• We study a novel interacting dark energy $-$ dark matter scenario where the anisotropic stress of the large scale inhomogeneities is considered. The dark energy has a constant barotropic state parameter and the interaction model produces stable perturbations in the large scale of the universe. The resulting picture has been constrained using different astronomical data in a spatially flat Friedmann-Lema\^itre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) universe. We perform different combined analyses of the astronomical data to measure the effects of the anisotropic stress on the strength of the interaction and on other cosmological parameters as well. The analyses from several combined data show that a non-zero interaction in the dark sector is favored while a non-interaction scenario is still allowed within 68\% confidence-level (CL). The anisotropic stress measured from the observational data is also found to be small, and its zero value is permitted within the 68\% CL. The constraints on the dark energy equation of state, $w_x$, also point toward its `$-1$' value and hence the resulting picture looks like a non-interacting $w_x$CDM as well as $\Lambda$CDM cosmology. However, from the ratio of the CMB TT spectra, we see that the model has a deviation from the standard $\Lambda$CDM cosmology which is very hard to detect from the CMB TT spectra only. Although the deviation is not much significant, but from the present astronomical data, we cannot exclude such deviation. Overall, we find that the model is very close to the $\Lambda$CDM cosmology. Perhaps, a more accurate conclusion can be made with the next generation of surveys that are not so far. We also argue that the current tension on $H_0$ might be released for some combinations of the observational data. In fact, the allowance of $w_x$ in the phantom region is found to be more effective to release the tension on $H_0$.
  • We investigate the efficiency of screening mechanisms in the hybrid metric-Palatini gravity. The value of the field is computed around spherical bodies embedded in a background of constant density. We find a thin shell condition for the field depending on the background field value. In order to quantify how the thin shell effect is relevant, we analyze how it behaves in the neighborhood of different astrophysical objects (planets, moons or stars). We find that the condition is very well satisfied except only for some peculiar objects. Furthermore we establish bounds on the model using data from solar system experiments such as the spectral deviation measured by the Cassini mission and the stability of the Earth-Moon system, which gives the best constraint to date on $f(R)$ theories. These bounds contribute to fix the range of viable hybrid gravity models.
  • In order to determine the observable signatures of modified gravity theories, it is important to consider the effect of baryonic physics. We use a modified version of the ISIS code to run cosmological hydrodynamic simulations to study degeneracies between modified gravity and radiative hydrodynamical processes. Of these, one was the standard $\Lambda$CDM model and four were variations of the Symmetron model. For each model we ran three variations of baryonic processes: non-radiative hydrodynamics; cooling and star formation; and cooling, star formation, and supernova feedback. We construct stacked gas density, temperature, and dark matter density profiles of the halos in the simulations, and study the differences between them. We find that both radiative variations of the models show degeneracies between their processes and at least two of the three parameters defining the Symmetron model.
  • We investigate the effects of a disformal coupling between dark energy and dark matter in the predictions of the spherical collapse and its signatures in galaxy cluster number counts. We find that the disformal coupling has no significant effects on spherical collapse at high redshifts, and in particular during matter domination epoch. However, at lower redshifts, the extrapolated linear density contrast at collapse close to redshift $z \lesssim 1$ and overdensity at virialization can be strongly suppressed by a disformal coupling between dark energy and dark matter. We also find that the predicted number of clusters per one square degree and redshift is enhanced in dark energy - dark matter models disformally coupled with respect to models with a conformal coupling and models where there is no coupling at all. Increasing the magnitude of the coupling, the number of clusters can be largely enhanced compared with the conformal coupling and uncoupling models at redshift lower than $0.1$ in the disformally coupled model.
  • Consistency relations of large-scale structures provide exact nonperturbative results for cross-correlations of cosmic fields in the squeezed limit. They only depend on the equivalence principle and the assumption of Gaussian initial conditions, and remain nonzero at equal times for cross-correlations of density fields with velocity or momentum fields, or with the time derivative of density fields. We show how to apply these relations to observational probes that involve the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect or the kinematic Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. In the squeezed limit, this allows us to express the three-point cross-correlations, or bispectra, of two galaxy or matter density fields, or weak lensing convergence fields, with the secondary Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) distortion in terms of products of a linear and a nonlinear power spectrum. In particular, we find that cross-correlations with the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect show a specific angular dependence. These results could be used to test the equivalence principle and the primordial Gaussianity, or to check the modeling of large-scale structures.
