.5 Gyrs, but with a drop in star formation efficiency at low gas densities, as seen in local galaxies at the present day. The current rate and gas density suggest that rapid star formation in NGC 2976 is currently in the process of ceasing from the outside-in due to gas depletion. This process of outer disk gas depletion and inner disk star formation was likely triggered by an interaction with the core of the M81 group >~1 Gyr ago that stripped the gas from the galaxy halo and/or triggered gas inflow from the outer disk toward the galaxy center.
  • (abridged) Using a complete sample of ~300 star-forming galaxies within 11 Mpc, we evaluate the consistency between star formation rates (SFRs) inferred from the far ultraviolet (FUV) non-ionizing continuum and H-alpha nebular emission, assuming standard conversion recipes in which the SFR scales linearly with luminosity at a given wavelength. Our analysis probes SFRs over 5 orders of magnitude, down to ultra-low activities on the order of ~0.0001 M_sun/yr. The data are drawn from the 11 Mpc H-alpha and Ultraviolet Galaxy Survey (11HUGS), which has obtained H-alpha fluxes from ground-based narrowband imaging, and UV fluxes from imaging with GALEX. For normal spiral galaxies (SFR~1 M_sun/yr), our results are consistent with previous work which has shown that FUV SFRs tend to be lower than H-alpha SFRs before accounting for internal dust attenuation, but that there is relative consistency between the two tracers after proper corrections are applied. However, a puzzle is encountered at the faint end of the luminosity function. As lower luminosity dwarf galaxies, roughly less active than the Small Magellanic Cloud, are examined, H-alpha tends to increasingly under-predict the SFR relative to the FUV. Although past studies have suggested similar trends, this is the first time this effect is probed with a statistical sample for galaxies with SFR~<0.1 M_sun/yr. A range of standard explanations does not appear to be able to account for the magnitude of the systematic. Some recent work has argued for an IMF which is deficient in high mass stars in dwarf and low surface brightness galaxies, and we also consider this scenario.
  • The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury (ANGST) is a systematic survey to establish a legacy of uniform multi-color photometry of resolved stars for a volume-limited sample of nearby galaxies (D<4 Mpc). The survey volume encompasses 69 galaxies in diverse environments, including close pairs, small & large groups, filaments, and truly isolated regions. The galaxies include a nearly complete range of morphological types spanning a factor of ~10^4 in luminosity and star formation rate. The survey data consists of images taken with ACS on HST, supplemented with archival data and new WFPC2 imaging taken after the failure of ACS. Survey images include wide field tilings covering the full radial extent of each galaxy, and single deep pointings in uncrowded regions of the most massive galaxies in the volume. The new wide field imaging in ANGST reaches median 50% completenesses of m_F475W=28.0 mag, m_F606W=27.3 mag, and m_F814W=27.3 mag, several magnitudes below the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB). The deep fields reach magnitudes sufficient to fully resolve the structure in the red clump. The resulting photometric catalogs are publicly accessible and contain over 34 million photometric measurements of >14 million stars. In this paper we present the details of the sample selection, imaging, data reduction, and the resulting photometric catalogs, along with an analysis of the photometric uncertainties (systematic and random), for both the ACS and WFPC2 imaging. We also present uniformly derived relative distances measured from the apparent magnitude of the TRGB.
  • The duration of a starburst is a fundamental parameter affecting the evolution of galaxies yet, to date, observational constraints on the durations of starbursts are not well established. Here we study the recent star formation histories (SFHs) of three nearby dwarf galaxies to rigorously quantify the duration of their starburst events using a uniform and consistent approach. We find that the bursts range from ~200 - ~400 Myr in duration resolving the tension between the shorter timescales often derived observationally with the longer timescales derived from dynamical arguments. If these three starbursts are typical of starbursts in dwarf galaxies, then the short timescales (3 - 10 Myr) associated with starbursts in previous studies are best understood as "flickering" events which are simply small components of the larger starburst. In this sample of three nearby dwarfs, the bursts are not localized events. All three systems show bursting levels of star formation in regions of both high and low stellar density. The enhanced star formation moves around the galaxy during the bursts and covers a large fraction of the area of the galaxy. These massive, long duration bursts can significantly affect the structure, dynamics, and chemical evolution of the host galaxy and can be the progenitors of "superwinds" that drive much of the recently chemically enriched material from the galaxy into the intergalactic medium.
  • The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury (ANGST) is a large Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) treasury program to obtain resolved stellar photometry for a volume-limited sample of galaxies out to 4 Mpc. As part of this program, we have obtained deep ACS imaging of a field in the outer disk of the large spiral galaxy M81. The field contains the outskirts of a spiral arm as well as an area containing no current star formation. Our imaging results in a color-magnitude diagram (CMD) reaching to F814W = 28.8 and F606W = 29.5, one magnitude fainter than the red clump. Through detailed modeling of the full CMD, we quantify the age and metallicity distribution of the stellar populations contained in the field. The mean metallicity in the field is -1<[M/H]<0 and only a small fraction of stars have ages <~1 Gyr. The results show that most of the stars in this outer disk field were formed by z~1 and that the arm structure at this radius has a lifetime of >~100 Myr. We discuss the measured evolution of the M81 disk in the context of surveys of high-redshift disk galaxies and deep stellar photometry of other nearby galaxies. All of these indicate that massive spiral disks are mostly formed by z~1 and that they have experienced rapid metal enrichment.
  • We have obtained resolved stellar photometry from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) observations of a field in the outer disk of M81 as part of the ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury (ANGST). Motivated by the recent discovery of extended UV (XUV) disks around many nearby spiral galaxies, we use the observed stellar population to derive the recent star formation histories of five ~0.5 kpc-sized regions within this field. These regions were selected on the basis of their UV luminosity from GALEX and include two HII regions, two regions which are UV-bright but Halpha-faint, and one "control" region faint in both UV and Halpha. We estimate our effective SFR detection limit at ~2 x 10^-4 Msun/yr, which is lower than that of GALEX for regions of this size. As expected, the HII regions contain massive main sequence stars (in the mass range 18-27 Msun, based on our best extinction estimates), while similar massive main sequence stars are lacking in the UV-bright/Halpha-faint regions. The observations are consistent with stellar ages <10 Myr in the HII regions, and >16 Myr in the UV-bright/Halpha-faint regions. All regions but the control have formed ~10^4 Msun of stars over the past ~65 Myr. Thus, our results, for at least one small area in the outer disk of M81, are consistent with an age difference being sufficient to explain the observed discrepancy between star-forming regions detected in Halpha and those detected exclusively in UV. However, our data cannot conclusively rule out other explanations, such as a strongly truncated initial mass function (IMF).