• We propose the idea that time evolution of quantum systems is driven by work. The formalism presented here falls within the scope of a recently proposed theory of gravitating quantum matter where extractible work, and not energy, is responsible for gravitation. Our main assumption is that extractible work, and not the Hamiltonian, dictates dynamics. We find that expectation values of meaningful quantities, such as the occupation number, deviate from those predicted by standard quantum mechanics. The scope, applications and validity of this proposal are also discussed.
  • We study the full time evolution of one- and two-mode bosonic quantum systems that interact through single- and two-mode squeezing Hamiltonians. We establish that the single- and two-mode cases are formally equivalent, leading to the same differential equations encoding the full time evolution. These differential equations can be easily employed in any application. We analytically predict a dramatic transition in the population of the modes when the coupling takes a specific critical value, leading to exponential growth of the excitation population. We discuss the validity, scope and generality of our results.
  • Models of quantum systems on curved space-times lack sufficient experimental verification. Some speculative theories suggest that quantum properties, such as entanglement, may exhibit entirely different behavior to purely classical systems. By measuring this effect or lack thereof, we can test the hypotheses behind several such models. For instance, as predicted by Ralph and coworkers [T C Ralph, G J Milburn, and T Downes, Phys. Rev. A, 79(2):22121, 2009, T C Ralph and J Pienaar, New Journal of Physics, 16(8):85008, 2014], a bipartite entangled system could decohere if each particle traversed through a different gravitational field gradient. We propose to study this effect in a ground to space uplink scenario. We extend the above theoretical predictions of Ralph and coworkers and discuss the scientific consequences of detecting/failing to detect the predicted gravitational decoherence. We present a detailed mission design of the European Space Agency's (ESA) Space QUEST (Space - Quantum Entanglement Space Test) mission, and study the feasibility of the mission schema.
  • We study how quantum systems that propagate in the spacetime of a rotating planet are affected by the curved background. Spacetime curvature affects wavepackets of photons propagating from Earth to a satellite, and the changes in the wavepacket encode the parameters of the spacetime. This allows us to evaluate quantitatively how quantum communications are affected by the curved spacetime background of the Earth and to achieve precise measurements of Earth's Schwarzschild radius and equatorial angular velocity. We then provide a comparison with the state of the art in parameter estimation obtained through classical means. Satellite to satellite communications and future directions are also discussed.
  • We study the properties of bi-squeezed tripartite Gaussian states created by two spontaneous parametric down-conversion processes that share a common idler. We give a complete description of the quantum correlations across of all partitions, as well as of the genuine multipartite entanglement, obtaining analytical expressions for most of the quantities of interest. We find that the state contains genuine tripartite entanglement, in addition to the bipartite entanglement among the modes that are directly squeezed. We also investigate the effect of homodyne detection of the photons in the common idler mode, and analyse the final reduced state of the remaining two signal modes. We find that this measurement leads to a conversion of the coherence of the two signal modes into entanglement, a phenomenon that can be regarded as a redistribution of quantum resources between the modes. The applications of these results to quantum optics and circuit quantum electrodynamics platforms are also discussed.
  • Relativistic quantum metrology provides an optimal strategy for the estimation of parameters encoded in quantum fields in flat and curved spacetime. These parameters usually correspond to physical quantities of interest such as proper times, accelerations, gravitational field strengths, among other spacetime parameters. The precise estimation of these parameters can lead to novel applications in gravimeters, spacetime probes and gravitational wave detectors. Previous work in this direction only considered pure probe states. In realistic situations, however, probe states are mixed. In this paper, we provide a framework for the computation of optimal precision bounds for mixed single- and two-mode Gaussian states within quantum field theory. This enables the estimation of spacetime parameters in case the field states are initially at finite temperature.
  • We propose the idea that not all energy is a source of gravity. We discuss the role of energy in the theory of gravitation and provide a formulation of gravity which takes into account the quantum nature of the source. We show that gravity depends dramatically on the entanglement present between the constituents of the Universe. Applications of the theory and open questions are also discussed.