  • Stability analysis of interacting dark energy models generally divides its parameters space into two regions: (i) $w_x \geq -1$ and $\xi \geq 0$ and (ii) $w_x \leq -1$ and $\xi \leq 0$, where $w_x$ is the dark energy equation of state and $\xi$ is the coupling strength of the interaction. Due to this separation, crucial information about the cosmology and phenomenology of these models may be lost. In a recent study it has been shown that one can unify the two regions with a coupling function which depends on the dark energy equation of state. In this work we introduce a new coupling function which also unifies the two regions of the parameter space and generalises the previous proposal. We analyse this scenario considering the equation of state of DE to be either constant or dynamical. We study the cosmology of such models and constrain both scenarios with the use of latest astronomical data from both background evolution as well as large scale structures. Our analysis shows that the observational data allow a very small but nonzero deviation from the $\Lambda$-cosmology, although within $1\sigma$ confidence-region the interacting models can mimick the $\Lambda$-cosmology. In fact we observe that the models both at background and perturbative levels are very hard to distinguish form each other and from $\Lambda$-cosmology as well. Finally, we offer a rigorous analysis on the current tension on $H_0$ allowing different regions of the dark energy equation of state which shows that interacting dark energy models reasonably solve the current tension on $H_0$.
  • We study a theory of gravity in which the action is a result from the general purely disformal transformation on the Einstein-Hilbert action. This theory is a sub-class of GLPV theory which is the the generalization of covariant Galileon. Nevertheless, we find that the self accelerating solution for the background universe disappears in this theory. We also find that, for this theory, the Vainshtein mechanism is absent. However, the Vainshtein mechanism is not necessary for this theory, because this theory can nearly mimic the Einstein theory of gravity at all scales inside the Huble radius without this mechanism.
  • We put constraints on dark energy properties using the PADE parameterisation, and compare it to the same constraints using Chevalier-Polarski-Linder (CPL) and $\Lambda$CDM, at both the background and the perturbation levels. The dark energy equation of state parameter of the models is derived following the mathematical treatment of PADE expansion. Unlike CPL parameterisation, the PADE approximation provides different forms of the equation of state parameter which avoid the divergence in the far future. Initially, we perform a likelihood analysis in order to put constraints on the model parameters using solely background expansion data and we find that all parameterisations are consistent with each other. Then, combining the expansion and the growth rate data we test the viability of PADE parameterisations and compare them with CPL and $\Lambda$CDM models respectively. Specifically, we find that the growth rate of the current PADE parameterisations is lower than $\Lambda$CDM model at low redshifts, while the differences among the models are negligible at high redshifts. In this context, we provide for the first time growth index of linear matter perturbations in PADE cosmologies. Considering that dark energy is homogeneous we recover the well known asymptotic value of the growth index, namely $\gamma_{\infty}=\frac{3(w_{\infty}-1)}{6w_{\infty}-5}$, while in the case of clustered dark energy we obtain $\gamma_{\infty}\simeq \frac{3w_{\infty}(3w_{\infty}-5)}{(6w_{\infty}-5)(3w_{\infty}-1)}$. Finally, we generalize the growth index analysis in the case where $\gamma$ is allowed to vary with redshift and we find that the form of $\gamma(z)$ in PADE parameterisation extends that of the CPL and $\Lambda$CDM cosmologies respectively.
  • We investigate how three different possibilities of neutrino mass hierarchies, namely normal, inverted, and degenerate, can affect the observational constraints on three well known dynamical dark energy models, namely the Chevallier-Polarski-Linder, logarithmic, and the Jassal-Bagla-Padmanabhan parametrizations. In order to impose the observational constraints on the models, we performed a robust analysis using Planck 2015 temperature and polarization data, Supernovae type Ia from Joint Light curve analysis, baryon acoustic oscillations distance measurements, redshift space distortion characterized by $f(z)\sigma_8(z)$ data, weak gravitational lensing data from Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey, and cosmic chronometers data plus the local value of the Hubble parameter. We find that different neutrino mass hierarchies return similar fit on almost all model parameters and mildly change the dynamical dark energy properties.
  • We propose a new method to test modified gravity theories, taking advantage of the available data on extrasolar planets. We computed the deviations from the Kepler third law and use that to constrain gravity theories beyond General Relativity. We investigate gravity models which incorporate three screening mechanisms: the Chameleon, the Symmetron and the Vainshtein. We find that data from exoplanets orbits are very sensitive to the screening mechanisms putting strong constraints in the parameter space for the Chameleon models and the Symmetron, complementary and competitive to other methods, like interferometers and solar system. With the constraints on Vainshtein we are able to work beyond the hypothesis that the crossover scale is of the same order of magnitude than the Hubble radius $r_c \sim H_0^{-1}$, which makes the screening work automatically, testing how strong this hypothesis is and the viability of other scales.
