• This article considers variational approximations of the posterior distribution in a high-dimensional state space model. The variational approximation is a multivariate Gaussian density, in which the variational parameters to be optimized are a mean vector and a covariance matrix. The number of parameters in the covariance matrix grows as the square of the number of model parameters, so it is necessary to find simple yet effective parametrizations of the covariance structure when the number of model parameters is large. The joint posterior distribution over the high-dimensional state vectors is approximated using a dynamic factor model, with Markovian dependence in time and a factor covariance structure for the states. This gives a reduced dimension description of the dependence structure for the states, as well as a temporal conditional independence structure similar to that in the true posterior. We illustrate our approach in two high-dimensional applications which are challenging for Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling. The first is a spatio-temporal model for the spread of the Eurasian Collared-Dove across North America. The second is a multivariate stochastic volatility model for financial returns via a Wishart process.
  • We consider the problem of learning a Gaussian variational approximation to the posterior distribution for a high-dimensional parameter, where we impose sparsity in the precision matrix to reflect appropriate conditional independence structure in the model. Incorporating sparsity in the precision matrix allows the Gaussian variational distribution to be both flexible and parsimonious, and the sparsity is achieved through parameterization in terms of the Cholesky factor. Efficient stochastic gradient methods which make appropriate use of gradient information for the target distribution are developed for the optimization. We consider alternative estimators of the stochastic gradients which have lower variation and are more stable. Our approach is illustrated using generalized linear mixed models and state space models for time series.
  • It can be important in Bayesian analyses of complex models to construct informative prior distributions which reflect knowledge external to the data at hand. Nevertheless, how much prior information an analyst is able to elicit from an expert for use in prior construction will be limited for practical reasons, with checks for model adequacy and prior-data conflict an essential part of the process of model building and sensitivity analysis. This paper develops effective numerical methods for exploring reasonable choices of a prior distribution from a parametric class, when prior information is specified in the form of some limited constraints on prior predictive distributions, and where these prior predictive distributions are analytically intractable. The methods developed may be thought of as a novel application of the ideas of history matching, a technique developed in the literature on assessment of computer models. We illustrate the approach in the context of logistic regression and sparse signal shrinkage prior distributions for high-dimensional linear models.
  • Variational approximation methods have proven to be useful for scaling Bayesian computations to large data sets and highly parametrized models. Applying variational methods involves solving an optimization problem, and recent research in this area has focused on stochastic gradient ascent methods as a general approach to implementation. Here variational approximation is considered for a posterior distribution in high dimensions using a Gaussian approximating family. Gaussian variational approximation with an unrestricted covariance matrix can be computationally burdensome in many problems because the number of elements in the covariance matrix increases quadratically with the dimension of the model parameter. To circumvent this problem, low-dimensional factor covariance structures are considered. General stochastic gradient approaches to efficiently perform the optimization are described, with gradient estimates obtained using the so-called "reparametrization trick". The end result is a flexible and efficient approach to high-dimensional Gaussian variational approximation, which we illustrate using eight real datasets.
  • When using complex Bayesian models to combine information, the checking for consistency of the information being combined is good statistical practice. Here a new method is developed for detecting prior-data conflicts in Bayesian models based on comparing the observed value of a prior to posterior divergence to its distribution under the prior predictive distribution for the data. The divergence measure used in our model check is a measure of how much beliefs have changed from prior to posterior, and can be thought of as a measure of the overall size of a relative belief function. It is shown that the proposed method is intuitive, has desirable properties, can be extended to hierarchical settings, and is related asymptotically to Jeffreys' and reference prior distributions. In the case where calculations are difficult, the use of variational approximations as a way of relieving the computational burden is suggested. The methods are compared in a number of examples with an alternative but closely related approach in the literature based on the prior predictive distribution of a minimal sufficient statistic.
  • Synthetic likelihood is an attractive approach to likelihood-free inference when an approximately Gaussian summary statistic for the data, informative for inference about the parameters, is available. The synthetic likelihood method derives an approximate likelihood function from a plug-in normal density estimate for the summary statistic, with plug-in mean and covariance matrix obtained by Monte Carlo simulation from the model. In this article, we develop alternatives to Markov chain Monte Carlo implementations of Bayesian synthetic likelihoods with reduced computational overheads. Our approach uses stochastic gradient variational inference methods for posterior approximation in the synthetic likelihood context, employing unbiased estimates of the log likelihood. We compare the new method with a related likelihood free variational inference technique in the literature, while at the same time improving the implementation of that approach in a number of ways. These new algorithms are feasible to implement in situations which are challenging for conventional approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) methods, in terms of the dimensionality of the parameter and summary statistic.