  • At the beginning of the previous century, Newtonian mechanics fell victim to two new revolutionary theories, Quantum Mechanics (QM) and General Relativity (GR). Both theories have transformed our view of physical phenomena, with QM accurately predicting the results of experiments taking place at small length scales, and GR correctly describing observations at larger length scales. However, despite the impressive predictive power of each theory in their respective regimes, their unification still remains unresolved. Theories and proposals for their unification exist but we are lacking experimental guidance towards the true unifying theory. Probing GR at small length scales where quantum effects become relevant is particularly problematic but recently there has been a growing interest in probing the opposite regime, QM at large scales where relativistic effects are important. This is principally due to the fact that experimental techniques in quantum physics have developed rapidly in recent years with the promise of quantum technologies. Here we review recent advances in experimental and theoretical work on quantum experiments that will be able to probe relativistic effects of gravity on quantum properties, playing particular attention to the role of Quantum Field Theory in Curved Spacetime (QFTCS) in describing these experiments. Interestingly, theoretical work using QFTCS has illustrated that these quantum experiments could be used to enhance measurements of gravitational effects, such as Gravitational Waves (GWs). Furthermore, verification of such enhancements, as well as other QFTCS predictions in quantum experiments, would provide the first direct validation of this limiting case of quantum gravity, several decades after it was initially proposed.
  • We investigate the quantum thermodynamical properties of localised relativistic quantum fields, and how they can be used as quantum thermal machines. We study the efficiency and power of energy transfer between the classical gravitational degrees of freedom, such as the energy input due to the motion of boundaries or an impinging gravitational wave, and the excitations of a confined quantum field. We find that the efficiency of energy transfer depends dramatically on the input initial state of the system. Furthermore, we investigate the ability of the system to extract energy from a gravitational wave and store it in a battery. This process is inefficient in optical cavities but is significantly enhanced when employing trapped Bose Einstein condensates. We also employ standard fluctuation results to obtain the work probability distribution, which allows us to understand how the efficiency is related to the dissipation of work. Finally, we apply our techniques to a setup where an impinging gravitational wave excites the phononic modes of a Bose Einstein condensate. We find that, in this case, the percentage of energy transferred to the phonons approaches unity after a suitable amount of time. These results suggest that, in the future, it might be possible to explore ways to exploit relativistic phenomena to harvest energy.
  • Quasiparticles in a Bose-Einstein condensate are sensitive to space-time distortions. Gravitational waves can induce transformations on the state of phonons that can be observed through quantum state discrimination techniques. We show that this method is highly robust to thermal noise and depletion. We derive a bound on the strain sensitivity that shows that the detection of waves in the kHz regime is not significantly affected by temperature in a wide range of parameters that are well within current experimental reach.
  • We show how to use relativistic motion and local phase shifts to generate continuous variable Gaussian cluster states within cavity modes. Our results can be demonstrated experimentally using superconducting circuits where tuneable boundary conditions correspond to mirrors moving with velocities close to the speed of light. In particular, we propose the generation of a quadripartite square cluster state as a first example that can be readily implemented in the laboratory. Since cluster states are universal resources for universal one-way quantum computation, our results pave the way for relativistic quantum computation schemes.
  • We investigate a scenario where quantum correlations affect the gravitational field. We show that quantum correlations between particles occupying different positions have an effect on the gravitational field. We find that the small perturbations induced by the entanglement depend on the amount of entanglement and vanish for vanishing quantum correlations. Our results suggest that there is a form of entanglement that has a weight, since it affects the gravitational field. This conclusion may lead towards a new understanding of the role of quantum correlations within the overlap of relativistic and quantum theories.
