• Ionic liquid gating has a number of advantages over solid-state gating, especially for flexible or transparent devices and for applications requiring high carrier densities. However, the large number of charged ions near the channel inevitably results in Coulomb scattering, which limits the carrier mobility in otherwise clean systems. We develop a model for this Coulomb scattering. We validate our model experimentally using ionic liquid gating of graphene across varying thicknesses of hexagonal boron nitride, demonstrating that disorder in the bulk ionic liquid often dominates the scattering.
  • Crystal truncation rods are used to study surface and interface structure. Since real surfaces are always somewhat miscut from a low index plane, it is important to study the effect of miscut on crystal truncation rods. We develop a model that describes the truncation rod scattering from miscut surfaces that have steps and terraces. We show that non-uniform terrace widths and jagged step edges are both forms of roughness that decrease the intensity of the rods. Non-uniform terrace widths also result in a broad peak that overlaps the rods. We use our model to characterize the terrace width distribution and step edge jaggedness on three SrTiO$_3$ (001) samples, showing excellent agreement between the model and the data, confirmed by atomic force micrographs of the surface morphology. We expect our description of terrace roughness will apply to many surfaces, even those without obvious terracing.
  • Ballistic electrons in solids can have mean free paths far larger than the smallest features patterned by lithography. This has allowed development and study of solid-state electron-optical devices such as beam splitters and quantum point contacts, which have informed our understanding of electron flow and interactions. Recently, high-mobility graphene has emerged as an ideal two-dimensional semimetal that hosts unique chiral electron-optical effects due to its honeycomb crystalline lattice. However, this chiral transport prevents simple use of electrostatic gates to define electron-optical devices in graphene. Here, we present a method of creating highly-collimated electron beams in graphene based on collinear pairs of slits, with absorptive sidewalls between the slits. By this method, we achieve beams with angular width 18 degrees or narrower, and transmission matching semiclassical predictions.
  • We report simultaneous transport and scanning microwave impedance microscopy to examine the correlation between transport quantization and filling of the bulk Landau levels in the quantum Hall regime in gated graphene devices. Surprisingly, a comparison of these measurements reveals that quantized transport typically occurs below the complete filling of bulk Landau levels, when the bulk is still conductive. This result points to a revised understanding of transport quantization when carriers are accumulated by gating. We discuss the implications on transport study of the quantum Hall effect in graphene and related topological states in other two-dimensional electron systems.
  • One prominent structural feature of ionic liquids near surfaces is formation of alternating layers of anions and cations. However, how this layering responds to applied potential is poorly understood. We focus on the structure of 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium tris(pentafluoroethyl) trifluorophosphate (BMPY-FAP) near the surface of a strontium titanate (SrTiO$_3$) electric double-layer transistor. Using x-ray reflectivity, we show that at positive bias, the individual layers in the ionic liquid double layer thicken and the layering persists further away from the interface. We model the reflectivity using a modified distorted crystal model with alternating cation and anion layers, which allows us to extract the charge density and the potential near the surface. We find that the charge density is strongly oscillatory with and without applied potential, and that with applied gate bias of 4.5 V the first two layers become significantly more cation rich than at zero bias, accumulating about $2.5 \times 10^{13}$ cm$^{-2}$ excess charge density.
  • Electrolyte gating using ionic liquid electrolytes has recently generated considerable interest as a method to achieve large carrier density modulations in a variety of materials. In noble metal thin films, electrolyte gating results in large changes in sheet resistance. The widely accepted mechanism for these changes is the formation of an electric double layer with a charged layer of ions in the liquid and accumulation or depletion of carriers in the thin film. We report here a different mechanism. In particular, we show using x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) that the previously reported large conductance modulation in gold films is due to reversible oxidation and reduction of the surface rather than the charging of an electric double layer. We show that the double layer capacitance accounts for less than 10\% of the observed change in transport properties. These results represent a significant step towards understanding the mechanisms involved in electrolyte gating.
  • Rational design of artificial lattices yields effects unavailable in simple solids, and vertical superlattices of multilayer semiconductors are already used in optical sensors and emitters. Manufacturing lateral superlattices remains a much bigger challenge, with new opportunities offered by the use of moire patterns in van der Waals heterostructures of graphene and hexagonal crystals such as boron nitride (h-BN). Experiments to date have elucidated the novel electronic structure of highly aligned graphene/h-BN heterostructures, where miniband edges and saddle points in the electronic dispersion can be reached by electrostatic gating. Here we investigate the dynamics of electrons in moire minibands by transverse electron focusing, a measurement of ballistic transport between adjacent local contacts in a magnetic field. At low temperatures, we observe caustics of skipping orbits extending over hundreds of superlattice periods, reversals of the cyclotron revolution for successive minibands, and breakdown of cyclotron motion near van Hove singularities. At high temperatures, we study the suppression of electron focusing by inelastic scattering.
