• The analysis of Proxima Centauri's radial velocities recently led Anglada-Escud\'e et al. (2016) to claim the presence of a low mass planet orbiting the Sun's nearest star once every 11.2 days. Although the a-priori probability that Proxima b transits its parent star is just 1.5%, the potential impact of such a discovery would be considerable. Independent of recent radial velocity efforts, we observed Proxima Centauri for 12.5 days in 2014 and 31 days in 2015 with the MOST space telescope. We report here that we cannot make a compelling case that Proxima b transits in our precise photometric time series. Imposing an informative prior on the period and phase, we do detect a candidate signal with the expected depth. However, perturbing the phase prior across 100 evenly spaced intervals reveals one strong false-positive and one weaker instance. We estimate a false-positive rate of at least a few percent and a much higher false-negative rate of 20-40%, likely caused by the very high flare rate of Proxima Centauri. Comparing our candidate signal to HATSouth ground-based photometry reveals that the signal is somewhat, but not conclusively, disfavored (1-2 sigmas) leading us to argue that the signal is most likely spurious. We expect that infrared photometric follow-up could more conclusively test the existence of this candidate signal, owing to the suppression of flare activity and the impressive infrared brightness of the parent star.
  • Results of the time variability monitoring of the two classical T Tauri stars, RU Lup and IM Lup, are presented. Three photometric data sets were utilised: (1) simultaneous (same field) MOST satellite observations over four weeks in each of the years 2012 and 2013, (2) multicolour observations at the SAAO in April - May of 2013, (3) archival V-filter ASAS data for nine seasons, 2001 - 2009. They were augmented by an analysis of high-resolution, public-domain VLT-UT2 UVES spectra from the years 2000 to 2012. From the MOST observations, we infer that irregular light variations of RU Lup are caused by stochastic variability of hot spots induced by unstable accretion. In contrast, the MOST light curves of IM Lup are fairly regular and modulated with a period of about 7.19 - 7.58 d, which is in accord with ASAS observations showing a well defined 7.247+/-0.026 d periodicity. We propose that this is the rotational period of IM Lup and is due to the changing visibility of two antipodal hot spots created near the stellar magnetic poles during the stable process of accretion. Re-analysis of RU Lup high-resolution spectra with the Broadening Function approach reveals signs of a large polar cold spot, which is fairly stable over 13 years. As the star rotates, the spot-induced depression of intensity in the Broadening Function profiles changes cyclically with period 3.71058 d, which was previously found by the spectral cross-correlation method.
  • We report the first planet discovery from the two-wheeled Kepler (K2) mission: HIP 116454 b. The host star HIP 116454 is a bright (V = 10.1, K = 8.0) K1-dwarf with high proper motion, and a parallax-based distance of 55.2 +/- 5.4 pc. Based on high-resolution optical spectroscopy, we find that the host star is metal-poor with [Fe/H] = -.16 +/- .18, and has a radius R = 0.716 +/- .0024 R_sun and mass M = .775 +/- .027 Msun. The star was observed by the Kepler spacecraft during its Two-Wheeled Concept Engineering Test in February 2014. During the 9 days of observations, K2 observed a single transit event. Using a new K2 photometric analysis technique we are able to correct small telescope drifts and recover the observed transit at high confidence, corresponding to a planetary radius of Rp = 2.53 +/- 0.18 Rearth. Radial velocity observations with the HARPS-N spectrograph reveal a 11.82 +/- 1.33 Mearth planet in a 9.1 day orbit, consistent with the transit depth, duration, and ephemeris. Follow-up photometric measurements from the MOST satellite confirm the transit observed in the K2 photometry and provide a refined ephemeris, making HIP 116454 b amenable for future follow-up observations of this latest addition to the growing population of transiting super-Earths around nearby, bright stars.