  • We investigate the thermodynamical properties of quantum fields in curved spacetime. Our approach is to consider quantum fields in curved spacetime as a quantum system undergoing an out-of-equilibrium transformation. The non-equilibrium features are studied by using a formalism which has been developed to derive fluctuation relations and emergent irreversible features beyond the linear response regime. We apply these ideas to an expanding universe scenario, therefore avoiding assumptions on the relation between entropy and quantum matter. We provide a fluctuation theorem which allows us to understand particle production due to the expansion of the universe as an entropic increase. Our results pave the way towards a different understanding of the thermodynamics of relativistic and quantum systems in our universe.
  • We establish a rigorous connection between fundamental resource theories at the quantum scale. Correlations and entanglement constitute indispensable resources for numerous quantum information tasks. However, their establishment comes at the cost of energy, the resource of thermodynamics, and is limited by the initial entropy. Here, the optimal conversion of energy into correlations is investigated. Assuming the presence of a thermal bath, we establish general bounds for arbitrary systems and construct a protocol saturating them. The amount of correlations, quantified by the mutual information, can increase at most linearly with the available energy, and we determine where the linear regime breaks down. We further consider the generation of genuine quantum correlations, focusing on the fundamental constituents of our universe: fermions and bosons. For fermionic modes, we find the optimal entangling protocol. For bosonic modes, we show that while Gaussian operations can be outperformed in creating entanglement, their performance is optimal for high energies.
  • We propose a quantum experiment to measure with high precision the Schwarzschild space-time parameters of the Earth. The scheme can also be applied to measure distances by taking into account the curvature of the Earth's space-time. As a wave-packet of (entangled) light is sent from the Earth to a satellite it is red-shifted and deformed due to the curvature of space-time. Measurements after the propagation enable the estimation of the space-time parameters. We compare our results with the state of the art, which involves classical measurement methods, and discuss what developments are required in space-based quantum experiments to improve on the current measurement of the Schwarzschild radius of the Earth.
  • We show that gravitational waves create phonons in a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). A traveling spacetime distortion produces particle creation resonances that correspond to the dynamical Casimir effect in a BEC phononic field contained in a cavity-type trap. We propose to use this effect to detect gravitational waves. The amplitude of the wave can be estimated applying recently developed relativistic quantum metrology techniques. We provide the optimal precision bound on the estimation of the wave's amplitude. Finally, we show that the parameter regime required to detect gravitational waves with this technique could be, in principle, within experimental reach in a medium-term timescale.
  • We propose a repeat-until-success protocol to improve the performance of probabilistic quantum repeaters. Quantum repeaters rely on passive static linear optics elements and photodetectors to perform Bell-state measurements (BSMs). Conventionally, the success rate of these BSMs cannot exceed 50%, which is an impediment for entanglement swapping between distant quantum memories. Every time that a BSM fails, entanglement needs to be re-distributed between the corresponding memories in the repeater link. The key ingredient in our scheme is a repeatable BSM. Although it too relies only on linear optics and photo-detection, it ideally allows us to repeat every BSM until it succeeds. This, in principle, can turn a probabilistic quantum repeater into a deterministic one. Under realistic conditions, where our measurement devices are lossy, our repeatable BSMs may also fail. However, we show that by using additional threshold detectors, we can improve the entanglement generation rate between one and two orders of magnitude as compared to the probabilistic repeater systems that rely on conventional BSMs. This improvement is sufficient to make the performance of probabilistic quantum repeaters comparable with some of existing proposals for deterministic quantum repeaters.
  • We propose an experiment to test the effects of gravity and acceleration on quantum entanglement in space-based setups. We show that the entanglement between excitations of two Bose-Einstein condensates is degraded after one of them undergoes a change in the gravitational field strength. This prediction can be tested if the condensates are initially entangled in two separate satellites while being in the same orbit and then one of them moves to a different orbit. We show that the effect is observable in a typical orbital manoeuvre of nanosatellites like CanX4 and CanX5.
