• Aims. We present the B-, V- and K-band surface photometry catalogs obtained running the automatic software GASPHOT on galaxies from the WINGS cluster survey having isophotal area larger than 200 pixels. The catalogs can be downloaded at the Centre de Donnees Astronomiques de Strasbourg (CDS). Methods. We outline the GASPHOT performances and compare our surface photometry with that obtained by SExtractor, GALFIT and GIM2D. This analysis is aimed at providing statistical information about the accuracy generally achieved by the softwares for automatic surface photometry of galaxies. Results. For each galaxy and for each photometric band the GASPHOT catalogs provide the parameters of the Sersic law best-fitting the luminosity profiles. They are: the sky coordinates of the galaxy center (R:A:; DEC:), the total magnitude (m), the semi-major axis of the effective isophote (Re), the Sersic index (n), the axis ratio (b=a) and a flag parameter (QFLAG) giving a global indication of the fit quality. The WINGS-GASPHOT database includes 41,463 galaxies in the B-band, 42,275 in the V-band, and 71,687 in the K-band. We find that the bright early-type galaxies have larger Sersic indices and effective radii, as well as redder colors in their center. In general the effective radii increase systematically from the K- to the V- and B-band. Conclusions. The GASPHOT photometry turns out to be in fairly good agreement with the surface photometry obtained by GALFIT and GIM2D, as well as with the aperture photometry provided by SExtractor. The main advantages of GASPHOT with respect to other tools are: (i) the automatic finding of the local PSF; (ii) the short CPU time of execution; (iii) the remarkable stability against the choice of the initial guess parameters. All these characteristics make GASPHOT an ideal tool for blind surface photometry of large galaxy samples in wide-field CCD mosaics.
  • We present a study of galaxy sizes in the local Universe as a function of galaxy environment, comparing clusters and the general field. Galaxies with radii and masses comparable to high-z massive and compact galaxies represent 4.4% of all galaxies more massive than 3 X 10^{10} M_sun in the field. Such galaxies are 3 times more frequent in clusters than in the field. Most of them are early-type galaxies with intermediate to old stellar populations. There is a trend of smaller radii for older luminosity-weighted ages at fixed galaxy mass. We show the relation between size and luminosity-weighted age for galaxies of different stellar masses and in different environments. We compare with high-z data to quantify the evolution of galaxy sizes. We find that, once the progenitor bias due to the relation between galaxy size and stellar age is removed, the average amount of size evolution of individual galaxies between high- and low-z is mild, of the order of a factor 1.6.
  • We search for massive and compact galaxies (superdense galaxies, hereafter SDGs) at z=0.03-0.11 in the Padova-Millennium Galaxy and Group Catalogue, a spectroscopically complete sample representative of the local Universe general field population. We find that compact galaxies with radii and mass densities comparable to high-z massive and passive galaxies represent 4.4% of all galaxies with stellar masses above 3 X 10^10 M_sun, yielding a number density of 4.3 X 10^-4 h^3 Mpc^-3. Most of them are S0s (70%) or ellipticals (23%), are red and have intermediate-to-old stellar populations, with a median luminosity-weighted age of 5.4 Gyr and a median mass-weighted age of 9.2 Gyr. Their velocity dispersions and dynamical masses are consistent with the small radii and high stellar mass estimates. Comparing with the WINGS sample of cluster galaxies at similar redshifts, the fraction of superdense galaxies is three times smaller in the field than in clusters, and cluster SDGs are on average 4 Gyr older than field SDGs. We confirm the existence of a universal trend of smaller radii for older luminosity-weighted ages at fixed galaxy mass. On top of the well known dependence of stellar age on galaxy mass, the luminosity-weighted age of galaxies depends on galaxy compactness at fixed mass, and, for a fixed mass and radius, on environment. This effect needs to be taken into account in order not to overestimate the evolution of galaxy sizes from high- to low-z. Our results and hierarchical simulations suggest that a significant fraction of the massive compact galaxies at high-z have evolved into compact galaxies in galaxy clusters today. When stellar age and environmental effects are taken into account, the average amount of size evolution of individual galaxies between high- and low-z is mild, a factor ~1.6. (abridged)
  • The observed relationship between stellar mass and effective radius for early type galaxies, pointed out by many authors, is interpreted in the context of Clausius' virial maximum theory. In this view, it is strongly underlined that the key of the above mentioned correlation is owing to the presence of a deep link between cosmology and the existence of the galaxy Fundamental Plane. Then the ultimate meaning is: understanding visible mass - size correlation and/or Fundamental Plane means understanding how galaxies form. The mass - size relationship involves baryon (mainly stellar) mass and its typical dimension related to the light, but it gets memory of the cosmological mass variance at the equivalence epoch. The reason is that the baryonic component virializes by sharing virial energy in about equal amount between baryons and dark matter, this sharing depending, in turn, on the steepness of the dark matter distribution. The general strategy consists in using the two-component tensor virial theorem for determining the virialized baryonic configurations. A King and a Zhao density profile are assumed for the inner baryonic and the outer dark matter component, respectively, at the end of the relaxation phase. All the considerations are restricted to spherical symmetry for simplicity. The effect of changing the dark-to-baryon mass ratio, m, is investigated inside a LambdaCDM scenario. A theoretical mass - size relation is expressed for the baryonic component, which fits fairly well to the data from a recently studied galaxy sample. Finally, the play of intrinsic dispersion on the mass ratio, m, is discussed in the light of the cusp/core problem and some consequences are speculated about the existence of a limit, m_l, expected by the theory.
  • The theory of the Clausius' virial maximum to explain the Fundamental Plane (FP) proposed by Secco (2000, 2001,2005) is based on the existence of a maximum in the Clausius' Virial (CV) potential energy of a early type galaxy (ETG) stellar component when it is completely embedded inside a dark matter (DM) halo. At the first order approximation the theory was developed by modeling the two-components with two cored power-law density profiles. An higher level of approximation is now taken into account by developing the same theory when the stellar component is modeled by a King-model with a cut-off. Even if the DM halo density remains a cored power law the inner component is now more realistic for the ETGs. The new formulation allows us to understand more deeply what is the dynamical reason of the FP tilt and in general how the CV theory may really be the engine to produce the FP main features. The degeneracy of FP in respect to the initial density perturbation spectrum may be now full understood in a CDM cosmological scenario. A possible way to compare the FPs predicted by the theory with those obtained by observations is also exemplified.