  • The fractional quantum Hall (FQH) effect is a canonical example of electron-electron interactions producing new ground states in many-body systems. Most FQH studies have focused on the lowest Landau level (LL), whose fractional states are successfully explained by the composite fermion (CF) model, in which an even number of magnetic flux quanta are attached to an electron and where states form the sequence of filling factors $\nu = p/(2mp \pm 1)$, with $m$ and $p$ positive integers. In the widely-studied GaAs-based system, the CF picture is thought to become unstable for the $N \geq 2$ LL, where larger residual interactions between CFs are predicted and competing many-body phases have been observed. Here we report transport measurements of FQH states in the $N=2$ LL (filling factors $4 < \nu < 8$) in bilayer graphene, a system with spin and valley degrees of freedom in all LLs, and an additional orbital degeneracy in the 8-fold degenerate $N=0$/$N=1$ LLs. In contrast with recent observations of particle-hole asymmetry in the $N=0$/$N=1$ LLs of bilayer graphene, the FQH states we observe in the $N=2$ LL are consistent with the CF model: within a LL, they form a complete sequence of particle-hole symmetric states whose relative strength is dependent on their denominators. The FQH states in the $N=2$ LL display energy gaps of a few Kelvin, comparable to and in some cases larger than those of fractional states in the $N=0$/$N=1$ LLs. The FQH states we observe form, to the best of our knowledge, the highest set of particle-hole symmetric pairs seen in any material system.
  • Graphene monolayers are known to display domains of anisotropic friction with twofold symmetry and anisotropy exceeding 200 percent. This anisotropy has been thought to originate from periodic nanoscale ripples in the graphene sheet, which enhance puckering around a sliding asperity to a degree determined by the sliding direction. Here we demonstrate that these frictional domains derive not from structural features in the graphene, but from self-assembly of atmospheric adsorbates into a highly regular superlattice of stripes with period 4 to 6 nm. The stripes and resulting frictional domains appear on monolayer and multilayer graphene on a variety of substrates, as well as on exfoliated flakes of hexagonal boron nitride. We show that the stripe-superlattices can be reproducibly and reversibly manipulated with submicron precision using a scanning probe microscope, allowing us to create arbitrary arrangements of frictional domains within a single flake. Our results suggest a revised understanding of the anisotropic friction observed in graphene and bulk graphite in terms of atmospheric adsorbates.
  • The realization of quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect in HgTe quantum wells (QWs) is considered a milestone in the discovery of topological insulators. The QSH edge states are predicted to allow current to flow at the edges of an insulating bulk, as demonstrated in various experiments. A key prediction of QSH theory that remains to be experimentally verified is the breakdown of the edge conduction under broken time reversal symmetry (TRS). Here we first establish a rigorous framework for understanding the magnetic field dependence of electrostatically gated QSH devices. We then report unexpected edge conduction under broken TRS, using a unique cryogenic microwave impedance microscopy (MIM), on a 7.5 nm HgTe QW device with an inverted band structure. At zero magnetic field and low carrier densities, clear edge conduction is observed in the local conductivity profile of this device but not in the 5.5 nm control device whose band structure is trivial. Surprisingly, the edge conduction in the 7.5 nm device persists up to 9 T with little effect from the magnetic field. This indicates physics beyond simple QSH models, possibly associated with material- specific properties, other symmetry protection and/or electron-electron interactions.
  • Electrolyte gating is a powerful technique for accumulating large carrier densities in surface two-dimensional electron systems (2DES). Yet this approach suffers from significant sources of disorder: electrochemical reactions can damage or alter the surface of interest, and the ions of the electrolyte and various dissolved contaminants sit Angstroms from the 2DES. Accordingly, electrolyte gating is well-suited to studies of superconductivity and other phenomena robust to disorder, but of limited use when reactions or disorder must be avoided. Here we demonstrate that these limitations can be overcome by protecting the sample with a chemically inert, atomically smooth sheet of hexagonal boron nitride (BN). We illustrate our technique with electrolyte-gated strontium titanate, whose mobility improves more than tenfold when protected with BN. We find this improvement even for our thinnest BN, of measured thickness 6 A, with which we can accumulate electron densities nearing 10^14 cm^-2. Our technique is portable to other materials, and should enable future studies where high carrier density modulation is required but electrochemical reactions and surface disorder must be minimized.
