• We present results from a new incoherent-beam Fast Radio Burst (FRB) search on the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) Pathfinder. Its large instantaneous field of view (FoV) and relative thermal insensitivity allow us to probe the ultra-bright tail of the FRB distribution, and to test a recent claim that this distribution's slope, $\alpha\equiv-\frac{\partial \log N}{\partial \log S}$, is quite small. A 256-input incoherent beamformer was deployed on the CHIME Pathfinder for this purpose. If the FRB distribution were described by a single power-law with $\alpha=0.7$, we would expect an FRB detection every few days, making this the fastest survey on sky at present. We collected 1268 hours of data, amounting to one of the largest exposures of any FRB survey, with over 2.4\,$\times$\,10$^5$\,deg$^2$\,hrs. Having seen no bursts, we have constrained the rate of extremely bright events to $<\!13$\,sky$^{-1}$\,day$^{-1}$ above $\sim$\,220$\sqrt{(\tau/\rm ms)}$ Jy\,ms for $\tau$ between 1.3 and 100\,ms, at 400--800\,MHz. The non-detection also allows us to rule out $\alpha\lesssim0.9$ with 95$\%$ confidence, after marginalizing over uncertainties in the GBT rate at 700--900\,MHz, though we show that for a cosmological population and a large dynamic range in flux density, $\alpha$ is brightness-dependent. Since FRBs now extend to large enough distances that non-Euclidean effects are significant, there is still expected to be a dearth of faint events and relative excess of bright events. Nevertheless we have constrained the allowed number of ultra-intense FRBs. While this does not have significant implications for deeper, large-FoV surveys like full CHIME and APERTIF, it does have important consequences for other wide-field, small dish experiments.
  • The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) Pathfinder radio telescope is currently surveying the northern hemisphere between 400 and 800 MHz. By mapping the large scale structure of neutral hydrogen through its redshifted 21 cm line emission between $z \sim 0.8-2.5$ CHIME will contribute to our understanding of Dark Energy. Bright astrophysical foregrounds must be separated from the neutral hydrogen signal, a task which requires precise characterization of the polarized telescope beams. Using the DRAO John A. Galt 26 m telescope, we have developed a holography instrument and technique for mapping the CHIME Pathfinder beams. We report the status of the instrument and initial results of this effort.
  • We present a procedure for efficiently compressing astronomical radio data for high performance applications. Integrated, post-correlation data are first passed through a nearly lossless rounding step which compares the precision of the data to a generalized and calibration-independent form of the radiometer equation. This allows the precision of the data to be reduced in a way that has an insignificant impact on the data. The newly developed Bitshuffle lossless compression algorithm is subsequently applied. When the algorithm is used in conjunction with the HDF5 library and data format, data produced by the CHIME Pathfinder telescope is compressed to 28% of its original size and decompression throughputs in excess of 1 GB/s are obtained on a single core.
  • The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) is a transit interferometer currently being built at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory (DRAO) in Penticton, BC, Canada. We will use CHIME to map neutral hydrogen in the frequency range 400 -- 800\,MHz over half of the sky, producing a measurement of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) at redshifts between 0.8 -- 2.5 to probe dark energy. We have deployed a pathfinder version of CHIME that will yield constraints on the BAO power spectrum and provide a test-bed for our calibration scheme. I will discuss the CHIME calibration requirements and describe instrumentation we are developing to meet these requirements.
  • A pathfinder version of CHIME (the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment) is currently being commissioned at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory (DRAO) in Penticton, BC. The instrument is a hybrid cylindrical interferometer designed to measure the large scale neutral hydrogen power spectrum across the redshift range 0.8 to 2.5. The power spectrum will be used to measure the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) scale across this poorly probed redshift range where dark energy becomes a significant contributor to the evolution of the Universe. The instrument revives the cylinder design in radio astronomy with a wide field survey as a primary goal. Modern low-noise amplifiers and digital processing remove the necessity for the analog beamforming that characterized previous designs. The Pathfinder consists of two cylinders 37\,m long by 20\,m wide oriented north-south for a total collecting area of 1,500 square meters. The cylinders are stationary with no moving parts, and form a transit instrument with an instantaneous field of view of $\sim$100\,degrees by 1-2\,degrees. Each CHIME Pathfinder cylinder has a feedline with 64 dual polarization feeds placed every $\sim$30\,cm which Nyquist sample the north-south sky over much of the frequency band. The signals from each dual-polarization feed are independently amplified, filtered to 400-800\,MHz, and directly sampled at 800\,MSps using 8 bits. The correlator is an FX design, where the Fourier transform channelization is performed in FPGAs, which are interfaced to a set of GPUs that compute the correlation matrix. The CHIME Pathfinder is a 1/10th scale prototype version of CHIME and is designed to detect the BAO feature and constrain the distance-redshift relation.