  • We present an analysis of the 2011 photometric observations of TW Hya by the MOST satellite; this is the fourth continuous series of this type. The large-scale light variations are dominated by a strong, quasi-periodic 4.18 d oscillation with superimposed, apparently chaotic flaring activity; the former is most likely produced by stellar rotation with one large hot spot created by a stable accretion funnel in the stable regime of accretion while the latter may be produced by small hot spots, created at moderate latitudes by unstable accretion tongues. A new, previously unnoticed feature is a series of semi-periodic, well defined brightness dips of unknown nature of which 19 were observed during 43 days of our nearly-continuous observations. Re-analysis of the 2009 MOST light curve revealed the presence of 3 similar dips. On the basis of recent theoretical results, we tentatively conclude that the dips may represent occultations of the small hot spots created by unstable accretion tongues by hypothetical optically thick clumps.
  • Through photometric monitoring of the extended transit window of HD 97658b with the MOST space telescope, we have found that this exoplanet transits with an ephemeris consistent with that predicted from radial velocity measurements. The mid-transit times are $5.6\sigma$ earlier than those of the unverified transit-like signals reported in 2011, and we find no connection between the two sets of events. The transit depth together with our determined stellar radius ($R_\star = 0.703^{+0.039}_{-0.034} R_\odot$) indicates a 2.34$^{+0.18}_{-0.15}$ $R_{\oplus}$ super-Earth. When combined with the radial velocity determined mass of 7.86 $\pm 0.73$ $M_{\oplus}$, our radius measure allows us to derive a planet density of 3.44$^{+0.91}_{-0.82}$ g cm$^{-3}$. Models suggest that a planet with our measured density has a rocky core that is enveloped in an atmosphere composed of lighter elements. The star of the HD 97658 system is the second brightest known to host a transiting super-Earth, facilitating follow-up studies of this not easily daunted, warm and likely volatile-rich exoplanet.
  • We study 23 previously published Kepler targets to perform a consistent grid-based Bayesian asteroseismic analysis and compare our results to those obtained via the Asteroseismic Modelling Portal (AMP). We find differences in the derived stellar parameters of many targets and their uncertainties. While some of these differences can be attributed to systematic effects between stellar evolutionary models, we show that the different methodologies deliver incompatible uncertainties for some parameters. Using non-adiabatic models and our capability to measure surface effects, we also investigate the dependency of these surface effects on the stellar parameters. Our results suggest a dependence of the magnitude of the surface effect on the mixing length parameter which also, but only minimally, affects the determination of stellar parameters. While some stars in our sample show no surface effect at all, the most significant surface effects are found for stars that are close to the Sun's position in the HR diagram.
  • We perform a Bayesian grid-based analysis of the solar l=0,1,2 and 3 p modes obtained via BiSON in order to deliver the first Bayesian asteroseismic analysis of the solar composition problem. We do not find decisive evidence to prefer either of the contending chemical compositions, although the revised solar abundances (AGSS09) are more probable in general. We do find indications for systematic problems in standard stellar evolution models, unrelated to the consequences of inadequate modelling of the outer layers on the higher-order modes. The seismic observables are best fit by solar models that are several hundred million years older than the meteoritic age of the Sun. Similarly, meteoritic age calibrated models do not adequately reproduce the observed seismic observables. Our results suggest that these problems will affect any asteroseismic inference that relies on a calibration to the Sun.
  • Photometric observations obtained by the MOST satellite were used to characterize optical small scale variability of the young stars FU Ori and Z CMa. Wavelet analysis for FU Ori reveals the possible existence of several 2-9 d quasi-periodic features occurring nearly simultaneously; they may be interpreted as plasma parcels or other localized disc heterogeneities revolving at different Keplerian radii in the accretion disc. Their periods may shorten slowly which may be due to spiralling in of individual parcels toward the inner disc radius, estimated at 4.8+/-0.2 R_sun. Analysis of additional multicolour data confirms the previously obtained relation between variations in the B-V colour index and the V magnitude. In contrast to the FU Ori results, the oscillation spectrum of Z CMa does not reveal any periodicities with the wavelet spectrum possibly dominated by outburst of the Herbig Be component.
