• We develop a nested EM routine for latent class models with covariates which allows maximization of the full-model log-likelihood and, differently from current methods, guarantees monotone log-likelihood sequences along with improved convergence rates.
  • There is wide interest in studying how the distribution of a continuous response changes with a predictor. We are motivated by environmental applications in which the predictor is the dose of an exposure and the response is a health outcome. A main focus in these studies is inference on dose levels associated with a given increase in risk relative to a baseline. Popular methods either dichotomize the continuous response or focus on modeling changes with the dose in the expectation of the outcome. Such choices may lead to information loss and provide inaccurate inference on dose-response relationships. We instead propose a Bayesian convex mixture regression model that allows the entire distribution of the health outcome to be unknown and changing with the dose. To balance flexibility and parsimony, we rely on a mixture model for the density at the extreme doses, and express the conditional density at each intermediate dose via a convex combination of these extremal densities. This representation generalizes classical dose-response models for quantitative outcomes, and provides a more parsimonious, but still powerful, formulation compared to nonparametric methods, thereby improving interpretability and efficiency in inference on risk functions. A Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm for posterior inference is developed, and the benefits of our methods are outlined in simulations, along with a study on the impact of DDT exposure on gestational age.
  • Regression models for dichotomous data are ubiquitous in statistics. Besides being fundamental for inference on binary responses, such representations additionally provide an essential building-block in more complex formulations, such as predictor-dependent mixture models, deep neural networks, graphical models, and others. Within a Bayesian framework, inference typically proceeds by updating the Gaussian priors for the regression coefficients with the likelihood induced by a probit or logit model for the observed binary response data. The apparent absence of conjugacy in this Bayesian updating has motivated a wide variety of computational methods, including Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) routines and algorithms for approximating the posterior distribution. Although such methods are routinely implemented, data augmentation MCMC faces convergence and mixing issues in imbalanced data settings and in hierarchical models, whereas approximate routines fail to capture the skewness and the heavy tails typically observed in the posterior distribution of the coefficients. This article shows that the posterior for the coefficients of a probit model is indeed analytically available---under Gaussian priors---and coincides with a unified skew-normal. Due to this, it is possible to study explicitly the posterior distribution along with the predictive probability mass function of the responses, and to derive a novel and more efficient sampler for high-dimensional inference. A conjugate class of priors for Bayesian probit regression, improving flexibility in prior specification without affecting tractability in posterior inference, is also provided.
  • There is an increasing interest in learning how the distribution of a response variable changes with a set of predictors. Bayesian nonparametric dependent mixture models provide a useful approach to flexibly address this goal. However, many formulations are characterized by difficult interpretation and intractable computational methods. Motivated by these issues, we define a class of predictor-dependent infinite mixture models, which relies on a formal representation of the stick-breaking construction via a continuation-ratio logistic regression, within an exponential family representation. This formulation maintains the same desirable properties of popular predictor-dependent stick-breaking priors, but leverages a recent Polya-Gamma data augmentation to facilitate tractable inference under a broader variety of routine-use computational methods. These methods include Markov Chain Monte Carlo via Gibbs sampling, Expectation Maximization algorithms, and a variational Bayes routine for scalable inference. The algorithms associated with these methods are tested in a toxicology study.
  • Multivariate categorical data are common in many fields. We are motivated by election polls studies assessing evidence of changes in voters opinions with their candidates preferences in the 2016 United States Presidential primaries or caucuses. Similar goals arise routinely in several applications, but current literature lacks a general methodology which combines flexibility, efficiency, and tractability in testing for group differences in multivariate categorical data at different---potentially complex---scales. We address this goal by leveraging a Bayesian representation which factorizes the joint probability mass function for the group variable and the multivariate categorical data as the product of the marginal probabilities for the groups, and the conditional probability mass function of the multivariate categorical data, given the group membership. To enhance flexibility, we define the conditional probability mass function of the multivariate categorical data via a group-dependent mixture of tensor factorizations, thus facilitating dimensionality reduction and borrowing of information, while providing tractable procedures for computation, and accurate tests assessing global and local group differences. We compare our methods with popular competitors, and discuss improved performance in simulations and in American election polls studies.