  • We present a framework for relativistic quantum metrology that is useful for both Earth-based and space-based technologies. Quantum metrology has been so far successfully applied to design precision instruments such as clocks and sensors which outperform classical devices by exploiting quantum properties. There are advanced plans to implement these and other quantum technologies in space, for instance Space-QUEST and Space Optical Clock projects intend to implement quantum communications and quantum clocks at regimes where relativity starts to kick in. However, typical setups do not take into account the effects of relativity on quantum properties. To include and exploit these effects, we introduce techniques for the application of metrology to quantum field theory. Quantum field theory properly incorporates quantum theory and relativity, in particular, at regimes where space-based experiments take place. This framework allows for high precision estimation of parameters that appear in quantum field theory including proper times and accelerations. Indeed, the techniques can be applied to develop a novel generation of relativistic quantum technologies for gravimeters, clocks and sensors. As an example, we present a high precision device which in principle improves the state-of-the-art in quantum accelerometers by exploiting relativistic effects.
  • We investigate the consequences of space-time being curved on space-based quantum communication protocols. We analyze tasks that require either the exchange of single photons in a certain entanglement distribution protocol or beams of light in a continuous-variable quantum key distribution scheme. We find that gravity affects the propagation of photons, therefore adding additional noise to the channel for the transmission of information. The effects could be measured with current technology.
  • We propose a scheme to investigate whether non-uniform motion degrades entanglement of a relativistic quantum field that is localised both in space and in time. For a Dirichlet scalar field in a cavity in Minkowski space, in small but freely-adjustable acceleration of finite but arbitrarily long duration, degradation of observable magnitude occurs for massless transverse quanta of optical wavelength at Earth gravity acceleration and for kaon mass quanta already at microgravity acceleration. We outline a space-based experiment for observing the effect and its gravitational counterpart.
  • In quantum metrology quantum properties such as squeezing and entanglement are exploited in the design of a new generation of clocks, sensors and other measurement devices that can outperform their classical counterparts. Applications of great technological relevance lie in the precise measurement of parameters which play a central role in relativity, such as proper accelerations, relative distances, time and gravitational field strengths. In this paper we generalise recently introduced techniques to estimate physical quantities within quantum field theory in flat and curved space-time. We consider a bosonic quantum field that undergoes a generic transformation, which encodes the parameter to be estimated. We present analytical formulas for optimal precision bounds on the estimation of small parameters in terms of Bogoliubov coefficients for single mode and two-mode Gaussian channels.
  • We investigate the possibility to generate quantum-correlated quasi-particles utilizing analogue gravity systems. The quantumness of these correlations is a key aspect of analogue gravity effects and their presence allows for a clear separation between classical and quantum analogue gravity effects. However, experiments in analogue systems, such as Bose-Einstein condensates, and shallow water waves, are always conducted at non-ideal conditions, in particular, one is dealing with dispersive media at nonzero temperatures. We analyze the influence of the initial temperature on the entanglement generation in analogue gravity phenomena. We lay out all the necessary steps to calculate the entanglement generated between quasi-particle modes and we analytically derive an upper bound on the maximal temperature at which given modes can still be entangled. We further investigate a mechanism to enhance the quantum correlations. As a particular example we analyze the robustness of the entanglement creation against thermal noise in a sudden quench of an ideally homogeneous Bose-Einstein condensate, taking into account the super-sonic dispersion relations.
  • We show that the relativistic motion of a quantum system can be used to generate quantum gates. The nonuniform acceleration of a cavity is used to generate well-known two-mode quantum gates in continuous variables. Observable amounts of entanglement between the cavity modes are produced through resonances which appear by repeating periodically any trajectory.
  • We show that mode-mixing quantum gates can be produced by non-uniform relativistic acceleration. Periodic motion in cavities exhibits a series of resonant conditions producing entangling quantum gates between different frequency modes. The resonant condition associated with particle creation is the main feature of the dynamical Casimir effect which has been recently demonstrated in superconducting circuits. We show that a second resonance, which has attracted less attention since it implies negligible particle production, produces a beam splitting quantum gate leading to a resonant enhancement of entanglement which can be used as the first evidence of acceleration effects in mechanical oscillators. We propose a desktop experiment where the frequencies associated with this second resonance can be produced mechanically.