  • We present exact kinematic consistency relations for cosmological structures that do not vanish at equal times and can thus be measured in surveys. These rely on cross-correlations between the density and velocity, or momentum, fields. Indeed, the uniform transport of small-scale structures by long wavelength modes, which cannot be detected at equal times by looking at density correlations only, gives rise to a shift in the amplitude of the velocity field that could be measured. These consistency relations only rely on the weak equivalence principle and Gaussian initial conditions. They remain valid in the non-linear regime and for biased galaxy fields. They can be used to constrain non-standard cosmological scenarios or the large-scale galaxy bias.
  • In this work we will test an alternative model of gravity belonging to the large family of galileon models. It is characterized by an intrinsic breaking of the Vainshtein mechanism inside large astrophysical objects, thus having possibly detectable observational signatures. We will compare theoretical predictions from this model with the observed total mass profile for a sample of clusters of galaxies. The profiles are derived using two complementary tools: X-ray hot intra-cluster gas dynamics, and strong and weak gravitational lensing. We find that a dependence with the dynamical internal status of each cluster is possible; for those clusters which are very close to be relaxed, and thus less perturbed by possible astrophysical local processes, the galileon model gives a quite good fit to both X-ray and lensing observations. Both masses and concentrations for the dark matter halos are consistent with earlier results found in numerical simulations and in the literature, and no compelling statistical evidence for a deviation from general relativity is detectable from the present observational state. Actually, the characteristic galileon parameter $\Upsilon$ is always consistent with zero, and only an upper limit ($\lesssim0.086$ at $1\sigma$, $\lesssim0.16$ at $2\sigma$, and $\lesssim0.23$ at $3\sigma$) can be established. Some interesting distinctive deviations might be operative, but the statistical validity of the results is far from strong, and better data would be needed in order to either confirm or reject a potential tension with general relativity.
  • In this work we study the dynamics of the Local Group (LG) within the context of cosmological models beyond General Relativity (GR). Using observable kinematic quantities to identify candidate pairs we build up samples of simulated LG-like objects drawing from $f(R)$, symmetron, DGP and quintessence N-body simulations together with their $\Lambda$CDM counterparts featuring the same initial random phase realisations. The variables and intervals used to define LG-like objects are referred to as Local Group model; different models are used throughout this work and adapted to study their dynamical and kinematic properties. The aim is to determine how well the observed LG-dynamics can be reproduced within cosmological theories beyond GR, We compute kinematic properties of samples drawn from alternative theories and $\Lambda$CDM and compare them to actual observations of the LG mass, velocity and position. As a consequence of the additional pull, pairwise tangential and radial velocities are enhanced in modified gravity and coupled dark energy with respect to $\Lambda$CDM, inducing significant changes to the total angular momentum and energy of the LG. For example, in models such as $f(R)$ and the symmetron this increase can be as large as $60\%$, peaking well outside of the $95\%$ confidence region allowed by the data. This shows how simple considerations about the LG dynamics can lead to clear small-scale observational signatures for alternative scenarios, without the need of expensive high-resolution simulations.
  • We use cosmological hydrodynamical simulations to study the effect of screened modified gravity models on the mass estimates of galaxy clusters. In particular, we focus on two novel aspects: (i) we study modified gravity models in which baryons and dark matter are coupled with different strengths to the scalar field, and, (ii) we put the simulation results into the greater context of a general screened-modified gravity parametrization. We have compared the mass of clusters inferred via lensing versus the mass inferred via kinematical measurements as a probe of violations of the equivalence principle at Mpc scales. We find that estimates of cluster masses via X-ray observations is mainly sensitive to the coupling between the scalar degree of freedom and baryons - while the kinematical mass is mainly sensitive to the coupling to dark matter. Therefore, the relation between the two mass estimates is a probe of a possible non-universal coupling between the scalar field, the standard model fields, and dark matter. Finally, we used observational data of kinetic, thermal and lensing masses to place constraints on deviations from general relativity on cluster scales for a general parametrization of screened modified gravity theories which contains $f(R)$ and Symmetron models. We find that while the kinematic mass can be used to place competitive constraints, using thermal measurements is challenging as a potential non-thermal contribution is degenerate with the imprint of modified gravity.