  • Correlated electron states in high mobility two-dimensional electron systems (2DESs), including charge density waves and microemulsion phases intermediate between a Fermi liquid and Wigner crystal, are predicted to exhibit complex local charge order. Existing experimental studies, however, have mainly probed these systems at micron to millimeter scales rather than directly mapping spatial organization. Scanning probes should be well-suited to study the spatial structure of these states, but high mobility 2DESs are found at buried semiconductor interfaces, beyond the reach of conventional scanning tunneling microscopy. Scanning techniques based on electrostatic coupling to the 2DES deliver important insights, but generally with resolution limited by the depth of the 2DES. In this Letter, we present our progress in developing a technique called "virtual scanning tunneling microscopy" that allows local tunneling into a high mobility 2DES. Using a specially-designed bilayer GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure where the tunnel coupling between two separate 2DESs is tunable via electrostatic gating, combined with a scanning gate, we show that the local tunneling can be controlled with sub-200 nm resolution.
  • We report low-temperature magnetoconductance measurements of a patterned two-dimensional electron system (2DES) at the surface of strontium titanate, gated by an ionic liquid electrolyte. We observe universal conductance fluctuations, a signature of phase-coherent transport in mesoscopic devices. From the universal conductance fluctuations we extract an electron dephasing rate linear in temperature, characteristic of electron-electron interaction in a disordered conductor. Furthermore, the dephasing rate has a temperature-independent offset, suggestive of unscreened local magnetic moments in the sample.
  • The quantum spin Hall (QSH) state is a genuinely new state of matter characterized by a non-trivial topology of its band structure. Its key feature is conducting edge channels whose spin polarization has potential for spintronic and quantum information applications. The QSH state was predicted and experimentally demonstrated to exist in HgTe quantum wells. The existence of the edge channels has been inferred from the fact that local and non-local conductance values in sufficiently small devices are close to the quantized values expected for ideal edge channels and from signatures of the spin polarization. The robustness of the edge channels in larger devices and the interplay between the edge channels and a conducting bulk are relatively unexplored experimentally, and are difficult to assess via transport measurements. Here we image the current in large Hallbars made from HgTe quantum wells by probing the magnetic field generated by the current using a scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). We observe that the current flows along the edge of the device in the QSH regime, and furthermore that an identifiable edge channel exists even in the presence of disorder and considerable bulk conduction as the device is gated or its temperature is raised. Our results represent a versatile method for the characterization of new quantum spin Hall materials systems, and confirm both the existence and the robustness of the predicted edge channels.
  • We report on our design of a scanning gate microscope housed in a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator with a base temperature of 15 mK. The recent increase in efficiency of pulse tube cryocoolers has made cryogen-free systems popular in recent years. However, this new style of cryostat presents challenges for performing scanning probe measurements, mainly as a result of the vibrations introduced by the cryocooler. We demonstrate scanning with root-mean-square vibrations of 0.8 nm at 3 K and 2.1 nm at 15 mK in a 1 kHz bandwidth with our design.
  • The discovery of the Quantum Spin Hall state, and topological insulators in general, has sparked strong experimental efforts. Transport studies of the Quantum Spin Hall state confirmed the presence of edge states, showed ballistic edge transport in micron-sized samples and demonstrated the spin polarization of the helical edge states. While these experiments have confirmed the broad theoretical model, the properties of the QSH edge states have not yet been investigated on a local scale. Using Scanning Gate Microscopy to perturb the QSH edge states on a sub-micron scale, we identify well-localized scattering sites which likely limit the expected non-dissipative transport in the helical edge channels. In the micron-sized regions between the scattering sites, the edge states appear to propagate unperturbed as expected for an ideal QSH system and are found to be robust against weak induced potential fluctuations.
  • We study the coherent properties of transmission through Kondo impurities, by considering an open Aharonov-Bohm ring with an embedded quantum dot. We develop a novel many-body scattering theory which enables us to calculate the conductance through the dot, the transmission phase shift, and the normalized visibility, in terms of the single-particle T-matrix. For the single-channel Kondo effect, we find at temperatures much below the Kondo temperature $T_K$ that the transmission phase shift is \pi/2 without any corrections up to order (T/T_K)^2. The visibility has the form 1-(\pi T/T_K)^2. For the non-Fermi liquid fixed point of the two channel Kondo, we find that transmission phase shift is \pi/2 despite the fact that a scattering phase shift is not defined. At zero temperature the visibility is 1/2, thus at zero temperature exactly half of the conductance is carried by single-particle processes. We explain that the spin summation masks the inherent scattering phases of the dot, which can be accessed only via a spin-resolved experiment. In addition, we calculate the effect of magnetic field and channel anisotropy, and generalize to the k-channel Kondo case.
  • We report on the magnetotransport properties of a prototype Mott insulator/band insulator perovskite heterojunction in magnetic fields up to 31 T and at temperatures between 360 mK and 10 K. Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations in the magnetoresistance are observed. The oscillations are two-dimensional in nature and are interpreted as arising from either a single, spin-split subband or two subbands. In either case, the electron system that gives rise to the oscillations represents only a fraction of the electrons in the space charge layer at the interface. The temperature dependence of the oscillations are used to extract an effective mass of ~ 1 me for the subband(s). The results are discussed in the context of the t2g-states that form the bottom of the conduction band of SrTiO3.