  • The GJ 581 system has been amply studied since its discovery in 2005: the number of known planets in the system has increased and their orbital parameters are among the most precisely determined for radial velocity detected exoplanets. We have acquired MOST space-based photometry during 2007 and 2009, with the aims of measuring the stellar variability and searching for transits of GJ 581e, respectively. We quantify our sensitivity to shallow transit signals using Monte Carlo simulations, and perform a transit search within the 3$\sigma$ transit windows corresponding to both the circular and Keplerian orbit ephemerides. Our analysis rules out transits for a planet with an orbital period of 3.15 days (GJ 581 e) having a radius larger than 1.62 $R_{\oplus}$ (or a density lower than 2.39 g cm$^{-3}$ for an orbital inclination of 90$^{\circ}$) to 2$\sigma$ confidence. Thus, if the planet transits, we can exclude hydrogen, helium and water theoretical model compositions. The MOST photometry also allows us to rule out transits of GJ 581b within the Keplerian orbit-derived transit window for impact parameter values smaller than $\sim$0.4 and confirm previous results which exclude transits for this planet within the circular orbit-derived transit window, for all plausible interior compositions. We find that the stellar brightness of GJ 581 is stable to within 1%, a characteristic which is favourable to the development of life in the habitable zone of the system. In the 2009 photometry, we detect a stellar signal with a period of 5.586 $\pm$ 0.051 days, which is close to the orbital period of GJ 581b ($P=$5.37 days). However, further monitoring of the system is necessary to verify the nature of this variation.
  • The radial velocity-discovered exoplanet HD 97658b was recently announced to transit, with a derived planetary radius of 2.93 \pm 0.28 R_{Earth}. As a transiting super-Earth orbiting a bright star, this planet would make an attractive candidate for additional observations, including studies of its atmospheric properties. We present and analyze follow-up photometric observations of the HD 97658 system acquired with the MOST space telescope. Our results show no transit with the depth and ephemeris reported in the announcement paper. For the same ephemeris, we rule out transits for a planet with radius larger than 2.09 R_{Earth}, corresponding to the reported 3\sigma lower limit. We also report new radial velocity measurements which continue to support the existence of an exoplanet with a period of 9.5 days, and obtain improved orbital parameters.
  • The WR binary CV Serpentis (= WR113, WC8d + O8-9IV) has been a source of mystery since it was shown that its atmospheric eclipses change with time over decades, in addition to its sporadic dust production. The first high-precision time-dependent photometric observations obtained with the MOST space telescope in 2009 show two consecutive eclipses over the 29d orbit, with varying depths. A subsequent MOST run in 2010 showed a seemingly asymmetric eclipse profile. In order to help make sense of these observations, parallel optical spectroscopy was obtained from the Mont Megantic Observatory (2009, 2010) and from the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory (2009). Assuming these depth variations are entirely due to electron scattering in a beta-law wind, an unprecedented 62% increase in mass-loss rate is observed over one orbital period. Alternatively, no change in mass-loss rate would be required if a relatively small fraction of the carbon ions in the wind globally recombined and coaggulated to form carbon dust grains. However, it remains a mystery as to how this could occur. There also seems to be evidence for the presence of corotating interaction regions (CIR) in the WR wind: a CIR-like signature is found in the light curves, implying a potential rotation period for the WR star of 1.6 d. Finally, a new circular orbit is derived, along with constraints for the wind collision.
  • We have detected transits of the innermost planet "e" orbiting 55 Cnc (V=6.0), based on two weeks of nearly continuous photometric monitoring with the MOST space telescope. The transits occur with the period (0.74 d) and phase that had been predicted by Dawson & Fabrycky, and with the expected duration and depth for the crossing of a Sun-like star by a hot super-Earth. Assuming the star's mass and radius to be 0.963_{-0.029}^{+0.051} M_sun and 0.943 +/- 0.010 R_sun, the planet's mass, radius, and mean density are 8.63 +/- 0.35 Mearth, 2.00 +/- 0.14 Rearth, and 5.9_{-1.1}^{+1.5} g/cm^3. The mean density is comparable to that of Earth, despite the greater mass and consequently greater compression of the interior of 55 Cnc e. This suggests a rock-iron composition supplemented by a significant mass of water, gas, or other light elements. Outside of transits, we detected a sinusoidal signal resembling the expected signal due to the changing illuminated phase of the planet, but with a full range (168 +/- 70 ppm) too large to be reflected light or thermal emission. This signal has no straightforward interpretation and should be checked with further observations. The host star of 55 Cnc e is brighter than that of any other known transiting planet, which will facilitate future investigations.