  • Modified gravity theories with a screening mechanism have acquired much interest recently in the quest for a viable alternative to General Relativity on cosmological scales, given their intrinsic property of being able to pass Solar System scale tests and, at the same time, to possibly drive universe acceleration on much larger scales. Here, we explore the possibility that the same screening mechanism, or its breaking at a certain astrophysical scale, might be responsible of those gravitational effects which, in the context of general relativity, are generally attributed to Dark Matter. We consider a recently proposed extension of covariant Galileon models in the so-called "beyond Horndeski" scenario, where a breaking of the Vainshtein mechanism is possible and, thus, some peculiar observational signatures should be detectable and make it distinguishable from general relativity. We apply this model to a sample of clusters of galaxies observed under the \textit{CLASH} survey, using both new data from gravitational lensing events and archival data from X-ray intra-cluster hot gas observations. In particular, we use the latter to model the gas density, and then use it as the only ingredient in the matter clusters' budget to calculate the expected lensing convergence map. Results show that, in the context of this extended Galileon, the assumption of having only gas and no Dark Matter at all in the clusters is able to match observations. We also obtain narrow and very interesting bounds on the parameters which characterize this model. In particular, we find that, at least for one of them, the general relativity limit is excluded at $2\sigma$ confidence level, thus making this model clearly statistically different and competitive with respect to general relativity.
  • Alternative theories of gravity typically invoke an environment-dependent screening mechanism to allow phenomenologically interesting deviations from general relativity (GR) to manifest on larger scales, while reducing to GR on small scales. The observation of the transition from screened to unscreened behavior would be compelling evidence for beyond-GR physics. We show that pairwise peculiar velocity statistics, in particular the relative radial velocity dispersion, $\sigma_\parallel$ , can be used to observe this transition when they are binned by some measure of halo environment. We established this by measuring the radial velocity dispersion between pairs of halos in N-body simulations for three $f(R)$ gravity and four symmetron models. We developed an estimator involving only line-of-sight velocities to show that this quantity is observable, and binned the results in halo mass, ambient density, and the isolatedness of halos. Ambient density is found to be the most relevant measure of environment; it is distinct from isolatedness, and correlates well with theoretical expectations for the symmetron model. By binning $\sigma_\parallel$ in ambient density, we find a strong environment-dependent signature for the symmetron models, with the velocities showing a clear transition from GR to non-GR behavior. No such transition is observed for $f(R)$, as the relevant scales are deep in the unscreened regime. Observations of the relative radial velocity dispersion in forthcoming peculiar velocity surveys, if binned appropriately by environment, therefore offer a valuable way of detecting the screening signature of modified gravity.
  • We use a spherical model and an extended excursion set formalism with drifting diffusive barriers to predict the abundance of cosmic voids in the context of general relativity as well as f(R) and symmetron models of modified gravity. We detect spherical voids from a suite of N-body simulations of these gravity theories and compare the measured void abundance to theory predictions. We find that our model correctly describes the abundance of both dark matter and galaxy voids, providing a better fit than previous proposals in the literature based on static barriers. We use the simulation abundance results to fit for the abundance model free parameters as a function of modified gravity parameters, and show that counts of dark matter voids can provide interesting constraints on modified gravity. For galaxy voids, more closely related to optical observations, we find that constraining modified gravity from void abundance alone may be significantly more challenging. In the context of current and upcoming galaxy surveys, the combination of void and halo statistics including their abundances, profiles and correlations should be effective in distinguishing modified gravity models that display different screening mechanisms.
  • We present measurements of the spatial clustering statistics in redshift space of various scalar field modified gravity simulations. We utilise the two-point and the three-point correlation functions to quantify the spatial distribution of dark matter halos within these simulations and thus discern between the models. We compare $\Lambda$CDM simulations to various modified gravity scenarios and find consistency with previous work in terms of 2-point statistics in real and redshift-space. However using higher order statistics such as the three-point correlation function in redshift space we find significant deviations from $\Lambda$CDM hinting that higher order statistics may prove to be a useful tool in the hunt for deviations from General Relativity.
  • Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2020 within the Cosmic Vision 2015 2025 program. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • We propose that the mass-temperature relation of galaxy clusters is a prime candidate for testing gravity theories beyond Einstein's general relativity, for modified gravity models with universal coupling between matter and the scalar field. For non-universally coupled models we discover that the impact of modified gravity can remain hidden from the mass-temperature relation. Using cosmological simulations, we find that in modified gravity the mass-temperature relation varies significantly from the standard gravity prediction of $M \propto T^{1.73}$. To be specific, for symmetron models with a coupling factor of $\beta=1$ we find a lower limit to the power law as $M\propto T^{1.6}$; and for f(R) gravity we compute predictions based on the model parameters. We show that the mass-temperature relation, for screened modified gravities, is significantly different from that of standard gravity for the less massive and colder galaxy clusters, while being indistinguishable from Einstein's gravity at massive, hot galaxy clusters. We further investigate the mass-temperature relation for other mass estimates than the thermal mass estimate, and discover that the gas mass-temperature results show an even more significant deviations from Einstein's gravity than the thermal mass-temperature.
  • We have investigated structure formation in the $\gamma$ gravity $f(R)$ model with {\it N}-body simulations. The $\gamma$ gravity model is a proposal which, unlike other viable $f(R)$ models, not only changes the gravitational dynamics, but can in principle also have signatures at the background level that are different from those obtained in $\Lambda$CDM (Cosmological constant, Cold Dark Matter). The aim of this paper is to study the nonlinear regime of the model in the case where, at late times, the background differs from $\Lambda$CDM. We quantify the signatures produced on the power spectrum, the halo mass function, and the density and velocity profiles. To appreciate the features of the model, we have compared it to $\Lambda$CDM and the Hu-Sawicki $f(R)$ models. For the considered set of parameters we find that the screening mechanism is ineffective, which gives rise to deviations in the halo mass function that disagree with observations. This does not rule out the model per se, but requires choices of parameters such that $|f_{R0}|$ is much smaller, which would imply that its cosmic expansion history cannot be distinguished from $\Lambda$CDM at the background level.
  • We investigate the propagation of scalar waves induced by matter sources in the context of scalar-tensor theories of gravity which include screening mechanisms for the scalar degree of freedom. The usual approach when studying these theories in the non-linear regime of cosmological perturbations is based on the assumption that scalar waves travel at the speed of light. Within General Relativity such approximation is good and leads to no loss of accuracy in the estimation of observables. We find, however, that mass terms and non-linearities in the equations of motion lead to propagation and dispersion velocities significantly different from the speed of light. As the group velocity is the one associated to the propagation of signals, a reduction of its value has direct impact on the behavior and dynamics of nonlinear structures within modified gravity theories with screening. For instance, the internal dynamics of galaxies and satellites submerged in large dark matter halos could be affected by the fact that the group velocity is smaller than the speed of light. It is therefore important, within such framework, to take into account the fact that different part of a galaxy will see changes in the environment at different times. A full non-static analysis may be necessary under those conditions.
  • In this paper we study the effects of letting the dark matter and the gas in the Universe couple to the scalar field of the symmetron model, a modified gravity theory, with varying coupling strength. We also search for a way to distinguish between universal and non-universal couplings in observations. The research is performed utilising a series of hydrodynamic, cosmological N-Body simulations, studying the resulting power spectra and galaxy halo properties, such as the density and temperature profiles. Results show that in the cases of universal couplings, the deviations in the baryon fraction from $\Lambda$CDM are smaller than in the cases of non-universal couplings throughout the halos. The same is apparent in the power spectrum baryon bias, defined as the ratio of gas to dark matter power spectrum. Deviations of the density profiles and power spectra from the $\Lambda$CDM reference values can differ significantly between dark matter and gas because the dark matter deviations are mostly larger than the deviations in the gas.
  • Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2019 within the Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 programme. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the Universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the Universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • Modified gravity models require a screening mechanism to be able to evade the stringent constraints from local gravity experiments and, at the same time, give rise to observable astrophysical and cosmological signatures. Such screened modified gravity models necessarily have dynamics determined by complex nonlinear equations that usually need to be solved on a model-by-model basis to produce predictions. This makes testing them a cumbersome process. In this paper, we investigate whether there is a common signature for all the different models that is suitable to testing them on cluster scales. To do this we propose an observable related to the fifth force, which can be observationally related to the ratio of dynamical-to-lensing mass of a halo, and then show that the predictions for this observable can be rescaled to a near universal form for a large class of modified gravity models. We demonstrate this using the Hu-Sawicki $f(R)$, the Symmetron, the nDGP, and the Dilaton models, as well as unifying parametrizations. The universal form is determined by only three quantities: a strength, a mass, and a width parameter. We also show how these parameters can be derived from a specific theory. This self-similarity in the predictions can hopefully be used to search for signatures of modified gravity on cluster scales in a model-independent way.