• We present details of the construction and characterization of the coaddition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 \ugriz\ imaging data. This survey consists of 275 deg$^2$ of repeated scanning by the SDSS camera of $2.5\arcdeg$ of $\delta$ over $-50\arcdeg \le \alpha \le 60\arcdeg$ centered on the Celestial Equator. Each piece of sky has $\sim 20$ runs contributing and thus reaches $\sim2$ magnitudes fainter than the SDSS single pass data, i.e. to $r\sim 23.5$ for galaxies. We discuss the image processing of the coaddition, the modeling of the PSF, the calibration, and the production of standard SDSS catalogs. The data have $r$-band median seeing of 1.1\arcsec, and are calibrated to $\le 1%$. Star color-color, number counts, and psf size vs modelled size plots show the modelling of the PSF is good enough for precision 5-band photometry. Structure in the psf-model vs magnitude plot show minor psf mis-modelling that leads to a region where stars are being mis-classified as galaxies, and this is verified using VVDS spectroscopy. As this is a wide area deep survey there are a variety of uses for the data, including galactic structure, photometric redshift computation, cluster finding and cross wavelength measurements, weak lensing cluster mass calibrations, and cosmic shear measurements.
  • We present measurements of two types of cluster galaxy alignments based on a volume limited and highly pure ($\ge$ 90%) sample of clusters from the GMBCG catalog derived from SDSS DR7. We detect a clear BCG alignment (the alignment of major axis of the BCG toward the distribution of cluster satellite galaxies). We find that the BCG alignment signal becomes stronger as the redshift and BCG absolute magnitude decrease, and becomes weaker as BCG stellar mass decreases. No dependence of the BCG alignment on cluster richness is found. We can detect a statistically significant ($\ge$ 3 sigma) satellite alignment (the alignment of the major axes of the cluster satellite galaxies toward the BCG) only when we use the isophotal fit position angles (PAs, hereafter), and the satellite alignment depends on the apparent magnitudes rather than the absolute magnitudes of the BCGs. This suggests the detected satellite alignment based on isophotoal PAs from the SDSS pipeline is possibly due to the contamination from the diffuse light of nearby BCGs. We caution that this should not be simply interpreted as non-existence of the satellite alignment, but rather that we cannot detect them with our current photometric SDSS data. We perform our measurements on both SDSS $r$ band and $i$ band data, but did not observe a passband dependence of the alignments.
  • We present a large catalog of optically selected galaxy clusters from the application of a new Gaussian Mixture Brightest Cluster Galaxy (GMBCG) algorithm to SDSS Data Release 7 data. The algorithm detects clusters by identifying the red sequence plus Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) feature, which is unique for galaxy clusters and does not exist among field galaxies. Red sequence clustering in color space is detected using an Error Corrected Gaussian Mixture Model. We run GMBCG on 8240 square degrees of photometric data from SDSS DR7 to assemble the largest ever optical galaxy cluster catalog, consisting of over 55,000 rich clusters across the redshift range from 0.1 < z < 0.55. We present Monte Carlo tests of completeness and purity and perform cross-matching with X-ray clusters and with the maxBCG sample at low redshift. These tests indicate high completeness and purity across the full redshift range for clusters with 15 or more members.
  • The red sequence is an important feature of galaxy clusters and plays a crucial role in optical cluster detection. Measurement of the slope and scatter of the red sequence are affected both by selection of red sequence galaxies and measurement errors. In this paper, we describe a new error corrected Gaussian Mixture Model for red sequence galaxy identification. Using this technique, we can remove the effects of measurement error and extract unbiased information about the intrinsic properties of the red sequence. We use this method to select red sequence galaxies in each of the 13,823 clusters in the maxBCG catalog, and measure the red sequence ridgeline location and scatter of each. These measurements provide precise constraints on the variation of the average red galaxy populations in the observed frame with redshift. We find that the scatter of the red sequence ridgeline increases mildly with redshift, and that the slope decreases with redshift. We also observe that the slope does not strongly depend on cluster richness. Using similar methods, we show that this behavior is mirrored in a spectroscopic sample of field galaxies, further emphasizing that ridgeline properties are independent of environment.