  • Magnetotransport and superconducting properties are investigated for uniformly La-doped SrTiO3 films and GdTiO3/SrTiO3 heterostructures, respectively. GdTiO3/SrTiO3 interfaces exhibit a high-density two-dimensional electron gas on the SrTiO3-side of the interface, while for the SrTiO3 films carriers are provided by the dopant atoms. Both types of samples exhibit ferromagnetism at low temperatures, as evidenced by a hysteresis in the magnetoresistance. For the uniformly doped SrTiO3 films, the Curie temperature is found to increase with doping and to coexist with superconductivity for carrier concentrations on the high-density side of the superconducting dome. The Curie temperature of the GdTiO3/SrTiO3 heterostructures scales with the thickness of the SrTiO3 quantum well. The results are used to construct a stability diagram for the ferromagnetic and superconducting phases of SrTiO3.
  • We report on a comprehensive study of spin-1/2 Kondo effect in a strongly-coupled quantum dot realized in a high-quality InAs nanowire. The nanowire quantum dot is relatively symmetrically coupled to its two leads, so the Kondo effect reaches the Unitary limit. The measured Kondo conductance demonstrates scaling with temperature, Zeeman magnetic field, and out-of-equilibrium bias. The suppression of the Kondo conductance with magnetic field is much stronger than would be expected based on a g-factor extracted from Zeeman splitting of the Kondo peak. This may be related to strong spin-orbit coupling in InAs.
  • We demonstrate a mechanism for a dual layer, vertical field-effect transistor, in which nearly-depleting one layer will extend its wavefunction to overlap the other layer and increase tunnel current. We characterize this effect in a specially designed GaAs/AlGaAs device, observing a tunnel current increase of two orders of magnitude at cryogenic temperatures, and we suggest extrapolations of the design to other material systems such as graphene.
  • We study a theoretical model of virtual scanning tunneling microscopy (VSTM), a proposed application of interlayer tunneling in a bilayer system to locally probe a two-dimensional electron system (2DES) in a semiconductor heterostructure. We consider tunneling for the case where transport in the 2DESs is ballistic, and show that the zero-bias anomaly is suppressed by extremely efficient screening. Since such an anomaly would complicate the interpretation of data from a VSTM, this result is encouraging for efforts to implement such a microscopy technique.
  • We have developed a highly-sensitive integrated capacitance bridge for quantum capacitance measurements. Our bridge, based on a GaAs HEMT amplifier, delivers attofarad (aF) resolution using a small AC excitation at or below kT over a broad temperature range (4K-300K). We have achieved a resolution at room temperature of 10aF per root Hz for a 10mV AC excitation at 17.5 kHz, with improved resolution at cryogenic temperatures, for the same excitation amplitude. We demonstrate the performance of our capacitance bridge by measuring the quantum capacitance of top-gated graphene devices and comparing against results obtained with the highest resolution commercially-available capacitance measurement bridge. Under identical test conditions, our bridge exceeds the resolution of the commercial tool by up to several orders of magnitude.
  • We propose a novel probe technique capable of performing local low-temperature spectroscopy on a 2D electron system (2DES) in a semiconductor heterostructure. Motivated by predicted spatially-structured electron phases, the probe uses a charged metal tip to induce electrons to tunnel locally, directly below the tip, from a "probe" 2DES to a "subject" 2DES of interest. We test this concept with large-area (non-scanning) tunneling measurements, and predict a high spatial resolution and spectroscopic capability, with minimal influence on the physics in the subject 2DES.
  • A simple surface band structure and a large bulk band gap have allowed Bi2Se3 to become a reference material for the newly discovered three-dimensional topological insulators, which exhibit topologically-protected conducting surface states that reside inside the bulk band gap. Studying topological insulators such as Bi2Se3 in nanostructures is advantageous because of the high surface-to-volume ratio, which enhances effects from the surface states; recently reported Aharonov-Bohm oscillation in topological insulator nanoribbons by some of us is a good example. Theoretically, introducing magnetic impurities in topological insulators is predicted to open a small gap in the surface states by breaking time-reversal symmetry. Here, we present synthesis of magnetically-doped Bi2Se3 nanoribbons by vapor-liquid-solid growth using magnetic metal thin films as catalysts. Although the doping concentration is less than ~ 2%, low-temperature transport measurements of the Fe-doped Bi2Se3 nanoribbon devices show a clear Kondo effect at temperatures below 30 K, confirming the presence of magnetic impurities in the Bi2Se3 nanoribbons. The capability to dope topological insulator nanostructures magnetically opens up exciting opportunities for spintronics.