  • No eclipse has been found in 15 days of almost continuous photometry of Alpha Leo with accuracy of about 0.0005 mag.
  • We compare the simultaneous 2007 space-based MOST photometry and ground-based radial velocity observations of the F5 star Procyon. We identify slow variations in the MOST data that are similar to those reported in the radial velocity (RV) time series, and confirm by comparison with the Sun that these variations are likely the signature of stellar activity. The MOST power spectrum yields clear evidence for individual oscillation frequencies that match those found in the radial velocity data by Bedding et al. (2010). We identify the same ridges due to modes of different spherical degree in both datasets, but are not able to confirm a definite ridge identification using the MOST data. We measure the luminosity amplitude per radial mode A_{l=0, phot} = 9.1 +/- 0.5 ppm. Combined with the estimate for the RV data by Arentoft et al. (2008) this gives a mean amplitude ratio of A_{l=0, phot}/A_{l=0, RV} = 0.24 +/- 0.02 ppm cm^{-1} s, considerably higher than expected from scaling relations but in reasonable agreement with theoretical models by Houdek (2010). We also compare the amplitude ratio as a function of frequency, and find that the maximum of the oscillation envelope is shifted to higher frequencies in photometry than in velocity.
  • Continuous photometric observations of five young stars obtained by the MOST satellite in 2009 and 2010 in the Taurus and Lupus star formation regions are presented. Using light curve modelling under the assumption of internal invariability of spots, we obtained small values of the solar-type differential-rotation parameter (k=0.0005-0.009) for three spotted weak-line T Tau stars, V410 Tau, V987 Tau and Lupus 3-14; for another spotted WTTS, Lupus 3-48, the data are consistent with a rigidly rotating surface (k=0). Three flares of similar rise (4 min 30 sec) and decay (1 h 45 min) times were detected in the light curve of Lupus 3-14. The brightness of the classical T Tau star RY Tau continuously decreased over 3 weeks of its observations with a variable modulation not showing any obvious periodic signal.
  • The two pulsating pre-main sequence (PMS) stars V 588 Mon and V 589 Mon were observed by CoRoT for 23.4 days in March 2008 during the Short Run SRa01 and in 2004 and 2006 by MOST for a total of ~70 days. We present their photometric variability up to 1000 $\mu$ Hz and down to residual amplitude noise levels of 23 and 10 ppm of the CoRoT data for V 588 Mon and V 589 Mon, respectively. The CoRoT imagette data as well as the two MOST data sets allowed for detailed frequency analyses using Period04 and SigSpec. We confirm all previously identified frequencies, improve the known pulsation spectra to a total of 21 frequencies for V 588 Mon and 37 for V 589 Mon and compare them to our PMS model predictions. No model oscillation spectrum with l = 0, 1, 2, and 3 p-modes matches all the observed frequencies. When rotation is included we find that the rotationally split modes of the slower rotating star, V 589 Mon, are addressable via perturbative methods while for the more rapidly rotating star, V 588 Mon, they are not and, consequently, will require more sophisticated modeling. The high precision of the CoRoT data allowed us to investigate the large density of frequencies found in the region from 0 to 300 $\mu$Hz. The presence of granulation appears to be a more attractive explanation than the excitation of high-degree modes. Granulation was modeled with a superposition of white noise, a sum of Lorentzian-like functions and a Gaussian. Our analysis clearly illustrates the need for a more sophisticated granulation model.
  • The results of a coordinated space-based photometric and ground-based spectroscopic observing campaign on the enigmatic gamma-ray binary LS 5039 are reported. Sixteen days of observations from the MOST satellite have been combined with high-resolution optical echelle spectroscopy from the 2.3m ANU Telescope in Siding Spring, Australia. These observations were used to measure the orbital parameters of the binary and to study the properties of stellar wind from the O primary. We found that any broad-band optical photometric variability at the orbital period is below the 2 mmag level, supporting the scenario that the orbital eccentricity of the system is near the 0.24 +/- 0.08 value implied by our spectroscopy, which is lower than values previously obtained by other workers. The low amplitude optical variability also implies the component masses are at the higher end of estimates based on the primary's O6.5V((f)) spectral type with a primary mass of ~26 solar masses and a mass for the compact star of at least 1.8 solar masses. The mass loss rate from the O primary was determined to be 3.7E-7 to 4.8E-7 solar masses per year.