  • We present the 'simage' software suite for the simulation of artificial extragalactic images, based empirically around real observations of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (UDF). The simulations reproduce galaxies with realistic and complex morphologies via the modeling of UDF galaxies as shapelets. Images can be created in the B, V, i and z bands for both space- and ground-based telescopes and instruments. The simulated images can be produced for any required field size, exposure time, Point Spread Function (PSF), telescope mirror size, pixel resolution, field star density, and a variety of detector noise sources. It has the capability to create images with both a pre-determined number of galaxies or one calibrated to the number counts of pre-existing data sets such as the HST COSMOS survey. In addition, simple options are included to add a known weak gravitational lensing (both shear and flexion) to the simulated images. The software is available in Interactive Data Language (IDL) and can be freely downloaded for scientific, developmental and teaching purposes.
  • We present the second report of our systematic search for strongly lensed quasars from the data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). From extensive follow-up observations of 136 candidate objects, we find 36 lenses in the full sample of 77,429 spectroscopically confirmed quasars in the SDSS Data Release 5. We then define a complete sample of 19 lenses, including 11 from our previous search in the SDSS Data Release 3, from the sample of 36,287 quasars with i<19.1 in the redshift range 0.6<z<2.2, where we require the lenses to have image separations of 1"<\theta<20" and i-band magnitude differences between the two images smaller than 1.25 mag. Among the 19 lensed quasars, 3 have quadruple-image configurations, while the remaining 16 show double images. This lens sample constrains the cosmological constant to be \Omega_\Lambda=0.84^{+0.06}_{-0.08}(stat.)^{+0.09}_{-0.07}(syst.) assuming a flat universe, which is in good agreement with other cosmological observations. We also report the discoveries of 7 binary quasars with separations ranging from 1.1" to 16.6", which are identified in the course of our lens survey. This study concludes the construction of our statistical lens sample in the full SDSS-I data set.
  • We present an improved analysis of halo substructure traced by RR Lyrae stars in the SDSS stripe 82 region. With the addition of SDSS-II data, a revised selection method based on new ugriz light curve templates results in a sample of 483 RR Lyrae stars that is essentially free of contamination. The main result from our first study persists: the spatial distribution of halo stars at galactocentric distances 5--100 kpc is highly inhomogeneous. At least 20% of halo stars within 30 kpc from the Galactic center can be statistically associated with substructure. We present strong direct evidence, based on both RR Lyrae stars and main sequence stars, that the halo stellar number density profile significantly steepens beyond a Galactocentric distance of ~30 kpc, and a larger fraction of the stars are associated with substructure. By using a novel method that simultaneously combines data for RR Lyrae and main sequence stars, and using photometric metallicity estimates for main sequence stars derived from deep co-added u-band data, we measure the metallicity of the Sagittarius dSph tidal stream (trailing arm) towards R.A.2h-3h and Dec~0 deg to be 0.3 dex higher ([Fe/H]=-1.2) than that of surrounding halo field stars. Together with a similar result for another major halo substructure, the Monoceros stream, these results support theoretical predictions that an early forming, smooth inner halo, is metal poor compared to high surface brightness material that have been accreted onto a later-forming outer halo. The mean metallicity of stars in the outer halo that are not associated with detectable clumps may still be more metal-poor than the bulk of inner-halo stars, as has been argued from other data sets.
  • We use the abundance and weak lensing mass measurements of the SDSS maxBCG cluster catalog to simultaneously constrain cosmology and the richness--mass relation of the clusters. Assuming a flat \LambdaCDM cosmology, we find \sigma_8(\Omega_m/0.25)^{0.41} = 0.832\pm 0.033 after marginalization over all systematics. In common with previous studies, our error budget is dominated by systematic uncertainties, the primary two being the absolute mass scale of the weak lensing masses of the maxBCG clusters, and uncertainty in the scatter of the richness--mass relation. Our constraints are fully consistent with the WMAP five-year data, and in a joint analysis we find \sigma_8=0.807\pm 0.020 and \Omega_m=0.265\pm 0.016, an improvement of nearly a factor of two relative to WMAP5 alone. Our results are also in excellent agreement with and comparable in precision to the latest cosmological constraints from X-ray cluster abundances. The remarkable consistency among these results demonstrates that cluster abundance constraints are not only tight but also robust, and highlight the power of optically-selected cluster samples to produce precision constraints on cosmological parameters.