  • Family planning has been characterized by highly different strategic programs in India, including method-specific contraceptive targets, coercive sterilization, and more recent target-free approaches. These major changes in family planning policies over time have motivated a considerable interest towards assessing the effectiveness of the different programs, while understanding which subsets of the population have not been properly addressed. Current studies consider specific aspects of the above policies, including, for example, the factors associated with the choice of alternative contraceptive methods other than sterilization, for women using contraceptives. Although these analyses produce relevant insights, they fail to provide a global overview of the different family planning policies, and the determinants underlying the contraceptive choices. Motivated by this consideration, we propose a Bayesian semiparametric model relying on a reparameterization of the multinomial probability mass function via a set of conditional Bernoulli choices. The sequential binary structure is defined to be consistent with the current family planning policies in India, and coherent with a reasonable process characterizing the contraceptive choices. This combination of flexible representations and careful reparameterizations allows a broader and interpretable overview of the different policies and contraceptive preferences in India, within a single model.
  • There is increasing interest in learning how human brain networks vary as a function of a continuous trait, but flexible and efficient procedures to accomplish this goal are limited. We develop a Bayesian semiparametric model, which combines low-rank factorizations and flexible Gaussian process priors to learn changes in the conditional expectation of a network-valued random variable across the values of a continuous predictor, while including subject-specific random effects. The formulation leads to a general framework for inference on changes in brain network structures across human traits, facilitating borrowing of information and coherently characterizing uncertainty. We provide an efficient Gibbs sampler for posterior computation along with simple procedures for inference, prediction and goodness-of-fit assessments. The model is applied to learn how human brain networks vary across individuals with different intelligence scores. Results provide interesting insights on the association between intelligence and brain connectivity, while demonstrating good predictive performance.
  • A plethora of networks is being collected in a growing number of fields, including disease transmission, international relations, social interactions, and others. As data streams continue to grow, the complexity associated with these highly multidimensional connectivity data presents novel challenges. In this paper, we focus on the time-varying interconnections among a set of actors in multiple contexts, called layers. Current literature lacks flexible statistical models for dynamic multilayer networks, which can enhance quality in inference and prediction by efficiently borrowing information within each network, across time, and between layers. Motivated by this gap, we develop a Bayesian nonparametric model leveraging latent space representations. Our formulation characterizes the edge probabilities as a function of shared and layer-specific actors positions in a latent space, with these positions changing in time via Gaussian processes. This representation facilitates dimensionality reduction and incorporates different sources of information in the observed data. In addition, we obtain tractable procedures for posterior computation, inference, and prediction. We provide theoretical results on the flexibility of our model. Our methods are tested on simulations and infection studies monitoring dynamic face-to-face contacts among individuals in multiple days, where we perform better than current methods in inference and prediction.
  • Adaptive dimensionality reduction in high-dimensional problems is a key topic in statistics. The multiplicative gamma process takes a relevant step in this direction, but improved studies on its properties are required to ease implementation. This note addresses such aim.
  • Our focus is on realistically modeling and forecasting dynamic networks of face-to-face contacts among individuals. Important aspects of such data that lead to problems with current methods include the tendency of the contacts to move between periods of slow and rapid changes, and the dynamic heterogeneity in the actors' connectivity behaviors. Motivated by this application, we develop a novel method for Locally Adaptive DYnamic (LADY) network inference. The proposed model relies on a dynamic latent space representation in which each actor's position evolves in time via stochastic differential equations. Using a state space representation for these stochastic processes and P\'olya-gamma data augmentation, we develop an efficient MCMC algorithm for posterior inference along with tractable procedures for online updating and forecasting of future networks. We evaluate performance in simulation studies, and consider an application to face-to-face contacts among individuals in a primary school.
  • Network data are increasingly collected along with other variables of interest. Our motivation is drawn from neurophysiology studies measuring brain connectivity networks for a sample of individuals along with their membership to a low or high creative reasoning group. It is of paramount importance to develop statistical methods for testing of global and local changes in the structural interconnections among brain regions across groups. We develop a general Bayesian procedure for inference and testing of group differences in the network structure, which relies on a nonparametric representation for the conditional probability mass function associated with a network-valued random variable. By leveraging a mixture of low-rank factorizations, we allow simple global and local hypothesis testing adjusting for multiplicity. An efficient Gibbs sampler is defined for posterior computation. We provide theoretical results on the flexibility of the model and assess testing performance in simulations. The approach is applied to provide novel insights on the relationships between human brain networks and creativity.