  • Continuous photometric observations of the visible component of the single-line, K2IV spectroscopic binary II Peg carried out by the MOST satellite during 31 consecutive days in 2008 have been analyzed. On top of spot-induced brightness modulation, eleven flares were detected of three distinct types characterized by different values of rise, decay and duration times. The flares showed a preference for occurrence at rotation phases when the most spotted hemisphere is directed to the observer, confirming previous similar reports. An attempt to detect a grazing primary minimum caused by the secondary component transiting in front of the visible star gave a negative result. The brightness variability caused by spots has been interpreted within a cold spot model. An assumption of differential rotation of the primary component gave a better fit to the light curve than a solid-body rotation model.
  • As a continuation of our previous studies in 2007 and 2008, new photometric observations of the T Tauri star TW Hya obtained by the MOST satellite and the ASAS project over 40 days in 2009 with temporal resolution of 0.2 days are presented. A wavelet analysis of the combined MOST-ASAS data provides a rich picture of coherent, intermittent, variable-period oscillations, similarly as discovered in the 2008 data. The periods (1.3 - 10 days) and systematic period shortening on time scales of weeks can be interpreted within the model of magneto-rotationally controlled accretion processes in the inner accretion disk around the star. Within this model and depending on the assumed visibility of plasma parcels causing the oscillations, the observed shortest-period oscillation period may indicate the stellar rotation period of 1.3 or 2.6 d, synchronized with the disk at 4.5 or 7.1 solar radii, respectively.
  • MOST (Microvariability & Oscillations of STars) and ASAS (All Sky Automated Survey) observations have been used to characterize photometric variability of TW Hya on time scales from a fraction of a day to 7.5 weeks and from a few days to 8 years, respectively. The two data sets have very different uncertainties and temporal coverage properties and cannot be directly combined, nevertheless, they suggests a global variability spectrum with "flicker noise" properties, i.e. with amplitudes a ~ 1/sqrt(f), over >4 decades in frequency, in the range f = 0.0003 to 10 cycles per day (c/d). A 3.7 d period is clearly present in the continuous 11 day, 0.07 d time resolution, observations by MOST in 2007. Brightness extrema coincide with zero-velocity crossings in periodic (3.56 d) radial velocity variability detected in contemporaneous spectroscopic observations of Setiawan et al. (2008) and interpreted as caused by a planet. The 3.56/3.7 d periodicity was entirely absent in the second, four times longer MOST run in 2008, casting doubt on the planetary explanation. Instead, a spectrum of unstable single periods within the range of 2 - 9 days was observed; the tendency of the periods to progressively shorten was well traced using the wavelet analysis. The evolving periodicities and the overall flicker-noise characteristics of the TW Hya variability suggest a combination of several mechanisms, with the dominant ones probably related to the accretion processes from the disk around the star.
  • We present two series of MOST (Microvariability & Oscillations of STars) space-based photometry, covering nearly continuously 10 days in 2004 and 30 days in 2007, of selected variable stars in the upper Main Sequence of the old open cluster M67. New high-precision light curves were obtained for the blue-straggler binary/triple systems AH Cnc, ES Cnc and EV Cnc. The precision and phase coverage of ES Cnc and EV Cnc is by far superior to any previous observations. The light curve of ES Cnc is modelled in detail, assuming two dark photospheric spots and Roche geometry. An analysis of the light curve of AH Cnc indicates a low mass ratio (q about 0.13) and a high inclination angle for this system. Two new long-period eclipsing binaries, GSC 814-323 and HD75638 (non-members of M67) were discovered. We also present ground-based DDO spectroscopy of ES Cnc and of the newly found eclipsing binaries. Especially interesting is HD75638, a member of a visual binary, which must itself be a triple or a higher-multiplicity system. New light curves of two delta Scuti pulsators, EX Cnc and EW Cnc, have been analyzed leading to detection of 26 and 8 pulsation frequencies of high temporal stability.