  • This is the first in a series of papers on the weak lensing effect caused by clusters of galaxies in Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The photometrically selected cluster sample, known as MaxBCG, includes ~130,000 objects between redshift 0.1 and 0.3, ranging in size from small groups to massive clusters. We split the clusters into bins of richness and luminosity and stack the surface density contrast to produce mean radial profiles. The mean profiles are detected over a range of scales, from the inner halo (25 kpc/h) well into the surrounding large scale structure (30 Mpc/h), with a significance of 15 to 20 in each bin. The signal over this large range of scales is best interpreted in terms of the cluster-mass cross-correlation function. We pay careful attention to sources of systematic error, correcting for them where possible. The resulting signals are calibrated to the ~10% level, with the dominant remaining uncertainty being the redshift distribution of the background sources. We find that the profiles scale strongly with richness and luminosity. We find the signal within a given richness bin depends upon luminosity, suggesting that luminosity is more closely correlated with mass than galaxy counts. We split the samples by redshift but detect no significant evolution. The profiles are not well described by power laws. In a subsequent series of papers we invert the profiles to three-dimensional mass profiles, show that they are well fit by a halo model description, measure mass-to-light ratios and provide a cosmological interpretation.
  • We present measurements of the excess mass-to-light ratio measured aroundMaxBCG galaxy clusters observed in the SDSS. This red sequence cluster sample includes objects from small groups with masses ranging from ~5x10^{12} to ~10^{15} M_{sun}/h. Using cross-correlation weak lensing, we measure the excess mass density profile above the universal mean \Delta \rho(r) = \rho(r) - \bar{\rho} for clusters in bins of richness and optical luminosity. We also measure the excess luminosity density \Delta l(r) = l(r) - \bar{l} measured in the z=0.25 i-band. For both mass and light, we de-project the profiles to produce 3D mass and light profiles over scales from 25 kpc/ to 22 Mpc/h. From these profiles we calculate the cumulative excess mass M(r) and excess light L(r) as a function of separation from the BCG. On small scales, where \rho(r) >> \bar{\rho}, the integrated mass-to-light profile may be interpreted as the cluster mass-to-light ratio. We find the M/L_{200}, the mass-to-light ratio within r_{200}, scales with cluster mass as a power law with index 0.33+/-0.02. On large scales, where \rho(r) ~ \bar{\rho}, the M/L approaches an asymptotic value independent of cluster richness. For small groups, the mean M/L_{200} is much smaller than the asymptotic value, while for large clusters it is consistent with the asymptotic value. This asymptotic value should be proportional to the mean mass-to-light ratio of the universe <M/L>. We find <M/L>/b^2_{ml} = 362+/-54 h (statistical). There is additional uncertainty in the overall calibration at the ~10% level. The parameter b_{ml} is primarily a function of the bias of the L <~ L_* galaxies used as light tracers, and should be of order unity. Multiplying by the luminosity density in the same bandpass we find \Omega_m/b^2_{ml} = 0.02+/-0.03, independent of the Hubble parameter.
  • We present cosmological results from the statistics of lensed quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Lens Search. By taking proper account of the selection function, we compute the expected number of quasars lensed by early-type galaxies and their image separation distribution assuming a flat universe, which is then compared with 7 lenses found in the SDSS Data Release 3 to derive constraints on dark energy under strictly controlled criteria. For a cosmological constant model (w=-1) we obtain \Omega_\Lambda=0.74^{+0.11}_{-0.15}(stat.)^{+0.13}_{-0.06}(syst.). Allowing w to be a free parameter we find \Omega_M=0.26^{+0.07}_{-0.06}(stat.)^{+0.03}_{-0.05}(syst.) and w=-1.1\pm0.6(stat.)^{+0.3}_{-0.5}(syst.) when combined with the constraint from the measurement of baryon acoustic oscillations in the SDSS luminous red galaxy sample. Our results are in good agreement with earlier lensing constraints obtained using radio lenses, and provide additional confirmation of the presence of dark energy consistent with a cosmological constant, derived independently of type Ia supernovae.