  • Replicated network data are increasingly available in many research fields. In connectomic applications, inter-connections among brain regions are collected for each patient under study, motivating statistical models which can flexibly characterize the probabilistic generative mechanism underlying these network-valued data. Available models for a single network are not designed specifically for inference on the entire probability mass function of a network-valued random variable and therefore lack flexibility in characterizing the distribution of relevant topological structures. We propose a flexible Bayesian nonparametric approach for modeling the population distribution of network-valued data. The joint distribution of the edges is defined via a mixture model which reduces dimensionality and efficiently incorporates network information within each mixture component by leveraging latent space representations. The formulation leads to an efficient Gibbs sampler and provides simple and coherent strategies for inference and goodness-of-fit assessments. We provide theoretical results on the flexibility of our model and illustrate improved performance --- compared to state-of-the-art models --- in simulations and application to human brain networks.
  • Complex network data problems are increasingly common in many fields of application. Our motivation is drawn from strategic marketing studies monitoring customer choices of specific products, along with co-subscription networks encoding multiple purchasing behavior. Data are available for several agencies within the same insurance company, and our goal is to efficiently exploit co-subscription networks to inform targeted advertising of cross-sell strategies to currently mono-product customers. We address this goal by developing a Bayesian hierarchical model, which clusters agencies according to common mono-product customer choices and co-subscription networks. Within each cluster, we efficiently model customer behavior via a cluster-dependent mixture of latent eigenmodels. This formulation provides key information on mono-product customer choices and multiple purchasing behavior within each cluster, informing targeted cross-sell strategies. We develop simple algorithms for tractable inference, and assess performance in simulations and an application to business intelligence.
  • There is growing interest in understanding how the structural interconnections among brain regions change with the occurrence of neurological diseases. Diffusion weighted MRI imaging has allowed researchers to non-invasively estimate a network of structural cortical connections made by white matter tracts, but current statistical methods for relating such networks to the presence or absence of a disease cannot exploit this rich network information. Standard practice considers each edge independently or summarizes the network with a few simple features. We enable dramatic gains in biological insight via a novel unifying methodology for inference on brain network variations associated to the occurrence of neurological diseases. The key of this approach is to define a probabilistic generative mechanism directly on the space of network configurations via dependent mixtures of low-rank factorizations, which efficiently exploit network information and allow the probability mass function for the brain network-valued random variable to vary flexibly across the group of patients characterized by a specific neurological disease and the one comprising age-matched cognitively healthy individuals.
  • We have hiked many miles alongside several professors as we traversed our statistical path -- a regime switching trail which changed direction following a class on the foundations of our discipline. As we play the game of research in that limbo between student and academic, one thing among Prof. Bernardi's teachings has never been more clear: to draw a route in the research map you not only need to know your destination, but you must also understand where you are and how you arrived there.
  • We propose a Bayesian nonparametric model including time-varying predictors in dynamic network inference. The model is applied to infer the dependence structure among financial markets during the global financial crisis, estimating effects of verbal and material cooperation efforts. We interestingly learn contagion effects, with increasing influence of verbal relations during the financial crisis and opposite results during the United States housing bubble.
  • Symmetric binary matrices representing relations among entities are commonly collected in many areas. Our focus is on dynamically evolving binary relational matrices, with interest being in inference on the relationship structure and prediction. We propose a nonparametric Bayesian dynamic model, which reduces dimensionality in characterizing the binary matrix through a lower-dimensional latent space representation, with the latent coordinates evolving in continuous time via Gaussian processes. By using a logistic mapping function from the probability matrix space to the latent relational space, we obtain a flexible and computational tractable formulation. Employing P\`olya-Gamma data augmentation, an efficient Gibbs sampler is developed for posterior computation, with the dimension of the latent space automatically inferred. We provide some theoretical results on flexibility of the model, and illustrate performance via simulation experiments. We also consider an application to co-movements in world financial markets.
  • In modeling multivariate time series, it is important to allow time-varying smoothness in the mean and covariance process. In particular, there may be certain time intervals exhibiting rapid changes and others in which changes are slow. If such time-varying smoothness is not accounted for, one can obtain misleading inferences and predictions, with over-smoothing across erratic time intervals and under-smoothing across times exhibiting slow variation. This can lead to mis-calibration of predictive intervals, which can be substantially too narrow or wide depending on the time. We propose a locally adaptive factor process for characterizing multivariate mean-covariance changes in continuous time, allowing locally varying smoothness in both the mean and covariance matrix. This process is constructed utilizing latent dictionary functions evolving in time through nested Gaussian processes and linearly related to the observed data with a sparse mapping. Using a differential equation representation, we bypass usual computational bottlenecks in obtaining MCMC and online algorithms for approximate Bayesian inference. The performance is assessed in simulations and illustrated in a financial application.