  • Variational Bayes (VB) is rapidly becoming a popular tool for Bayesian inference in statistical modeling. However, the existing VB algorithms are restricted to cases where the likelihood is tractable, which precludes the use of VB in many interesting situations such as in state space models and in approximate Bayesian computation (ABC), where application of VB methods was previously impossible. This paper extends the scope of application of VB to cases where the likelihood is intractable, but can be estimated unbiasedly. The proposed VB method therefore makes it possible to carry out Bayesian inference in many statistical applications, including state space models and ABC. The method is generic in the sense that it can be applied to almost all statistical models without requiring too much model-based derivation, which is a drawback of many existing VB algorithms. We also show how the proposed method can be used to obtain highly accurate VB approximations of marginal posterior distributions.
  • Approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) refers to a family of inference methods used in the Bayesian analysis of complex models where evaluation of the likelihood is difficult. Conventional ABC methods often suffer from the curse of dimensionality, and a marginal adjustment strategy was recently introduced in the literature to improve the performance of ABC algorithms in high-dimensional problems. The marginal adjustment approach is extended using a Gaussian copula approximation. The method first estimates the bivariate posterior for each pair of parameters separately using a 2-dimensional Gaussian copula, and then combines these estimates together to estimate the joint posterior. The approximation works well in large sample settings when the posterior is approximately normal, but also works well in many cases which are far from that situation due to the nonparametric estimation of the marginal posterior distributions. If each bivariate posterior distribution can be well estimated with a low-dimensional ABC analysis then this Gaussian copula method can extend ABC methods to problems of high dimension. The method also results in an analytic expression for the approximate posterior which is useful for many purposes such as approximation of the likelihood itself. This method is illustrated with several examples.
  • Flexible regression methods where interest centres on the way that the whole distribution of a response vector changes with covariates are very useful in some applications. A recently developed technique in this regard uses the matrix-variate Dirichlet process as a prior for a mixing distribution on a coefficient in a multivariate linear regression model. The method is attractive, particularly in the multivariate setting, for the convenient way that it allows for borrowing strength across different component regressions and for its computational simplicity and tractability. The purpose of the present article is to develop fast online variational Bayes approaches to fitting this model and to investigate how they perform compared to MCMC and batch variational methods in a number of scenarios.
  • Sliced Sudoku-based space-filling designs and, more generally, quasi-sliced orthogonal array-based space-filling designs are useful experimental designs in several contexts, including computer experiments with categorical in addition to quantitative inputs and cross-validation. Here, we provide a straightforward construction of doubly orthogonal quasi-Sudoku Latin squares which can be used to generate sliced space-filling designs which achieve uniformity in one and two-dimensional projections for both the full design and each slice. A construction of quasi-sliced orthogonal arrays based on these constructed doubly orthogonal quasi-Sudoku Latin squares is also provided and can, in turn, be used to generate sliced space-filling designs which achieve uniformity in one and two-dimensional projections for the full design and and uniformity in two-dimensional projections for each slice. These constructions are very practical to implement and yield a spectrum of design sizes and numbers of factors not currently broadly available.
  • We develop a fast variational approximation scheme for Gaussian process (GP) regression, where the spectrum of the covariance function is subjected to a sparse approximation. Our approach enables uncertainty in covariance function hyperparameters to be treated without using Monte Carlo methods and is robust to overfitting. Our article makes three contributions. First, we present a variational Bayes algorithm for fitting sparse spectrum GP regression models that uses nonconjugate variational message passing to derive fast and efficient updates. Second, we propose a novel adaptive neighbourhood technique for obtaining predictive inference that is effective in dealing with nonstationarity. Regression is performed locally at each point to be predicted and the neighbourhood is determined using a measure defined based on lengthscales estimated from an initial fit. Weighting dimensions according to lengthscales, this downweights variables of little relevance, leading to automatic variable selection and improved prediction. Third, we introduce a technique for accelerating convergence in nonconjugate variational message passing by adapting step sizes in the direction of the natural gradient of the lower bound. Our adaptive strategy can be easily implemented and empirical results indicate significant speedups.
  • We propose a novel Bayesian nonparametric method for hierarchical modelling on a set of related density functions, where grouped data in the form of samples from each density function are available. Borrowing strength across the groups is a major challenge in this context. To address this problem, we introduce a hierarchically structured prior, defined over a set of univariate density functions, using convenient transformations of Gaussian processes. Inference is performed through approximate Bayesian computation (ABC), via a novel functional regression adjustment. The performance of the proposed method is illustrated via a simulation study and an analysis of rural high school exam performance in Brazil.