  • We report the first results of our systematic search for strongly lensed quasars using the spectroscopically confirmed quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Among 46,420 quasars from the SDSS Data Release 3 (~4188 deg^2), we select a subsample of 22,683 quasars that are located at redshifts between 0.6 and 2.2 and are brighter than the Galactic extinction corrected i-band magnitude of 19.1. We identify 220 lens candidates from the quasar subsample, for which we conduct extensive and systematic follow-up observations in optical and near-infrared wavebands, in order to construct a complete lensed quasar sample at image separations between 1'' and 20'' and flux ratios of faint to bright lensed images larger than 10^{-0.5}. We construct a statistical sample of 11 lensed quasars. Ten of these are galaxy-scale lenses with small image separations (~1''-2'') and one is a large separation (15'') system which is produced by a massive cluster of galaxies, representing the first statistical sample of lensed quasars including both galaxy- and cluster-scale lenses. The Data Release 3 spectroscopic quasars contain an additional 11 lensed quasars outside the statistical sample.
  • We interpret and model the statistical weak lensing measurements around 130,000 groups and clusters of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey presented by Sheldon et al. 2007 (Paper I). We present non-parametric inversions of the 2D shear profiles to the mean 3D cluster density and mass profiles in bins of both optical richness and cluster i-band luminosity. We correct the inferred 3D profiles for systematic effects, including non-linear shear and the fact that cluster halos are not all precisely centered on their brightest galaxies. We also model the measured cluster shear profile as a sum of contributions from the brightest central galaxy, the cluster dark matter halo, and neighboring halos. We infer the relations between mean cluster virial mass and optical richness and luminosity over two orders of magnitude in cluster mass; the virial mass at fixed richness or luminosity is determined with a precision of 13% including both statistical and systematic errors. We also constrain the halo concentration parameter and halo bias as a function of cluster mass; both are in good agreement with predictions of LCDM models. The methods employed here will be applicable to deeper, wide-area optical surveys that aim to constrain the nature of the dark energy, such as the Dark Energy Survey, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and space-based surveys.
  • We report follow-up observations of two gravitational lens candidates identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) dataset. We have confirmed that SDSS J102111.02+491330.4 is a previously unknown gravitationally lensed quasar. This lens system exhibits two images of a $z = 1.72$ quasar, with an image separation of $1{\farcs}14 \pm 0.04$. Optical and near-IR imaging of the system reveals the presence of the lensing galaxy between the two quasar images. Observations of SDSS J112012.12+671116.0 indicate that it is more likely a binary quasar than a gravitational lens. This system has two quasars at a redshift of $z = 1.49$, with an angular separation of $1{\farcs}49 \pm 0.02$. However, the two quasars have markedly different SEDs and no lens galaxy is apparent in optical and near-IR images of this system. We also present a list of 31 SDSS lens candidates which follow-up observations have confirmed are \textit{not} gravitational lenses.
  • We present a new non-parametric method for determining mean 3D density and mass profiles from weak lensing measurements around stacked samples of galaxies or clusters, that is, from measurement of the galaxy-shear or cluster-shear correlation functions. Since the correlation function is statistically isotropic, this method evades problems, such as projection of large-scale structure along the line of sight or halo asphericity, that complicate attempts to infer masses from weak lensing measurements of individual objects. We demonstrate the utility of this method in measuring halo profiles, galaxy-mass and cluster-mass cross-correlation functions, and cluster virial masses. We test this method on an N-body simulation and show that it correctly and accurately recovers the 3D density and mass profiles of halos. We find no evidence of problems due to a mass sheet degeneracy in the simulation. Cross-correlation lensing provides a powerful method for calibrating the mass-observable relation for use in measurement of the cluster mass function in large surveys. It can also be used on large scales to measure and remove the halo bias and thereby provide a direct measurement of Omega_m * sigma_8.
  • We report the discovery of a new two-image gravitationally lensed quasar, SDSS J024634.11-082536.2 (SDSS J0246-0825). This object was selected as a lensed quasar candidate from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) by the same algorithm that was used to discover other SDSS lensed quasars (e.g., SDSS J0924+0219). Multicolor imaging with the Magellan Consortium's Walter Baade 6.5-m telescope and the spectroscopic observations using the W. M. Keck Observatory's Keck II telescope confirm that SDSS J0246-0825 consists of two lensed images ($\Delta{\theta}=$1\farcs04) of a source quasar at z=1.68. Imaging observations with the Keck telescope and the Hubble Space Telescope reveal an extended object between the two quasar components, which is likely to be a lensing galaxy of this system. From the absorption lines in the spectra of quasar components and the apparent magnitude of the galaxy, combined with the expected absolute magnitude from the Faber-Jackson relation, we estimate the redshift of the lensing galaxy to be z=0.724. A highly distorted ring is visible in the Hubble Space Telescope images, which is likely to be the lensed host galaxy of the source quasar. Simple mass modeling predicts the possibility that there is a small (faint) lensing object near the primary lensing galaxy.