  • Measuring the albedo of an extrasolar planet provides insights into its atmospheric composition and its global thermal properties, including heat dissipation and weather patterns. Such a measurement requires very precise photometry of a transiting system sampling fully many phases of the secondary eclipse. Spacebased optical photometry of the transiting system HD 209458 from the MOST (Microvariablity and Oscillations of STars) satellite, spanning 14 and 44 days in 2004 and 2005 respectively, allows us to set a sensitive limit on the optical eclipse of the hot exosolar giant planet in this system. Our best fit to the observations yields a flux ratio of the planet and star of 7 $\pm$ 9 ppm (parts per million), which corresponds to a geometric albedo through the MOST bandpass (400-700 nm) of $A_g$ = 0.038 $\pm$ 0.045. This gives a 1$\sigma$ upper limit of 0.08 for the geometric albedo and a 3$\sigma$ upper limit of 0.17. HD 209458b is significantly less reflective than Jupiter (for which $A_g$ would be about 0.5). This low geometric albedo rules out the presence of bright reflective clouds in this exoplanet's atmosphere. We determine refined parameters for the star and exoplanet in the HD 209458 system based on a model fit to the MOST light curve.
  • The Canadian MOST satellite is a unique platform for observations of bright transiting exoplanetary systems. Providing nearly continuous photometric observations for up to 8 weeks, MOST can produce important observational data to help us learn about the properties of exosolar planets. We review our current observations of HD 209458, HD 189733 with implications towards the albedo and our progress towards detecting reflected light from an exoplanet.
  • (abridged) There is considerable interest in the possible interaction between parent stars and giant planetary companions in 51 Peg-type systems. We demonstrate from MOST satellite photometry and Ca II K line emission that there has been a persistent, variable region on the surface of tau Boo A which tracked its giant planetary companion for some 440 planetary revolutions and lies ~68deg (phi=0.8) in advance of the sub-planetary point. The light curves are folded on a range of periods centered on the planetary orbital period and phase dependent variability is quantified by Fourier methods and by the mean absolute deviation (MAD) of the folded data for both the photometry and the Ca II K line reversals. The region varies in brightness on the time scale of a rotation by ~1 mmag. In 2004 it resembled a dark spot of variable depth, while in 2005 it varied between bright and dark. Over the 123 planetary orbits spanned by the photometry the variable region detected in 2004 and in 2005 are synchronised to the planetary orbital period within 0.0015 d. The Ca II K line in 2001, 2002 and 2003 also shows enhanced K-line variability centered on phi=0.8, extending coverage to some 440 planetary revolutions. The apparently constant rotation period of the variable region and its rapid variation make an explanation in terms of conventional star spots unlikely. The lack of complementary variability at phi=0.3 and the detection of the variable region so far in advance of the sub-planetary point excludes tidal excitation, but the combined photometric and Ca II K line reversal results make a good case for an active region induced magnetically on the surface of tau Boo A by its planetary companion.
  • We have made a comprehensive transit search for exoplanets down to ~1.5 - 2 Earth radii in the HD 189733 system, based on 21-days of nearly uninterrupted broadband optical photometry obtained with the MOST (Microvariability & Oscillations of STars) satellite in 2006. We have searched these data for realistic limb-darkened transits from exoplanets other than the known hot Jupiter, HD 189733b, with periods ranging from about 0.4 days to one week. Monte Carlo statistical tests of the data with synthetic transits inserted into the data-set allow us to rule out additional close-in exoplanets with sizes ranging from about 0.15 - 0.31 RJ (Jupiter radii), or 1.7 - 3.5 RE (Earth radii) on orbits whose planes are near that of HD 189733b. These null results constrain theories that invoke lower-mass hot Super-Earth and hot Neptune planets in orbits similar to HD 189733b due to the inward migration of this hot Jupiter. This work also illustrates the feasibility of discovering smaller transiting planets around chromospherically active stars.