  • Gamma-ray astronomy at energies in excess of 100 GeV is carried out using arrays of imaging Cherenkov telescopes. Each telescope comprises a large reflector, of order 10 m diameter, made of many mirror facets, and a camera consisting of a matrix of photomultiplier pixels. Differences in the total throughput between nominally identical telescopes, due to aging of the mirrors and PMTs and other effects, should be monitored to reduce possible systematic errors. One way to directly measure the throughput of such telescopes is to track bright stars and measure the photocurrents produced by their light falling on camera pixels. We have developed such a procedure using the four telescopes in the VERITAS array. We note the technique is general, however, and could be applied to other imaging Cherenkov experiments. For this measurement, a raster scan is performed on a single star such that its image is swept across the central pixels in the camera, thus providing a statistically robust set of measurements in a short period of time to reduce time-dependent effects on the throughput. Photocurrents are measured using the starlight-induced baseline fluctuations of the pixel outputs, as recorded by the standard readout electronics. In this contribution we describe details of the procedure and report on feasibility studies carried out during the 2012-2013 observing season.
  • The VERITAS array is a set of four imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs) sensitive to gamma rays at energies between 85 GeV and 30 TeV. Each telescope is based on a tessellated mirror, 12 metres in diameter, which reflects light from a gamma-ray-induced air shower to form an image on a pixellated `camera' comprising 499 photomultiplier tubes. The image brightness is the primary measure of the gamma ray's energy so a knowledge of the mirror reflectivity is important. We describe here a method, pioneered by members of the MAGIC collaboration, to measure the whole-dish reflectivity, quickly and regularly, so that effects of aging can be monitored. A CCD camera attached near the centre of the dish simultaneously acquires an image of both a target star and its reflection on a target of Spectralon, a highly-reflective material, placed at the focus of the telescope. The ratio of their brightnesses, as recorded by the CCD, along with geometric factors, provides an estimate of the dish reflectivity with few systematic errors. A filter wheel is placed in front of the CCD camera, allowing to measure the reflectivity as a function of wavelength. We present initial results obtained with the VERITAS telescopes during 2012.
  • In this white paper, submitted as a part of Snowmass 2013 (subgroup CF2), we examine the current status and future prospects of the VERITAS indirect dark matter detection program. The VERITAS array of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs), sensitive in the 0.1-50 TeV regime, is in the process of completing a multi-year program aimed at detecting signatures of neutralino dark matter. This program is spread out over a range of astrophysical targets which can potentially yield definitive signatures of neutralino self-annihilation such as dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) and the center of the Milky Way galaxy. While the program is still in progress, initial results on dSphs have produced very competitive upper limits on the thermally averaged cross-section of neutralino self-annihilation as well as strongly constraining leptophillic dark matter models (such as those inferred from the PAMELA and AMS positron fraction results). As the program continues over the next 5 years, VERITAS observations will yield some of the strongest constraints available from IACTs, pushing down the limit on the thermally averaged cross-section of neutralino self-annihilation to the expected natural thermal relic scale.
  • Astronomical transients are intrinsically interesting things to study. Fast optical transients (microsecond timescale) are a largely unexplored field of optical astronomy mainly due to the fact that large optical telescopes are oversubscribed. Furthermore, most optical observations use instruments with integration times on the order of seconds and are thus unable to resolve fast transients. Current-generation atmospheric Cherenkov gamma-ray telescopes, however, have huge collecting areas (e.g., VERITAS, which consists of four 12-m telescopes), larger than any existing optical telescopes, and time is typically available for such studies without interfering with gamma-ray observations. The following outlines the benefits of using a Cherenkov telescope to detect optical transients and the implementation of the VERITAS Transient Detector (TRenDy), a dedicated multi-channel photometer based on field-programmable gate arrays. Data are presented demonstrating the ability of TRenDy to detect transient events such as a star passing through its field of view and the optical light curve of a pulsar.
  • VERITAS is an array of four identical telescopes designed for detecting and measuring astrophysical gamma rays with energies in excess of 100 GeV. Each telescope uses a 12 m diameter reflector to collect Cherenkov light from air showers initiated by incident gamma rays and direct it onto a `camera' comprising 499 photomultiplier tubes read out by flash ADCs. We describe here calibration methods used for determining the values of the parameters which are necessary for converting the digitized PMT pulses to gamma-ray energies and directions. Use of laser pulses to determine and monitor PMT gains is discussed, as are measurements of the absolute throughput of the telescopes using muon rings.
  • We report on the fabrication of what we believe is the first example of a two dimensional nonlinear periodic crystal\cite{berger}, where the refractive index is constant but in which the 2nd order nonlinear susceptibility is spatially periodic. Such a crystal allows for efficient quasi-phase matched 2nd harmonic generation using multiple reciprocal lattice vectors of the crystal lattice. External 2nd harmonic conversion efficiencies > 60% were measured with picosecond pulses. The 2nd harmonic light can be simultaneously phase matched by multiple reciprocal lattice vectors, resulting in the generation of multiple coherent beams. The fabrication technique is extremely versatile and allows for the fabrication of a broad range of 2-D crystals including quasi-crystals.