  • We present a sample of 218 new quasar pairs with proper transverse separations R_prop < 1 Mpc/h over the redshift range 0.5 < z < 3.0, discovered from an extensive follow up campaign to find companions around the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and 2dF Quasar Redshift Survey quasars. This sample includes 26 new binary quasars with separations R_prop < 50 kpc/h (theta < 10 arcseconds), more than doubling the number of such systems known. We define a statistical sample of binaries selected with homogeneous criteria and compute its selection function, taking into account sources of incompleteness. The first measurement of the quasar correlation function on scales 10 kpc/h < R_prop < 400 kpc/h is presented. For R_prop < 40 kpc/h, we detect an order of magnitude excess clustering over the expectation from the large scale R_prop > 3 Mpc/h quasar correlation function, extrapolated down as a power law to the separations probed by our binaries. The excess grows to ~ 30 at R_prop ~ 10 kpc/h, and provides compelling evidence that the quasar autocorrelation function gets progressively steeper on sub-Mpc scales. This small scale excess can likely be attributed to dissipative interaction events which trigger quasar activity in rich environments. Recent small scale measurements of galaxy clustering and quasar-galaxy clustering are reviewed and discussed in relation to our measurement of small scale quasar clustering.
  • We report the discovery of a fifth image in the large separation lensed quasar system SDSS J1004+4112. A faint point source located 0.2'' from the center of the brightest galaxy in the lensing cluster is detected in images taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. The flux ratio between the point source and the brightest lensed component in the ACS image is similar to that in the NICMOS image. The location and brightness of the point source are consistent with lens model predictions for a lensed image. We therefore conclude that the point source is likely to be a fifth image of the source quasar. In addition, the NICMOS image reveals the lensed host galaxy of the source quasar, which can strongly constrain the structure of the lensing critical curves and thereby the mass distribution of the lensing cluster.
  • We discuss the galaxy-galaxy-mass three-point correlation function and show how to measure it with weak gravitational lensing. The method entails choosing a large of pairs of foreground lens galaxies and constructing a mean shear map with respect to their axis, by averaging the ellipticities of background source galaxies. An average mass map can be reconstructed from this shear map and this will represent the average mass distribution around pairs of galaxies. We show how this mass map is related to the projected galaxy-galaxy-mass three-point correlation function. Using a large N-body dark matter simulation populated with galaxies using the Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) bias prescription, we compute these correlation functions, mass maps, and shear maps. The resultant mass maps are distinctly bimodal, tracing the galaxy centers and remaining anisotropic up to scales much larger than the galaxy separation. At larger scales, the shear is approximately tangential about the center of the pair but with small azimuthal variation in amplitude. We estimate the signal-to-noise ratio of the reconstructed mass maps for a survey of similar depth to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and conclude that the galaxy-galaxy-mass three-point function should be measurable with the current SDSS weak lensing data. Measurements of this three-point function, along with galaxy-galaxy lensing and galaxy auto-correlation functions, will provide new constraints on galaxy bias models. The anisotropic shear profile around close pairs of galaxies is a prediction of cold dark matter models and may be difficult to reconcile with alternative theories of gravity without dark matter.
  • We report the discovery of two doubly-imaged quasars, SDSS J100128.61+502756.9 and SDSS J120629.65+433217.6, at redshifts of 1.838 and 1.789 and with image separations of 2.86'' and 2.90'', respectively. The objects were selected as lens candidates from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Based on the identical nature of the spectra of the two quasars in each pair and the identification of the lens galaxies, we conclude that the objects are gravitational lenses. The lenses are complicated; in both systems there are several galaxies in the fields very close to the quasars, in addition to the lens galaxies themselves. The lens modeling implies that these nearby galaxies contribute significantly to the lens potentials. On larger scales, we have detected an enhancement in the galaxy density near SDSS J100128.61+502756.9. The number of lenses with image separation of ~3'' in the SDSS already exceeds the prediction of simple theoretical models based on the standard Lambda-dominated cosmology and observed velocity function of galaxies.