  • In stochastic variational inference, the variational Bayes objective function is optimized using stochastic gradient approximation, where gradients computed on small random subsets of data are used to approximate the true gradient over the whole data set. This enables complex models to be fit to large data sets as data can be processed in mini-batches. In this article, we extend stochastic variational inference for conjugate-exponential models to nonconjugate models and present a stochastic nonconjugate variational message passing algorithm for fitting generalized linear mixed models that is scalable to large data sets. In addition, we show that diagnostics for prior-likelihood conflict, which are useful for Bayesian model criticism, can be obtained from nonconjugate variational message passing automatically, as an alternative to simulation-based Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. Finally, we demonstrate that for moderate-sized data sets, convergence can be accelerated by using the stochastic version of nonconjugate variational message passing in the initial stage of optimization before switching to the standard version.
  • The effects of different parametrizations on the convergence of Bayesian computational algorithms for hierarchical models are well explored. Techniques such as centering, noncentering and partial noncentering can be used to accelerate convergence in MCMC and EM algorithms but are still not well studied for variational Bayes (VB) methods. As a fast deterministic approach to posterior approximation, VB is attracting increasing interest due to its suitability for large high-dimensional data. Use of different parametrizations for VB has not only computational but also statistical implications, as different parametrizations are associated with different factorized posterior approximations. We examine the use of partially noncentered parametrizations in VB for generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs). Our paper makes four contributions. First, we show how to implement an algorithm called nonconjugate variational message passing for GLMMs. Second, we show that the partially noncentered parametrization can adapt to the quantity of information in the data and determine a parametrization close to optimal. Third, we show that partial noncentering can accelerate convergence and produce more accurate posterior approximations than centering or noncentering. Finally, we demonstrate how the variational lower bound, produced as part of the computation, can be useful for model selection.
  • Mixtures of linear mixed models (MLMMs) are useful for clustering grouped data and can be estimated by likelihood maximization through the EM algorithm. The conventional approach to determining a suitable number of components is to compare different mixture models using penalized log-likelihood criteria such as BIC.We propose fitting MLMMs with variational methods which can perform parameter estimation and model selection simultaneously. A variational approximation is described where the variational lower bound and parameter updates are in closed form, allowing fast evaluation. A new variational greedy algorithm is developed for model selection and learning of the mixture components. This approach allows an automatic initialization of the algorithm and returns a plausible number of mixture components automatically. In cases of weak identifiability of certain model parameters, we use hierarchical centering to reparametrize the model and show empirically that there is a gain in efficiency by variational algorithms similar to that in MCMC algorithms. Related to this, we prove that the approximate rate of convergence of variational algorithms by Gaussian approximation is equal to that of the corresponding Gibbs sampler which suggests that reparametrizations can lead to improved convergence in variational algorithms as well.
  • Modern statistical applications involving large data sets have focused attention on statistical methodologies which are both efficient computationally and able to deal with the screening of large numbers of different candidate models. Here we consider computationally efficient variational Bayes approaches to inference in high-dimensional heteroscedastic linear regression, where both the mean and variance are described in terms of linear functions of the predictors and where the number of predictors can be larger than the sample size. We derive a closed form variational lower bound on the log marginal likelihood useful for model selection, and propose a novel fast greedy search algorithm on the model space which makes use of one step optimization updates to the variational lower bound in the current model for screening large numbers of candidate predictor variables for inclusion/exclusion in a computationally thrifty way. We show that the model search strategy we suggest is related to widely used orthogonal matching pursuit algorithms for model search but yields a framework for potentially extending these algorithms to more complex models. The methodology is applied in simulations and in two real examples involving prediction for food constituents using NIR technology and prediction of disease progression in diabetes.
  • Model selection is an important activity in modern data analysis and the conventional Bayesian approach to this problem involves calculation of marginal likelihoods for different models, together with diagnostics which examine specific aspects of model fit. Calculating the marginal likelihood is a difficult computational problem. Our article proposes some extensions of the Laplace approximation for this task that are related to copula models and which are easy to apply. Variations which can be used both with and without simulation from the posterior distribution are considered, as well as use of the approximations with bridge sampling and in random effects models with a large number of latent variables. The use of a t-copula to obtain higher accuracy when multivariate dependence is not well captured by a Gaussian copula is also discussed.