  • We present seven epochs of spectroscopy on the quadruply imaged quasar SDSS J1004+4112, spanning observed-frame time delays from 1 to 322 days. The spectra reveal differences in the emission lines between the lensed images. Specifically, component A showed a strong enhancement in the blue wings of several high-ionization lines relative to component B, which lasted at least 28 days (observed frame) then faded. Since the predicted time delay between A and B is <30 days, our time coverage suggests that the event was not intrinsic to the quasar. We attribute these variations to microlensing of part of the broad emission line region of the quasar, apparently resolving structure in the source plane on a scale of ~10^{16} cm at z=1.734. In addition, we observed smaller differences in the emission line profiles between components A and B that persisted throughout the time span, which may also be due to microlensing or millilensing. Further spectroscopic monitoring of this system holds considerable promise for resolving the structure of the broad emission line region in quasars.
  • We report the discovery of the two-image gravitationally lensed quasar SDSS J1335+0118. The object was selected as a lens candidate from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The imaging and spectroscopic follow-up observations confirm that the system exhibits two gravitationally lensed images of a quasar at z=1.57. The image separation is 1.56''. We also detect an extended component between the two quasar images, likely the lensing galaxy. Preliminary mass modeling predicts the differential time delay \Delta t ~ 30 h^{-1} day assuming the redshift of the lens galaxy is 0.5.
  • We report the discovery of SDSSJ115517.35+634622.0, a previously unknown gravitationally lensed quasar. The lens system exhibits two images of a $z = 2.89$ quasar, with an image separation of $1{\farcs}832 \pm 0.007$ . Near-IR imaging of the system reveals the presence of the lensing galaxy between the two quasar images. Based on absorption features seen in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectrum, we determine a lens galaxy redshift of $z = 0.1756$. The lens is rather unusual in that one of the quasar images is only $0{\farcs}22\pm0{\farcs}07$ ($\sim 0.1 R_{\rm eff}$) from the center of the lens galaxy and photometric modeling indicates that this image is significantly brighter than predicted by a SIS model. This system was discovered in the course of an ongoing search for strongly lensed quasars in the dataset from the SDSS.
  • We report the discovery of a new gravitationally lensed quasar from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, SDSS J090334.92+502819.2. This object was targeted for SDSS spectroscopy as a Luminous Red Galaxy (LRG), but manual examination of the spectrum showed the presence of a quasar at z= 3.6 in addition to a red galaxy at z=0.388, and the SDSS image showed a second possible quasar image nearby. Follow-up imaging and spectroscopy confirmed the lensing hypothesis. In images taken at the ARC 3.5-meter telescope, two quasars are separated by 2.8 arc-seconds; the lensing galaxy is clearly seen and is blended with one of the quasar images. Spectroscopy taken at the Keck II telescope shows that the quasars have identical redshifts of z=3.6 and both show the presence of the same broad absorption line-like troughs. We present simple lens models which account for the geometry and magnifications. The lens galaxy lies near two groups of galaxies and may be a part of them. The models suggest that the groups may contribute considerable shear and may have a strong effect on the lens configuration.
  • We report the discovery of a new gravitationally lensed quasar from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, SDSS J092455.87+021924.9 (SDSS J0924+0219). This object was selected from among known SDSS quasars by an algorithm that was designed to select another known SDSS lensed quasar (SDSS 1226-0006A,B). Five separate components, three of which are unresolved, are identified in photometric follow-up observations obtained with the Magellan Consortium's 6.5m Walter Baade telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. Two of the unresolved components (designated A and B) are confirmed to be quasars with z=1.524; the velocity difference is less than 100 km sec^{-1} according to spectra taken with the W. M. Keck Observatory's Keck II telescope on Mauna Kea. A third stellar component, designated C, has the colors of a quasar with redshift similar to components A and B. The maximum separation of the point sources is 1.78". The other two sources, designated G and D, are resolved. Component G appears to be the best candidate for the lensing galaxy. Although component D is near the expected position of the fourth lensed component in a four image lens system, its properties are not consistent with being the image of a quasar at z~1.5. Nevertheless, the identical redshifts of components A and B and the presence of component C strongly suggest that this object is a gravitational lens. Our observations support the idea that a foreground object reddens the fourth lensed component and that another unmodeled effect (such as micro- or milli-lensing) demagnificates it, but we cannot rule out the possibility that SDSS0924+0219 is an example of the relatively rare class of ``three component'' lens systems.